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ThisIsMelissa

How many firings for underglaze application?

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I'm working on cone 06 fired bisque, with a brown clay that vitrifies at cone 6.

I'm applying Amaco Velvets using an 18 gauge applicator bottle.

I was advised to fire the underglaze first (I presume in the bisque load).

And then apply the clear gloss coat and fire to cone 6.

 

Is this how you'd handle it?

 

Or would you just apply the gloss coat and fire to cone 6?

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I'm working on cone 06 fired bisque, with a brown clay that vitrifies at cone 6.

I'm applying Amaco Velvets using an 18 gauge applicator bottle.

I was advised to fire the underglaze first (I presume in the bisque load).

And then apply the clear gloss coat and fire to cone 6.

 

Is this how you'd handle it?

 

Or would you just apply the gloss coat and fire to cone 6?

 

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That is the normal way. Make sure your velvets are all good at cone 6. Some colors do not go to cone 6, especially red, yellow and orange.

 

You can experimen:

try to appling your velvets and glaze to one greenware piece and firing once.

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That is the normal way. Make sure your velvets are all good at cone 6. Some colors may not go to cone 6, especially red, yellow and orange.<BR><BR

 

>You can experiment:

;try to appling your velvets and glaze to one greenware piece and firing once.

paint velvets on greenware, bisque, glaze and fire

paint velvets on bisque, dlaze and fire.

 

 

Compare and see which works best.

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neilestrick    1,381

Commercial underglazes can be applied at any stage in the process- wet, leather hard, bone dry or bisque. They do not need to be fired on before applying a glaze. There are usually enough binders and hardeners in them that you can even brush glazes on top without smearing the underglaze. In my kids classes we usually apply the underglazes to bisque ware, then dip in a clear glaze the next day, after the underglaze has dried. The benefit to applying to bisque is that the porosity of the pot dries each coat very quickly, and the pot is more durable.

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Idaho Potter    62

I apply underglazes on greenware, then bisque fire, then glaze and fire either cone 6 or Raku. I've tried glazing without firing the underglazes and ended up with feathery edges where I preferred sharp edges. It's all a matter of personal choice.

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Ivar    1

Ialso apply underglaze on greenware, then bisque fire, then transparent glaze and another firing. It can be done all in one step, but results may be different. Testing is best way to see all posiblle results and decide what you prefer.

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JLowes    28

Unless I misread what you meant, you are using an 18 gauge applicator, so you must be applying the underglaze as linework, instead of larger areas. I have applied underglazes to bisque, then clear on top using a very wet brush and kind of laying it on to keep from brushing off any underglaze. This works for me, and I apply color selectively in small areas and larger areas. If you watch how you apply the clear, especially where you have lines, you should be able do it with one post bisque firing.

 

By the way, my "avatar", the yellow dog, is my signature raku piece and all of the color and clear crackle glaze is applied onto bisque fired clay as described above and then raku fired. I tried putting the yellow on greenware then firing to bisque, and on bisque and firing with another load of greenware, and I found for my process the color was better when applied to bisque and raku fired next. I have included a grouping of a few of my raku animals showing the result.

The yellow, tan and black areas on the animals are Amaco Velvets with the clear crackle over.

 

John

post-2045-133175060342_thumb.jpg

post-2045-133175060342_thumb.jpg

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Chris Campbell    1,088

One risk in doing the clear directly on top of the underglaze is that it could smear and you would lose all your hard work.

Another is that you won't be able to correct any thin spots or brush strokes once you glaze it.

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