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Momo

Re-glazing high-fired pieces

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Hello.

I have a few high-fired glazed pieces that I'm unhappy about. Is it possible to re-glaze using earthenware glazes and then re-fire at earthenware temperatures? The reason for doing this is simply so I don't have to fire at such a high temperature again (trying to reduce time and cost)

So just to clarify: would a low-fire glaze work on top of a previously fired high-fired glaze?

Thank you.

Edited by Momo

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Try it out and see.  Personally I haven't had much luck with refiring, glaze tended to crawl, but that was cone 6, reglazed areas refired to cone 6.  If you do it, be sure to put a waster cookie under it, glaze might be extra drippy.

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25 minutes ago, Momo said:

Thank you. Yes, I thought I'd give it a try anyway but just thought I'd ask as I'm guessing I'm not the first person to want to try this. 

Yeah, the problem with a question like this is that the answer will always be "it depends", just because of all of the variables involved.  It's been done millions of times but each time and situation is a little (or a lot!) Different so the likelihood of one persons experience translating to your situation is probably unlikely.

If it works let us know, and then keep track of it for yourself too. You'll know that x glaze over y fired glaze = success or failure, and you can use that knowledge next time you want to reglaze

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10 minutes ago, liambesaw said:

Yeah, the problem with a question like this is that the answer will always be "it depends", just because of all of the variables involved.  It's been done millions of times but each time and situation is a little (or a lot!) Different so the likelihood of one persons experience translating to your situation is probably unlikely.

If it works let us know, and then keep track of it for yourself too. You'll know that x glaze over y fired glaze = success or failure, and you can use that knowledge next time you want to reglaze

Good advice. I'll let you know how I get on.  Thanks again. 

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I’ve done it many times with mostly positive results, the difficulty is getting a sufficient enough layer of new glaze material to stick to the previously glazed vetrified piece. I’ve never used hair spray although have read it can help the glaze to adheare, if the piece is small enough I’ll put it in the microwave for a minute or two that will do 2 things , heat the surface a little and neutralize some of the surface oil from things like oil transferred from skin contact. Otherwise I’ll heat it with an electric heat gun, Then  work quickly while the piece is warm.  Use a loaded brush, a soft touch and try to avoid going over areas a second time as repeated brush strokes will begin to work against you. You will have to practice a little to get the feel, luckily if it fails to apply like you like it’s very easy to rinse off the newly applied glaze and start over.

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52 minutes ago, 1515art said:

I’ve done it many times with mostly positive results, the difficulty is getting a sufficient enough layer of new glaze material to stick to the previously glazed vetrified piece. I’ve never used hair spray although have read it can help the glaze to adheare, if the piece is small enough I’ll put it in the microwave for a minute or two that will do 2 things , heat the surface a little and neutralize some of the surface oil from things like oil transferred from skin contact. Otherwise I’ll heat it with an electric heat gun, Then  work quickly while the piece is warm.  Use a loaded brush, a soft touch and try to avoid going over areas a second time as repeated brush strokes will begin to work against you. You will have to practice a little to get the feel, luckily if it fails to apply like you like it’s very easy to rinse off the newly applied glaze and start over.

Thank you!

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Also, do not get the piece to be refired wet!! Sometimes moisture gets into the body and comes out explosively when heated quickly, as one might do with a refire. If it has gotten wet, place in an oven at the lowest possible temperature for several hours, or heat your refiring kiln very slowly. 

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