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Good Morning:

I want to try the bubble glazing with my high school students. I used the google machine to try and find a good recipe but everyone has something different. I tried a couple and every none of them worked amazingly well. I found the soapy liquid tends to run down the side of the pot and only leave a few bubbled spots. I tried using less water, that worked a little bit better. I also found I had to get the bubbles started and scrap the first layer off because these bubbles were to small. Does anyone have a recipe that they have had good success with and do you have any tips for success. I have watched every video on youtube so I am looking for additional information. I have attached my experiments below. Thank you. 

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Ok. Just wanted to make sure you weren't doing it on leather hard, as that would make it more likely to run. I've never actually done it so I'm not going to be a lot of help, but I think it's just finding the right balance of soap to underglaze. A specific recipe will require using the same brand of soap and underglaze, and having the underglaze at the same level of wateriness, which could be difficult unless you're using brand new bottles of underglaze. I would keep trying it with less water and more soap.

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To stop the small bubbles at the start, start blowing them onto a piece of paper and then when they're the size you want slide the paper away. Maybe experiment with transferring the bubbles from a piece of paper to the piece too.  Like an image transfer

Edited by liambesaw

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Yeah, I figured it would just take some experimenting with getting the consistency down. I have been scrapping the little bubbles off but the paper is a good idea. I think the struggle is getting the underglaze to stay with the bubbles as they are made. I keep trying and get back with the results. Keep posting if anyone else has any suggestions. FYI, high schoolers love the underglaze and shaving approach to the marbleized  look. Thanks for the help. 

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this is an overglaze technique!!!  pot should be glazed first and the color is added to a glaze that will go over the first one.

have done this and watched it done several times.   you should be using bisque but already glazed pots.  just a white or pastelish color as a background.  the dawn goes into some of the colored glaze that you want to use.  be sure the two, base and color are compatible or add coloring to the base glaze for the color.   water the glaze down just a little, add some dawn  and use a flowerpot shape for the container.  blow bubbles and leave the container on the table, manipulate the pot you want the bubbles on so it picks up the ones you want.    so, you are holding the pot, trying to blow bubbles and were not born with 3 hands.   and keeping the pot in the air is not easy.

it is easier if you work in a team of 2.  someone blows and the other manipulates the pot.    in a classroom situation, this should be fun for all.   one place used water bottles for the bubbling part and inserted a straw through a hole halfway down the side of the bottle.   resulted in smaller bubbles due to the constriction at the mouth of the bottle.  those places with tiny bubbles in your photo show what happens when you pour the leftovers out over the pot.   

it is and will continue to be a learning experience that can be a lot of fun.  wait to do the really special ones until you have done enough that you think you know what you are doing.   and do try several bubble colors on one pot, makes a change.

Edited by oldlady
clarity

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Hi Fruch,  could you please let me know about the underglaze and shaving technique to achieve a marbled finish . I use the bubbling technique all the time and have tried a few different ways .the one that works best for me  using earthenware clay . If I’m making a bowl for example I underglaze dry green ware with white , allow to dry then mix my bubbles eg three squirts of dish soap, one tablespoon of underglaze and one tablespoon of water. I just double it if I need more. I use a banding wheel to turn the pot. Standing over it easier , the bubbles flow down . I always get bubbles flowing over paper first . My biggest mistake at first was I put too many bubbles on . I then bisque fire once dry . I then just clear  glaze and fire in a glaze fire . Good luck .

 

 

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I have never done it, personally, but I had a student, who came across it (Probably on Pinterest) and wanted to give it a shot.  So we worked through the problem together, and got a great result.

For her's, we did it on bisqueware.  She underglazed a base color, then used a thinned underglaze, a bit of soap to create bubbles in a contained, with a straw.  She held the container over the ware, and let the bubbles spill out of the container, onto it.  Once the bubbles had popped, and the underglaze was dry, she put a clear coat over it.  It turned out very well.

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On 2/15/2019 at 2:12 PM, Carrick said:

Hi Fruch,  could you please let me know about the underglaze and shaving technique to achieve a marbled finish . I use the bubbling technique all the time and have tried a few different ways .the one that works best for me  using earthenware clay . If I’m making a bowl for example I underglaze dry green ware with white , allow to dry then mix my bubbles eg three squirts of dish soap, one tablespoon of underglaze and one tablespoon of water. I just double it if I need more. I use a banding wheel to turn the pot. Standing over it easier , the bubbles flow down . I always get bubbles flowing over paper first . My biggest mistake at first was I put too many bubbles on . I then bisque fire once dry . I then just clear  glaze and fire in a glaze fire . Good luck .

 

 

Good Morning: The shaving cream glazing is so easy and the kids love it and it is so simple. Simply spray shaving cream on a clean table or newsprint. I tell them to make a 8.5" x 11" square by 1" thick, obviously that changes depending on the size of the piece. Then I put different color underglaze in small squirt bottle ( I bought clear ketchup bottles from the dollar store) and they used these to squirt the glaze onto the shaving cream. Once this is complete have them marbleize the glaze into the shaving cream.  They struggle a bit with the next step. I often have them practice with a small pinch pot first because it takes a bit of coordination. Have them set the piece in the shaving cream and roll the piece until it back to were they started.  My video isn't edited or I would add it here. I believe there are some on youtube. It is fun and just an exciting way for students to utilize glaze in a non-traditional way. Hope that helps. 

 

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On 2/15/2019 at 2:30 PM, Benzine said:

I have never done it, personally, but I had a student, who came across it (Probably on Pinterest) and wanted to give it a shot.  So we worked through the problem together, and got a great result.

For her's, we did it on bisqueware.  She underglazed a base color, then used a thinned underglaze, a bit of soap to create bubbles in a contained, with a straw.  She held the container over the ware, and let the bubbles spill out of the container, onto it.  Once the bubbles had popped, and the underglaze was dry, she put a clear coat over it.  It turned out very well.

Thanks for the advice. I tried it over underglaze and it did work much better. I think maybe the bubbles need something to grab rather than the smooth bisque. 

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