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functional vs. sculptural


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#21 Pres

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 07:54 AM


I like functional pottery better than sculptural. I like to make functional things, I like the look of functional things better, I just plain like functional pots more. And I know that I immediately judge pots by what I like and don't like.


Phill,
we are completely opposite in our opinions, I can re-phrase you in the exact opposite:
I like artistic and sculptural pots more than functional. I like the looks of artistic things better, I just plain like artistic pots more. And I judge pots very much on their artistic merit.

Interesting thing is: neither of us are right or wrong.


In this day of extremism and divisiveness, it is good to hear a moderate tone allowing others to have their own opinion. When I was teaching, we often would classify objects as functional, decorative, and sculptural. I personally do not prefer the dust collectors all over the place preferring a less is more approach to decorarating. Loved seeing all of the pots in the home in NC, but would hate to have to dust over 2000 pieces of pottery either functional or sculptural. By the way-do you allow a functional pot that is so immense that it can no longer function as originally intended to be accepted as sculpture?

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#22 OffCenter

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:34 AM

Who cares how it relates to " the historical European influences and "standards" on painting and sculpture in North America?"
What does that have to do with the price of eggs in China?


Too bad he never replied to this.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#23 JBaymore

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 11:26 AM


Who cares how it relates to " the historical European influences and "standards" on painting and sculpture in North America?"
What does that have to do with the price of eggs in China?


Too bad he never replied to this.

Jim



"He" was away at NCECA. "He" is now catching up on all that was left undone.

.............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#24 OffCenter

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:03 PM



Who cares how it relates to " the historical European influences and "standards" on painting and sculpture in North America?"
What does that have to do with the price of eggs in China?


Too bad he never replied to this.

Jim



"He" was away at NCECA. "He" is now catching up on all that was left undone.

.............john


That's okay. Not exactly waiting with bated or baited breath.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#25 catpaws

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 11:42 AM

to me a good pot is one that cries out to be picked up and handled. I have seen some work that iv'e thought "oh my god, that's fantastic" and has been priced, in my opinion, far too cheaply and because of that, some have dismissed it as not worthy of even looking at. On the other hand, I've seen some truly awful rubbish that has cost a fortune because the potter has a "name". I love eavesdropping at shows to artists spouting pretentious twaddle to gullible members of the public and never ceased to be amazed by what people actually buy because they've been taken in by the sales pitch. "I never use commercially available minerals, I always travel to the dead sea to collect my own sea minerals" being one example I overheard at Hatfield show in the u.k. The stuff should have been returned to the bottom of the dead sea! If a pot says,"pick me, pick me" to me then that's all it takes for me, I don't care WHY it's good, it just is.

#26 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 08:01 AM

to me a good pot is one that cries out to be picked up and handled. I have seen some work that iv'e thought "oh my god, that's fantastic" and has been priced, in my opinion, far too cheaply and because of that, some have dismissed it as not worthy of even looking at. On the other hand, I've seen some truly awful rubbish that has cost a fortune because the potter has a "name". I love eavesdropping at shows to artists spouting pretentious twaddle to gullible members of the public and never ceased to be amazed by what people actually buy because they've been taken in by the sales pitch. "I never use commercially available minerals, I always travel to the dead sea to collect my own sea minerals" being one example I overheard at Hatfield show in the u.k. The stuff should have been returned to the bottom of the dead sea! If a pot says,"pick me, pick me" to me then that's all it takes for me, I don't care WHY it's good, it just is.


This reminds me of a beautiful 3-4' contemporary japanese porcelain sculpture at NCECA in Portland in the 1980s. It had the most luscious celadon glaze
on it that every person (ceramics person) entering that room had to touch it. There was a guard standing next to it warning "do not touch". But it was irresistible to clay people. If anyone has been to the I.M.Pei wing of the national gallery in Washington DC.there is something similar. At hand height where the lines pass for admission, the sharp edge of the white marble facade has a brown spot from where people are drawn to touch. The light on the form of the building make it appear razor sharp. But it is the light causing this. People respond to similar things it seems by instinct.
Marcia




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