Jump to content
Palmtree

How is this made?

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I am new at this forum, but not completely new to ceramics and pottery. I am however a complete newbie when it comes to decorating. I have glazed my work in the simplest way possible, but I have been thinking about combining my other hobby- painting- into my ceramics practice. I find painted pottery very beautiful, but I have no idea how to do it. I found some images of the work of a Norwegian artist called Dørge Berg, attached under. Does anyone have an idea of the technique that can have been used? I know that one can paint with underglazes and slips, but this looks so intricate. How is this, and delicate china-paintings done? Any tips would be very appreciated!!

AJ-17-181.jpg

l_461198219.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really? So, after bisque firing, underglaze is applied, then dried, then pattern with underglaze, fire it and transparent glaze in top and fire it again? I though this was slip, because glaze to me is very thick and not detailed. But then again, what do I know about this. Actually very little!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is obviously a LOT of time and skill involved in decorating these pieces and underglazes would be the place to start. You say you are also a painter. With that in mind I would suggest that you start with some small items and experiment with various underglazes and patterns. You might find that you can use underglaze like watercolors. Give it a shot and let us know how things work out...

JohnnyK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That could definitely be done with underglazes. You can apply them to leather hard, bone dry, or bisque. Some brands of underglazes have a lot of binders and hardeners in them that make it difficult to get a dipping glaze to stick to well, so if you're using dipping glazes I recommend applying the underglazes to leather hard or bone dry. In the bisque firing the binders will burn out. We've seen Amaco Velvets do that. Speedball doesn't seem to be a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I paint in underglaze. I use a variety of sizes of brush, including very small. 

If you do it on greenware, you cannot "erase it." If you do it on bisque and don't like it, you can wash it off.

I usually do some of the larger areas on greenware and the details after bisque.  

When you do the painting on bisque and then do clear glaze in the same step, you need to be careful not to smear. I actually brush/dab on the first layer of clear.

I bought a book when I first started decorating called Making Marks. You might like to take a look at it. There are other good references too on surface treatment.

Some people do decorating with transfers. I have not done that personally but many people here know how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Gabby said:

If you do it on bisque and don't like it, you can wash it off.

Depends on the color and the brand. Some colors are very saturated and will not wipe off completely and will leave a stained area. For instance, with the Speedball underglazes I use, the Royal Blue and Black will stain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why do you all think it is underglaze and not slip?   it really looks like a thin slip to me.  the amount of water makes a real difference when you paint in a watercolor way.  the darker flowers and the rim might be a little thicker.  the rim might have been gone over several times.  both the brown and green look like slip

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps majolica -particularly that white plate - which I'm understanding typically refers to decoration applied over/on the glaze (before firing, o'course), see

https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/daily/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-glazing-techniques/the-magic-of-majolicamaiolica-how-to-create-vibrant-painterly-decoration-on-pottery/ 

https://www.thatsarte.com/blog/highlights/the-difference-between-pottery-ceramics-and-majolica-with-special-regard-to-italian-ceramics/

...where the glaze doesn't move much, and the painted stains pretty much stay put as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it to be underglaze used over the glaze, known as inglaze  sometimes majolica though use here has stricter definitions. I use it often when I want to keep the strength of color of the underglaze, but want a watercolor like effect. I may be wrong, but that is my best assessment. The problem with the technique is that you have to be careful with the your base glaze formula and the formulas of your underglazes as with any use since tin opacifiers in the base glaze may act adversely with chrome and other oxides. Zircopax is a good opacifier even though cooler than the tin.

Personal opinion here, but . . . .

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone and thank you for your ideas and suggestions! I did not expect to get so much help - but this is really instructive and helpful! I will start experimenting soon. I absolutely get that the skill behind the examples i posted is great, but I really wanted to know where to start, because the technique appeals to me: it looks fun, and a lot similar to my own painting style. Thanks again everyone! If I manage to get around all of this glazes, underglazes, slips and majolica I will absolutely post it:) I found these answers so helpful that I´ve actually crammed them into a document that I printed out: that is how it has to be when you are the only english speaking person at a pottery club.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with all but guess that is underglaze (mostly) have a look at polish pottery which use underglazes and original artistic designs then they are hand painted and custom stamps are made. I believe there are a few videos that show the start to finish process. Very ornate and very intricate hand painting. 

A few artists in our studio are brush artists so we have spent time making glaze formulations that do not interfere with their color and artistry.

a couple pictures attached here. Right now I am working on making sure a clear glaze will not affect a 15” decorative platter that is 100% underglaze painted  with very fine intricate brush strokes. Beautiful piece but the extent of the painting on the surface will cause absorbency issues for the glaze and the glaze could alter or bleach the colors so test away we go.

D73B0F4D-0882-4A8D-8352-14E6414B3B9A.jpeg

D0674F1D-5ECE-428A-8A49-6F8BCBE61455.jpeg

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Palmtree decided to cover much of the piece with  underglaze, is there a way to prevent the issue of glaze not absorbing through the underglaze? Would this issue be different if the underglaze is put on greenware rather than bisque ware? Would it help to let the underglaze dry longer than usual?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Selchie said:

If Palmtree decided to cover much of the piece with  underglaze, is there a way to prevent the issue of glaze not absorbing through the underglaze? Would this issue be different if the underglaze is put on greenware rather than bisque ware? Would it help to let the underglaze dry longer than usual?

I haven't had any issues putting Duncan concepts or amaco velvets on greenware and then glazing over it.  Would kind of defeat the purpose of underglaze if it was a big problem.  I haven't used underglaze on bisque so I can't comment there, but don't see why it would be much different as long as they were glazed once the underglaze was dry.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Applying to green ware and bisqueing does sinter the underglaze which does improve absobancy. I always spray these items when I can and spray them very evenly often heating them a bit in advance and building my glaze coats  as if painting a car.   The underglaze will change the porosity or “packed bed porosity” as some say so my best success has been the  preheating and even spraying approach for fine work.

I have  had success with brushing  over the underglaze as well, usually on the insides of fully underglazed vessels. Heating has been helpful and of course careful even  buildup of the overglaze has also been successful.

interesting note in that thick applications of some underglaze colors, usually black and blue become refractory and can present as underfired in these locations  so we have reformulated some clear glazes to address these areas so they fully melt. Commercial underglazes likely contain clay and maybe Frit so they will add silica to the area. If the overglaze is a matte and tolerant then these areas often go glossy just in this area of color.

anything that aides in the application of a smooth uniform overglaze thickness is helpful is my experienceso heating is a plus.

 

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, liambesaw said:

I haven't had any issues putting Duncan concepts or amaco velvets on greenware and then glazing over it.  Would kind of defeat the purpose of underglaze if it was a big problem.  I haven't used underglaze on bisque so I can't comment there, but don't see why it would be much different as long as they were glazed once the underglaze was dry.  

It works all ways but greenware is a little easier and maybe a little more absorbent in the end. Complete surface coverage and heavy underglaze applications  often do pose a  challenge especially on fine wares where surface imperfections are not tolerated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.