Jump to content
Apocalypticamerica

Amaco Palladium on mugs

Recommended Posts

I knew my Amaco Blue Midnight glaze was food safe, but I since I'm a big dummy I forgot to check the label and layered quite a bit of dinnerware with Palladium over it.  I now see it's not food safe.  I obviously am not going to give out any of these, but I'm wondering if some of the pieces with just a little on the rim might be in the realm of "safe enough" to use on my own, with caution?  

 

 

Edited by Apocalypticamerica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(not food safe) says it all.This is a gray area but its your grey area if you use them.Whats the unsafe materials-I'm guessing they do not list them?The ones that are really bad are cadmium, and Lead

lesser things are Antimony, barium, cobalt,  lithium, manganese

this may help

https://digitalfire.com/4sight/education/being_realistic_about_toxicity_and_safety_in_ceramics_278.html

Edited by Mark C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Acids make for faster leaching.

You have yet to say what metals they are?

I would not drink from a known leaching glaze.

Another approach is to use acid foods to make them leach for awhile (throw acid foods out afterwards) then most toxics may be gone. This may take some time.The thinking is there is only a limited amount of material to be leached after that its about moot.

Its gamble -

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the Safety Data Sheet for Palladium, it contains up to 5% of both copper oxide and manganese dioxide.  No clue if the base glaze is stable but even if it was it will be made unstable by the high amounts of colourants used to make such a metallic finish. Dishwasher detergent can degrade unstable glazes also. Can you be sure the pots won’t be used by others in the future for coffee etc? 

I wouldn’t use them either. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to toss a large majority of the unsafe ones.  I don't really trust them to not be used down the line if I hand them out to friends.  

If it had been less work, I wouldn't have thought twice about it, but it was almost two full kiln loads worth of pots.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it makes you feel any better I lost a 35 cubic foot car kiln bisque load once-(fell over) at least two 10 cubic electric loads (all bisque overtired )

and at least 3- 35 cubic foot glaze loads(two where bad clay and one was an 7.0 earthquake)

whats a few electric loads really in the long run.

Remember ceramics can kick your butt at any moment

anyhow is not part of your name  the end of something?-maybe it was those pots?

You just need to keep making the wares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Babs said:

Can you drill holes in bottom and use for succulents etc.

Stuck together for a divider in your garden,,,,

Stuck together  water feature...

How about drilling them and using them as head pieces for wind chimes? You could also make the chime pieces in the form of thin rods or tubes...

Hmmm... I think I have the basis for a new winter project or even a COMMUNITY CHALLENGE ...

JohnnyK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/29/2018 at 12:42 AM, Apocalypticamerica said:

*sigh* I guess it's time to face the music.  I already knew the answer, I guess I just needed to hear some other people say it. 

Join the club..most of us wish at one time or another that there is "another, softer way". But there is not. I found it important to my growth and training to work at getting over viewing things as too "precious" --becasue that very best piece will break, that plate will be unsafe, that beautifully thrown mug will have ugly flaws, that amazing glaze will be on a piece that is too wonky to justify. I send them to meet Mr. Hammer and decorate my fairy garden with selected sherds or use them mosaic-like in another format (first I Dremel the broken edges so they are not cutting sharp).  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/28/2018 at 7:58 PM, liambesaw said:

Instead of using them for food or drink you could use them for keys or pocket change, a nice bowl for your throwing water, etc.  They're not safe for food

But you can never tell what uses they'll have when they leave your hands. Keys and change will scratch the palladium. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Rae Reich said:

But you can never tell what uses they'll have when they leave your hands. Keys and change will scratch the palladium. 

Yeah at the time I didn't realize he had an entire kiln load to find a use for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.