Jump to content
docweathers

^6 Glaze for cake decorating style glazing.

Recommended Posts

Glaze is glass and glass flows so i can't imagine a glaze that can maintain a thick, stay put frosting like consistancy.  I agree piping slip is likely going to be the answer for the effect you are looking for.

i found you a tutorial

https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/daily/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/piece-of-cake-how-to-decorate-your-pots-like-a-pastry-chef/

Edited by PSC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the info  I have  full supply of piping tools. I really want t do this as a glaze on bisque.... on top of other glazes. 

 

Would adding alumina hydrate help the glaze keep its form.?  I know it might cause some roughness. Any solution to this?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/6/2019 at 4:46 PM, Magnolia Mud Research said:

I use a low fire grog-less white commercial clay body as a white glaze at cone 10 R.  

You might try a low fire clay body as a stiff slip glaze at cone 6 over (or maybe mixed with) your glaze.   

LT

I have no experience with low fire anything. What cone low fire  clay would you guess might serve as a stiff majolica "cake icing"?

I tried adding 20% alumina hydrate to one of my current majolica glazes. It did absolutely nothing to stiffen up the glaze. 

Does the strategy have any merits i.e. did I not put enough alumina hydrate in the glaze.

Edited by docweathers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The low fire  clay body I use is Armadillo Longhorn White rated cone 05+-.  Use an equivalent clay body from your local source.  Try it on green ware and fire  to cone 6 to see if it is stiff enough.  If not, add some of your regular white clay body to the get the “stiffness “  you want.  That’s the approach I take when developing a new technique. 

LT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see where creating a thick paste for application would be useful but the problem really is the melting of the form during glaze firing.  How would this fine particle ball clay help in that area?

 

all ancient deities have beards

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On January 6, 2019 at 10:59 AM, docweathers said:

 

 

Would adding alumina hydrate help the glaze keep its form.?  I know it might cause some roughness. Any solution to this?

 

Right idea, wrong ingredient.  New terminology: " refractory glaze."  The C6 premise of adding up to 20% ball clay; need to go just above that 25-30%.  The high CEC will make a paste, the added alumina (ball clay) will hold its shape (refractory). Just theory; you are the test guinea pig. Dr. Frankenstein will go to his laboratory and mix it up for you; try not to get it in your beard.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, PSC said:

Don't let your kiln goddess hear you talking like that ;)

Sometimes I think I'm plagued with kiln devils not goddesses. But I think it's my fault because I'm constantly experimenting with new glazes and glaze combinations. Of course some of don't come out like I hoped. If Iris smart guy I would get 1/2 a dozen glazes I like and use them. But what fun would that be.

 

On 1/10/2019 at 2:21 PM, glazenerd said:

try not to get it in your beard.

Gee I thought the best way to measure CEC was by taste but of course that sometimes puts it in my beard. My wife hates it when I give her a big kiss with a beard full of clay, but what fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doc, I don't think you can have a glaze that stands up and holds its shape like frosting (too fluid when melted), but white earthenware clay , thinned out a bit to act like buttercream in a pastry tube, would hold its shape and probably self-glaze when overfired. At least it has for me. You'd have to do some tests.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.