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DMCosta

Clay Bust Instructional Recommendation

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Hi Everyone, 

I've dove into uncharted territory and started making clay self-portrait busts. I'm excited about it-and I know a little about it such as the armature usage.  HoweverI need help with the  properly sculpting the face and where to add and remove clay for accuracy. I've watched some you tube videos and I've learned a bit but I'd love to use a book.

Anyone have any recommendations on a book to how to sculpt the face properly? I've also tried finding some local portrait bust workshops but haven't had any luck because I'd need a one day workshop because of my busy life.  Thank you!

~Dianna

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Dianna-

take a look at Bruno Lucchesi’s book: “Modeling the Head in Clay: Creative Techniques for the Sculptor “. Link below, but may not be the best price.

He doesn’t talk about firing processes and the considerations that must be taken into account if that is your objective. He does however give an excellent account of the process of sculpting and the “whys” that the face and head take the forms that they have.

https://www.amazon.com/Modeling-Head-Clay-Creative-Techniques-ebook/dp/B004KABEHO

Regards,

Fred

 

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Dianna-

Another possible reference is Alex Irvine’s book: “Ceramic Sculpture: Making Faces: A Guide to Modeling the Head and Face with Clay”.

I don’t have personal experience with this book, and only offer it as an option after doing a quick search on the web.

https://www.amazon.com/Ceramic-Sculpture-Making-Faces-Modeling/dp/1454707763

Regards,

Fred

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I don't do sculpture anymore, but many years ago one thing I did to learn doing heads/faces was to make a cast of my own face, from a plaster mold, made from a hand-pressed thin slab carefully covering my face (vaselined very  lightly around removal points at temples/jaw). Did the same thing with a male, for those general proportions. Touching/studying these "masks" (what they evolved into) like a blind person helped me "feel" my away around facial structure. Came in handy when actually modeling faces.

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