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tomhumf

Rubber stamp for bottom of bisque

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I'm thinking of getting a rubber stamp made with my company name. Mainly for stamping boxes and stuff. Then I thought maybe I could use it for the bottom of mugs etc.

Has anyone had experience of stamping bisque with rubber stamps? I would just want black lettering, so would just mix some black iron oxide with some water, and soak a sponge in it to dip stamp in? 

Thanks 

Edited by tomhumf

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No I meant bleed together, I don't know what kind of stamp you've got or how detailed it is, but if I mix black iron oxide and water and put it on bisque it spreads out and bleeds, like capillary action.

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There are lots of people that use a rubber stamp on the bottom of their pots, but they stamp them while wet to make an impression. It's a good idea to dip the stamp in cornstarch or plain flour first, as a release. It makes a nice clean mark. I know Mea (GEP) uses one on all her work.

If you've got a logo that would be a nuisance to carve into plaster or model yourself, it's definitely a lot easier to send the job to a print shop that makes rubber stamps.

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from Minnesota clay  https://www.mnclay.com  quote:

"Potter's Pads are an underglaze stamping ink. Use regular rubber stamps to decorate your pots, or use Safety Cut printing blocks to make your own design. Now you can use regular rubber stamps to decorate your pots!  Our underglaze stamp pads are available in 9 colors and can be fired from Cone 06 to Cone 9, except for White and Gold which only fire to Cone 8."

a colleague has has used these stamps and pads  and they work, sorta.  You need a smooth flat spot on which to stamp and the right  fonts too get a readable image. 

The 'ink' needs a carrier fluid that has wets the surface, but does not flow get pulled into the pores like water does.  I have good luck with a homemade thick mix of water,  red iron oxide, and manganese oxide that I use to mark my pots with a fine watercolor brush.  It does not spread on bisque ware.  

The idea is feasible,  Try, it. 

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stamps made of rubber are not worth it if you intend to impress into the clay.   there are plastic stamps that are stronger but metal is best for this.  a quick press into clay is much easier than using an ink type stamp on bisque.

if you really only want to use some kind of ink substitute, it will have to be fired on to last through dishwashing.   it will take a lot of practice to get it on clearly without smearing it.

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I have used rubber stamps on bisque ware quite a bit.  As was mentioned before, it's better on a flat surface but you can 'rock' the stamp on a curve and still get a good impression.  I was taught to make my own stamp pads with a sponge, a brush, and underglaze.  I use sponges I get from the hardware store for grouting, cut them up to the size I need, brush underglaze on the sponge and then tap tap tap your rubber stamp on the glazed sponge.  It works well, does not bleed, and is permanent.   You could slide the whole sponge into a zip lock bag and it would stay moist.

I have carved stamps out of clay and bisque fired them and those work well, I have a manufactured acrylic stamp that I use for a local business, there are lots of ways to achieve your end goal!  Good luck.

Roberta

 

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