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Anne Castano

Are we living in the past

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AmeriSwede    5

... I love seeing the excitement that folks put into their posts when they bring home a new kiln or wheel on a whim. So much more refreshing than hearing how trapped someone with tons of education/experience feels after hanging around for years after the fun has ended for them in all of this...

 

 

 

I would agree with that as well. Fortunately we don't have much in the way of those vastly educated/experienced individuals still hanging around after their fun has ended! Though I have heard them in the real world, what a drag!

 

At 60 and educated/experienced, I'm still finding so much more I wish to learn and experience with the passing days. Creativity is synonymous with humanity, in my opinion, and burns hot in me. I personally feel I've learned more in the past 10 years than the previous 20, even speaking a new language. An additional element to vie with my limited time, I'll begin sustainable beekeeping this summer, having just built a large hive last week. Once I make space for a cow, my life will be 'milk & honey'... and well ... more art. biggrin.gif

 

----Rick

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INYA    4

OMG, I live in such a different world!

Ceramics is not a profession for me, it`s my love and I have to do all sorts of commercial things (graphic design, commercial gift manufacturing...) to stay alive and do what I love in the spare time.

I know about four potters in my country and I think I know them all ;), and about 20 people working with ceramics.

With 2 million inhabitants even "Buy local" is not a solution (ok maybe 2 million with swiss GDP)

 

Love this site though!

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clayartz    0

Yes I can concur with that whether it be pottery, sculpture or other user interactive ceramics like unique hand made lamp bases or jewellery.

 

 

Love your post John, but disagree about the need for $$$$ money. This could be a simpler grass roots effort.

 

I think we should hitch on to the "Buy Local" trend right now while it is growing in the public mind. Locally produced, human made pots are a perfect fit for it.

Serve that locally grown food on a locally made plate.

The people who can afford to buy fresh, local produce are the same economic group who can afford to buy a real pot.

 

I'm thinking large and small package stickers, bumper stickers, t-shirts with a unified slogan ... It can be as simple as BUY LOCAL POTTERY.

 

Yes, it is something ACerS & Potters Council might be able to do but I would like to hear from our Members ... would you buy and use these stickers and tees?

 

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Hi

 

My name is Anne Castano I am new to Ceramic Arts Daily and though I would share a link to my blog where I am kicking up a stink and trying to generate debate about contemporary ceramics. My latest post raises some points regarding the role of the ceramic artist/ceramist/potter/maker in contemporary society from a British view point. I know that the American market is different and would be interested to hear any views on the influence Leach has hade on ceramics both in the UK and abroad.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read my post.

 

Anne

 

 

I can give a view of the Swiss side here. People in Switzerland are used to pay more money for everything, so they would also pay more money for ceramic objects, but only if they are displayed in, say, a gallery or in an expensive shop. Swiss people think that objects that are expensive are in principle of high quality and they then aren't suspicious anymore. Sad to say: you only have to display mediocre ceramics in a gallery, put a high price on it and people will buy it, thinking it's high standard. On the other hand, ceramists in Switzerland are very envious and try with all their might to push another ceramist down whenever the situation arises. I'd love to life in the States and work together with US (or UK - sorry Anne) ceramists.

 

Greetings from otherwise beautiful Switzerland

 

Evelyne

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

OMG, I live in such a different world!

Ceramics is not a profession for me, it`s my love and I have to do all sorts of commercial things (graphic design, commercial gift manufacturing...) to stay alive and do what I love in the spare time.

I know about four potters in my country and I think I know them all ;), and about 20 people working with Ceramics.

With 2 million inhabitants even "Buy local" is not a solution (ok maybe 2 million with swiss GDP)

 

Love this site though!

 

I was in Switzerland 2 years ago and visited a potter near Bern. I didn't realize she was so rare. Actually, the headquarters of the International Academy of Ceramics is in Zurich. I think there must be more Ceramics people there.

Marcia

 

 

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OMG, I live in such a different world!

Ceramics is not a profession for me, it`s my love and I have to do all sorts of commercial things (graphic design, commercial gift manufacturing...) to stay alive and do what I love in the spare time.

I know about four potters in my country and I think I know them all ;), and about 20 people working with Ceramics.

With 2 million inhabitants even "Buy local" is not a solution (ok maybe 2 million with swiss GDP)

 

Love this site though!

 

I was in Switzerland 2 years ago and visited a potter near Bern. I didn't realize she was so rare. Actually, the headquarters of the International Academy of Ceramics is in Zurich. I think there must be more Ceramics people there.

Marcia

 

 

 

 

Marcia, if you are referring to INYA's post: she's living in Slovenia/Europe. Slovenia is a very beautiful, but not so big country, with a border to Italy (near Trieste). Slovenia has a Ceramics Trienniale (UNICUM) by the way.

In Switzerland there are more than 20 potters alright. Don't know how many of them are really everyday potters, but much more than 100 I guess.

Greetings

Evelyne

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Kabe    7

Love your post John, but disagree about the need for $$$$$$$ money. This could be a simpler grass roots effort.

 

I think we should hitch on to the "Buy Local" trend right now while it is growing in the public mind. Locally produced, human made pots are a perfect fit for it.

Serve that locally grown food on a locally made plate.

The people who can afford to buy fresh, local produce are the same economic group who can afford to buy a real pot.

 

I'm thinking large and small package stickers, bumper stickers, t-shirts with a unified slogan ... It can be as simple as BUY LOCAL POTTERY.

 

Yes, it is something ACerS & Potters Council might be able to do but I would like to hear from our Members ... would you buy and use these stickers and tees?

 

 

 

I think this is a great disscusion. I want to add a small thought on Buy Local. Our annual Farmers market will be starting soon here in North MO. where farmers bring thier stuff to be sold to a local mall area and set up. Produce, some craft stuff, food and cheese. I am going to try to set up a way for them to display their produce in some of my bowls, maybe see if some large bread making bowls could be be peddled by the bread lady or by a group selling organic flour. My large bowl comes with all the ingredience to make some bread,a package deal. Some deviled egg trays with the egg salesman. maybe some pie plates with a pie in it. Salsa bowls, Casserol dishes you get the idea. I am thinking that the market could be like a mini gallery. I get my stuff shown, hopefully sell a pot or two, they get a chance to make a little profit from my work just for using it. "Where did you get that Bowl?" " Oh I got it at the farmers market." Word of mouth can be good. I would have to keep track of who has what, but a digital camera would simplify some of that. I am hoping that I can find a way to have product there but I don,t have to set up a spot myself. I'm sure you could lose a bowl or two but you could figure in giving some work to the venders for selling your work, they would be the ones hauling it around. I believe you get back what you put out. If I put out trust and I will get trust back. Still in the idea stage but it seems good on paper. I think this would help to promote ceramics locally. Maybe someone else can up their summer sales through a farmers market. I think I have Chris to thank for the idea the seed was planted through her Local Marketing push. Ain't clay fun Kabe

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INYA    4

OMG, I live in such a different world!

Ceramics is not a profession for me, it`s my love and I have to do all sorts of commercial things (graphic design, commercial gift manufacturing...) to stay alive and do what I love in the spare time.

I know about four potters in my country and I think I know them all ;), and about 20 people working with Ceramics.

With 2 million inhabitants even "Buy local" is not a solution (ok maybe 2 million with swiss GDP)

 

Love this site though!

 

I was in Switzerland 2 years ago and visited a potter near Bern. I didn't realize she was so rare. Actually, the headquarters of the International Academy of Ceramics is in Zurich. I think there must be more Ceramics people there.

Marcia

 

 

 

 

Marcia, if you are referring to INYA's post: she's living in Slovenia/Europe. Slovenia is a very beautiful, but not so big country, with a border to Italy (near Trieste). Slovenia has a Ceramics Trienniale (UNICUM) by the way.

In Switzerland there are more than 20 potters alright. Don't know how many of them are really everyday potters, but much more than 100 I guess.

Greetings

Evelyne

 

 

Yes, Slovenia has Ceramics Triennale, my acquaintance was excluded few years ago because he used laser print technique. They did not know the technique so they rejected him (he is a ceramic professor on state university). Old farts!

I guess they did not expect it to become so popular these days :)

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Pres    896

The traffic was less in that area than in the rest of the show. For some reason people perceived that the local artists were of lesser quality than the others.

 

Pres,

 

You know what the definition of "expert" is in the business consulting world?

 

<scroll down>

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

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Anyone more than 100 miles from home with a briefcase.

 

wink.gif

 

best,

 

..........................john

 

 

Excellent quote John-having worked for a school district for over 30 years I saw this every time a new initiative came around. I also saw it when computers came into the schools-local people knew nothing-It had to be someone from Philly, or Pittsburgh or Washington D.C. Local experts were unheard of and knew nothing.

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OffCenter    82

It's just another tempest in a teapot. This same sort of thing was being debated when I potted back in the 70's. Back then a lot of people were predicting the demise of pottery making within the decade. It never has been and never will be something that is important to the average joe and just as in the past when you say you're a potter you'll get a blank stare or at best, "You mean you make cups and things on one of those spinning things?". And, yes, people who've taken a 4-week throwing class at a local community center will be displaying their god-awful, clunky crap and people will be buying it because they like the bright pink glaze or because a mug with a handle that looks like a worm in agony is three dollars cheaper than a mug that some potter took the proverbial 30 years to make. But there are people out there, other than potters, who do love good pottery and collect it and people who just want a great coffee mug. And the colleges and universities are still turning out potters determined to do something extraordinary. (Actually, if there is anything we should be concerned about it is the fact that some universities are dropping pottery because of the expense.) Trying to hitch a ride on the "Buy Local" movement is silly. (I say this while the biggest pottery show in Georgia is going on right now, 6 miles from my house!) I want to sell pots in New York, San Francisco, Portland, etc, not at my local farmer's market and if I want a mug, I want it to be a Steven Hill or Mike Jabbur mug, not necessarily a locally made mug. The important thing is that we keep on keeping on and appreciate all the magnificent things potters are doing.

 

Jim

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INYA    4

I agree wih Offcenter, but don`t you think that buying localy can also mean "from the same continent"

 

I know buying local food means about 300 km from home but I guess pottery is a little different since you don`t buy it every day and use it much longer

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JBaymore    1,432

The traffic was less in that area than in the rest of the show. For some reason people perceived that the local artists were of lesser quality than the others.

 

Pres,

 

You know what the definition of "expert" is in the business consulting world?

 

<scroll down>

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

Anyone more than 100 miles from home with a briefcase.

 

wink.gif

 

best,

 

..........................john

 

Excellent quote John-having worked for a school district for over 30 years I saw this every time a new initiative came around. I also saw it when computers came into the schools-local people knew nothing-It had to be someone from Philly, or Pittsburgh or Washington D.C. Local experts were unheard of and knew nothing.

 

 

Pres,

 

Another aspect of this same kind of thing that I and my faculty colleagues at the college find quite amusing is when we have a visiting artist come in and do a workshop and they share something with the students. A day later the students are coming to us raving about this "new idea" or "new technique" or "new approach" or "new philosophy" that the person shared at the workshop.

 

 

We just quietly chuckle to ourselves.... because invariably about 99% of the time.... it is stuff that we have been presenting in our classes all along. Sometimes exactly in the same way or manner of delivery. Sometimes over and over by every one of the faculty they have had. But when it is "the expert" coming in from somewhere else......... they suddenly "get it". laugh.gif

 

Really it doesn't matter where they "get it".................. just that they eventually DO. wink.gif

 

best,

 

.......................john

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Bobg    4

 

 

I think we should hitch on to the "Buy Local" trend right now while it is growing in the public mind. Locally produced, human made pots are a perfect fit for it.

Serve that locally grown food on a locally made plate.

The people who can afford to buy fresh, local produce are the same economic group who can afford to buy a real pot.

 

I'm thinking large and small package stickers, bumper stickers, t-shirts with a unified slogan ... It can be as simple as BUY LOCAL POTTERY.

 

Yes, it is something ACerS & Potters Council might be able to do but I would like to hear from our Members ... would you buy and use these stickers and tees?

 

 

I participate over the summers at a local farmers market where I'm one of three that sell pottery. Local is the big push her, it has to be produced locally and can't be bought from a wholesaler. Every customer that comes to my booth and picks up a piece and looks at the bottom for a stamp or signature most all the time asks if it's locally made and where. When you tell them where and by who they always buy, it may not be a high dollar sale, but you sell something.

 

Bobg

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Chris Campbell    1,087

There really is no predicting these trends ... maybe ten years ago a local breadmaker set up at market and was kind of stuck in the back, shuffled off to the side, you had to look for them ... returned every Saturday with lots of fresh bread and free samples ... now they are showcased up front along with local honey, local pastries, local eggs, local herbs, local flowers .... this is in the part of the market where the rule is everything has to be grown in state and most all of these farmers are probably within fifty miles of the market ... but still the "Local" section gets bigger and busier. I would love to see a local potter up front and center in the mix!

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Pres    896

The traffic was less in that area than in the rest of the show. For some reason people perceived that the local artists were of lesser quality than the others.

 

Pres,

 

You know what the definition of "expert" is in the business consulting world?

 

<scroll down>

 

-

 

-Sad John, more sad is even though your name seemed familiar, it was not until I googled it did I find that I have been looking at your work in books and magazines for years-too bad you students don't. I would not put the label of fame on anyone, but it is nice to see successful reputable folks putting in their time to host or post here. Thanks.

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

Anyone more than 100 miles from home with a briefcase.

 

wink.gif

 

best,

 

..........................john

 

 

Excellent quote John-having worked for a school district for over 30 years I saw this every time a new initiative came around. I also saw it when computers came into the schools-local people knew nothing-It had to be someone from Philly, or Pittsburgh or Washington D.C. Local experts were unheard of and knew nothing.

 

 

 

Pres,

 

Another aspect of this same kind of thing that I and my faculty colleagues at the college find quite amusing is when we have a visiting artist come in and do a workshop and they share something with the students. A day later the students are coming to us raving about this "new idea" or "new technique" or "new approach" or "new philosophy" that the person shared at the workshop.

 

 

We just quietly chuckle to ourselves.... because invariably about 99% of the time.... it is stuff that we have been presenting in our classes all along. Sometimes exactly in the same way or manner of delivery. Sometimes over and over by every one of the faculty they have had. But when it is "the expert" coming in from somewhere else......... they suddenly "get it". laugh.gif

 

Really it doesn't matter where they "get it".................. just that they eventually DO. wink.gif

 

best,

 

.......................john

 

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Red Rocks    3

Just read through this whole, wonderful thread and want to add a little twist to the “Buy Local†concept. When Bernard Leach was throwing pots and blazing new trails – most everyone bought and ate local – no one marketed it and no one thought about it. We have come full circle and the buy local trend is a strong one and will be here for quite some time. It is also now a marketing strategy and viewed as a sustainability objective.

 

I used to travel to Portland, OR quite often and eventually lived there. The city was and is one of the national leaders in the buy local/slow foods movement. I watched it grow and participated quite willingly as a foodie and supporter.

 

I think this is a trend that we can and definitely should leverage. At its core it has an emotional appeal and many people buy on emotion. We can help make this happen at:

- The Potter’s Council / national level with marketing materials that we can all benefit from because of national purchasing power

- We can continue to use this forum to engage in this debate as well as share marketing ideas on how each of us are successfully selling to this trend

- We can create stronger local groups who use “buy local†in our combined as well as individual marketing plans

 

In marketing, timing is everything. We have an opportunity to ride this wave – let’s continue to share and help each other make it happen.

 

 

 

 

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clay lover    133

I put up a small sign at my last craft sale, "NOT Made in China." Sales were nearly double last year at same venue. People really responded. We, the potters, are a great alternative to imported junque, I plan to capitalize on the idea .

 

 

 

I will ask browsers if they would like to keep their $$$ at home instead of supporting another country. They say of course, we chat a while, they buy.:D

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I am currently a resident artist in Vallauris, France. the town is full of potters and galleries. the current event is the XXII International Biennale. there is an excellent show of apanese contemporary ceramics in one museum here next to another larger museum with an international show there. here are four more shows in town related to the Biennale and a Japanese weekend coming in two weeks.

there is some obvious influence of Hamada and Leach but there are also some excited pieces by contemporary Japanese. Also many pieces by contemporary European and A few American ceramic Artists. There is both Sculpture and Fine ceramics. In the gallery down stairs there is a small plate show of mostly Japanese potters.

Marcia

From Vallauris where Picasso may have had more influence than Leach.

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Archie    0

A great discussion. First off I would like to say that if you're creating pottery to make a lot of money,I highly recommend counselling :)

We need first establish why we make pots. I have come to it after many years of admiring vintage pottery. I have taken it up because I think about it when I should be thinking of other things, when I wake up in the night and best of all, when I have my hands deep in clay, and because there is nothing more magical then when I'm pulling up a wall and the stars align and the clay flows between my fingers like an ocean wave rising. I spent most of my life trying to make lots of money and I can tell you that it is a waste of a life. Make what you need to provide food, shelter and clothing and then make pots (or whatever your passion is) and spend time with friends and family and you will have a life well lived.

If your goal is to make more money then I would respectfully ask "how many pottery classes have you taken versus how many business classes have you taken?" Learn about business. Make what sells until your stomach is full and then make what you dream of in the night afterwords.

I want to thank all of the people who take the time to post their knowledge, create videos for me to watch and who support potters in any way, especially CAD.

Archie

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