Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ra_

Mary Borgstrom auction

Recommended Posts

Mary died last month at the age of 104. She was an important Canadian potter.
She was also a hoarder and eventually had to move to a care facility.
The family didn't want to deal with the house that was packed full of old junk and were going to bulldoze it.
A picker made a deal to buy it all, house included.
He has now restored the house and while clearing it, he found over 100 pieces of Mary's pottery.
It seemed that Mary shipped a lot of her pieces to museums and when they shipped them back after the exhibition, she's just pack the box away on a shelf.

The collection was broken into two parts. The first part is over.
The last of her pottery, including some of her trademark spheres, is about to go to a 2 week online auction.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XSeQUIvvkM

After viewing the pottery, click on Curiosity Incorporated to see the series on the house, which is just ending.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well--that was just sad. (The videos exposing the hording disorder--some of the clay work was interesting). The condition is so resistent to treatment, and so very distressing to family members---hard to watch, let alone live with. Any idea what the little holes in the spheres are--they look rough or accidental or a flaw, but maybe there is an aesthetic or purpose there? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/19/2019 at 11:05 PM, LeeU said:

Any idea what the little holes in the spheres are--they look rough or accidental or a flaw, but maybe there is an aesthetic or purpose there? 

I think she just liked to experiment with different looks.
The hoarding was sad but Alex Archbold did a lot to save her work and re-introduce her to the art world.
He met with Mary a number of times and was planning to bring her to see her home once it was all restored but she died just before her visit.
Her final wish was to be taken to the cemetery in Alex's Ghostbusters ambulance.

Much of Mary's work was inspired by the work of indiginous people.
She dug her own clay and open-fired her pots in her backyard makeshift kiln.
She also did extensive work with natural glazes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.