Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi there - Hope this is the right forum to post! I am the clay tech at a public studio, and we want to have a 16-18 Wheel class. However, there are concerns from the Executive Director of the community centre regarding bone development. He says there is a bone in the had that is not fully developed until age 18, and that it can be damaged by wheel throwing. I have never heard of such a thing. Any thoughts?

 

Thanks all! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds as if the executive  director doesn’t want to fund the program, and is using “scare-mongering” techniques to gain support for his agenda. Don’t believe that any bone that wasn’t fully developed by 18 would have survived the childhood of most adults born before computer games became the norm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Fred Sweet said:

Sounds as if the executive  director doesn’t want to fund the program, and is using “scare-mongering” techniques to gain support for his agenda. Don’t believe that any bone that wasn’t fully developed by 18 would have survived the childhood of most adults born before computer games became the norm.

I don’t think it’s lack of funding - classes fund a lot of our studio op and we have classes for 16-18 in a bunch of other disciplines! The video game thing is a great point! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The director makes an interesting point but I would have to ask which sport and work activities need to be avoided until age eighteen as well?  This appears to be something that deserves some honest research to determine if it is valid. Having said that, even if not entirely based in fact, this director seems pretty dead set against the idea. It would make me wonder.

lots and lots of high school ceramics programs out there, I wonder what age group they serve? Just sayin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taught High School for over 36 yrs. Taught Ceramics 2 students wheel throwing, 50 minute classes 5 times a week. Never any problems with throwing or with handbuilding that required wedging. In the long run I tend to believe that people believe what they want to believe, especially when they have other reasons that they are supporting with their nefarious beliefs. Now how you will find out what the other reasons are is quite difficult. I believe that this could only be done with continuous discourse until he reveals his true reasons for believing that the hand bones will be damaged.  Wonder what his beliefs are about little league, pee wee leagues and other child sports leagues.

 

best,

Pres 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, oldlady said:

do you plan to chain these young people to the wheel and make them work for 20 hours at a time?    i wonder what else the director worries about.

How else are you supposed to get them to work and produce?!

14 hours ago, liambesaw said:

Seems silly, I was introduced to the wheel in third grade, still have all my bones and they're fairly developed at 35.

Yes, but can you definitively say, that said bone, didn't maybe *not* develop at all, or perhaps fuse with another bone, due to all that clay work?!

When need a study.  First off, obviously, we need twins. (Clones would also be acceptable, but that's too much ethical debate, and red tape).

Then, we have one twin start an extensive clay throwing regimen starting at a young age.  The other, will not.  We will then check in, once they are adults, and compare the results.  Any wrist/ arm issues, that occur, are obviously due to the clay work.  Even any issues with the other twin, who did not work with clay, are because of the clay, because  obviously the twins have that special connection, where pain and injuries are transferred. 

Seriously though, the most taxing part of wheel throwing, and clay work is wedging, which the students wouldn't even have to do, at least not in the quantities, that it would cause an issue.  Centering can be pretty taxing, but for kids, they do have "Quick Center" systems for wheels, that would make that even a non-issue.  I would present that, to the Director, and if they still have an issue, it might be more of a "Them" thing, than something related to the kid's potential risk of injury. 

Also, I think the only risk of wrist injury is for life-long potters, like Mark C., who as legend says, now has a wrist that is a combination of cybernetics and "Frankenstein Science"...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:huh:

"Girls usually continue to grow until a bone age of about 14 years, and boys stop growing after a bone age of 16 years..."

...besides the variance of maturity at eighteen - from reached adult "size" a few years ago to a few growth spurts (years) still to go; no throwin' 'til eighteen sounds arbitrary to ludicrous t'me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.