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When you have your finger(s) in the handle, whether it's one or 4 all you need is a small amount of air space between the body of the mug and your fingers. Big loopy handles are awkward, especially if you have small hands, a round cross section of handle can lead to the mug not feeling secure when you hold it, the mug likes to roll. Strap shaped handles are nice if the edges are rounded over, if you put the tip of your index finger against the tip of your thumb and make  an even edged almond shape that shape seems to work well also. I like having the edges of the handles mirror the thinness of the very top of the rim and then having the middle section a bit thicker. Just make a few hundred mugs and it'll get to be second nature, some will just feel more comfortable. 

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I constantly remember how my first professor would go on and on about how a handle should be small enough not to look like an ear on the side of the pot, but large enough to get 2-3 fingers into it. I really was not a big fan of his, but some things keep coming back. I have tried to make mine fit my hand and have a comfortable angle from lifting straight across, or from slightly above.

 

best,

Pres

 

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44 minutes ago, Min said:

When you have your finger(s) in the handle, whether it's one or 4 all you need is a small amount of air space between the body of the mug and your fingers. Big loopy handles are awkward, especially if you have small hands, a round cross section of handle can lead to the mug not feeling secure when you hold it, the mug likes to roll. Strap shaped handles are nice if the edges are rounded over, if you put the tip of your index finger against the tip of your thumb and make  an even edged almond shape that shape seems to work well also. I like having the edges of the handles mirror the thinness of the very top of the rim and then having the middle section a bit thicker. Just make a few hundred mugs and it'll get to be second nature, some will just feel more comfortable. 

Exactly about the air space.  A handle further away from the body doesn't give more room for fingers or make it anymore comfortable to hold, it just moves the hand further from the center of gravity.  It puts a lot more strain on the connection points of the handle, is harder to hold without tipping when full of liquid, and rarely looks aesthetic.  Even the really freaky handles like small flat squares protruding from the side of a cylinder look good as long as they're close to that 1/3rd measurement.  I've seen some pretty crazy handles that still look great aesthetically!

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Also where its attached to mug body matters a lot. To low attachment and you are fighting a heavy mug of fluids .Teacups are a good example of this. The one finger is holding all the teacup weight. I feel you want not to be leveraging the weight so I attach nearer the rim. My handlke always are below rim but my thumbspots often get above rim on handles.

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16 hours ago, Rockhopper said:

I definitely think the one on the light background, and the dark blue/gray one look like they 'fit' the mug better than the other two.

20170218_214903b.jpg.d967961cefd225feb3537f2754f79eb7.jpg

This one looks more balanced.

As everyone else has said .........

and

If you ask 10 potters for an opinion, you'll get 12 different answer.

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Another tip most people try to balance the feel of the handle with the mug empty. I see people pick up an empty mug and be like oh the balance feels so good. But really that mug is off balance if it feels good empty. Need to actually fill it with water or coffee to see how it really holds. 

Edited by Joseph Fireborn

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2 hours ago, Joseph Fireborn said:

Another tip most people try to balance the feel of the handle with the mug empty. I see people pick up an empty mug and be like oh the balance feels so good. But really that mug is off balance if it feels good empty. Need to actually fill it with water or coffee to see how it really holds. 

And then keep it full? ;) Bottom of the handle on the wall passing through the center of gravity  is the go to for large pouring pots but is it necessary for the average sized mug?

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I think it’s a common problem for potters to make the handle too big (far away from body). I have 1 finger mugs from other makers that I enjoy using, as well as full hand handles. I personally try to keep mine close to the body and Lower so it balances the weight of liquid better. 

Attachment place is also key depending on form or any surface work. No “rules” per se... but certainly there are better aesthetic choices. 

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The thing is, the cups that have handles your not quite sure about, will find a loving home. I don't know how many times I've made a set of cups that I am not crazy about, and take them to a show, even resist putting them out, and someone comes along, goads me to bring them out, and I sell everyone of them in no time, even going as far as discovering a new form I may have never given a thought too. 

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A guy here dents his mugs inwards and places handle so it passes over the dented area. Always nice to drink from. Winter I like to slide my fi gers through the handle and cup the mug for warmth.

Then we go to winter mugs...smaller circumference of rim....

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Hi - I pull  my handles and curl the handles inwards, once they are pulled, I let them harden slightly before attaching them to the mugs,

Push the top of the handle  hard onto the top of the mug,and tidy as you go -  and with a curl, you can actually  "tighten" the handle to suit the placement, scratch where you are going to attach, glue ( with some slip) and push the curled part against the mug.     I have never had any handles come away from the mug with this method, and find them very comfortable to drink from.   Once handles are attached, store your mugs upsid100_2602.JPG.c0ef8137e00aa7191adca77b611724c3.JPGe down to "drop' correctly.

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13 hours ago, Babs said:

A guy here dents his mugs inwards and places handle so it passes over the dented area. Always nice to drink from. Winter I like to slide my fi gers through the handle and cup the mug for warmth.

Then we go to winter mugs...smaller circumference of rim....

Yeah, I always put my hand through the handle on the mug. . . feels good on the arthur areas even though it may burn the hand a bit.

 

best,

Pres

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13 hours ago, Pres said:

Yeah, I always put my hand through the handle on the mug. . . feels good on the arthur areas even though it may burn the hand a bit.

 

best,

Pres

Ditto:-))

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