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#1 Nelly

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:33 PM

This is my third posting on this forum.

I will be working in a studio where I will not have access directly to water. Thus, as pointed out by Marcia I will have to get creative with my plans for how to work in this situation. I am soooo glad she mentioned the emersion heater. I will look into that tomorrow.

Here is my next question...

What will I do with the water that has been used and I have decanted??

Can the clay water be put on the grass at the back of the house? Does ready made clay contain chemicals that will harm the grass or should I put this directly into the toilet in the house.

I know this sounds crazy but with all the environmental stuff happening right now, I want to make sure I am in keeping with others practice so I do not break laws or cause further damage to the earth.

Any thoughts.

Nelly

#2 Prokopp

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:46 PM

Throw it on the grass. All my throwing/wash water has been going on my back lawn for four years, and it doesn't hurt a thing.
After all, the clay came from the earth in the first place, so it's all okay.
Putting water with clay in it ( and no matter how clean it looks, there is always some in there) down the toilet will eventually clog your sewer line, and you will have to have it routed.
Besides, in order to put it down the toilet, you would have to carry it in from the garage, and you know what that means...eventually you will spill or drop it, and then you will have clay dust in your house. not much, but some.

#3 Nelly

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 07:52 PM

Throw it on the grass. All my throwing/wash water has been going on my back lawn for six years, and it doesn't hurt a thing.
After all, the clay came from the earth in the first place, so it's all okay.
Putting water with clay in it ( and no matter how clean it looks, there is always some in there) down the toilet will eventually clog your sewer line, and you will have to have it routed.
Besides, in order to put it down the toilet, you would have to carry it in from the garage, and you know what that means...eventually you will psill or drop it, and then you will have clay dust in your house. not much, but some.



Thank you so much for this advice. I never thought about that (i.e., toilet drain clogging). It is funny the things we take for granted when we are working in a none private studio. My water then, will go on the grass. I do not need any unnecessary plumbing bills.

Nelly

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:56 PM


Throw it on the grass. All my throwing/wash water has been going on my back lawn for six years, and it doesn't hurt a thing.
After all, the clay came from the earth in the first place, so it's all okay.
Putting water with clay in it ( and no matter how clean it looks, there is always some in there) down the toilet will eventually clog your sewer line, and you will have to have it routed.
Besides, in order to put it down the toilet, you would have to carry it in from the garage, and you know what that means...eventually you will psill or drop it, and then you will have clay dust in your house. not much, but some.



Thank you so much for this advice. I never thought about that (i.e., toilet drain clogging). It is funny the things we take for granted when we are working in a none private studio. My water then, will go on the grass. I do not need any unnecessary plumbing bills.

Nelly


Grass not toilet for same reasons as above-clay will clog your drains over time.
Mark
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#5 minspargal

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:44 AM

I throw mine out in the grass and the bonus was that my dog no longer got fleas. Throwing it in the toilet, is the same as throwing it down your sink..$$$ plumbing repairs.

#6 TJR

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:27 AM

I mixed glazes in my backyard once-stoneware glazes. I used the garden hose to wash the rinse water into the lawn. I killed the grass real good. There is a differance between clay and glazes. The chemicals in glaze are not good for your lawn. If you could, I would dump the water on a gravel driveway ,or between the garage and the fence-less obtrusive.
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#7 Nelly

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 10:42 AM

I mixed glazes in my backyard once-stoneware glazes. I used the garden hose to wash the rinse water into the lawn. I killed the grass real good. There is a differance between clay and glazes. The chemicals in glaze are not good for your lawn. If you could, I would dump the water on a gravel driveway ,or between the garage and the fence-less obtrusive.
TJR.


Dear TJR,

After receiving the posts yesterday, I have decided to designate an area (as you said--between the garage and the fence) where there is gravel and this will be where I put my clay water. This way, I will not upset the grass or garden. Thank you for reminding me about glaze though. I never thought about that??? Right now, I am forcing myself to work with only two glazes in the initial stages of my new studio. I am used to access to a variety of glaze in the cooperative where I used to work and having this limited amount will really force me to watch the kiln and the effects I can get with different colorants. So yeah, no glaze on the lawn. GOOD POINT and one I have never even thought about given that I am used to working in a cooperative where such issues were just handled by way of the drain in the studio. Thank you so much for this tip.

Nelly

#8 JBaymore

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 12:12 PM

The best setup we've found at the college is a series of settling barrels in which you wash things off. The sink is the last place things get done... and is basically "not used" much. The size of these barrels can be determined by your available space and the volume of work that you do (and how often you want to deal with the actual cleaning of the barrels and water disposal Posted Image ).

You'll need two "sets" of these. One for the clay washup and one for the glaze washup.

Real "throwing slop" should go into its own barrel and be reclaimed for re-use. No sense throwing out money (useable clay)!

After doing things like throwing, you wash your really dirty hands and tools in the first clay wash barrel. Then you do the second cleaning rinse in the second clay wash barrel. By the time you've done this there is almost nothing left to clean off in the "sink". Multiple times a week put a little clorox bleach into these barrels to keep the bacterial growth down (bleach loses its effectiveness with exposiure of the water surface to the air).

The same idea approach goes for the glaze clean up set of barrels.

The only time you wash anything down the "sink" (or toilet in this case) is the last minimal leftovers ....... which wil be almost nothing. More a "sanitary cleanup" with soap on hands and such. Clay and glaze materials down the drain will plug up sewer lines and septic leach fields quickly.

Then the first clay wash one can be replaced with a new clean water barrel periodically, and these older dirty barrels are left to settle out the heavier particles. The very slightly clay-ey water that accumuulated on top of the sediments can be safely discarded in your garden area. The sediment can either be reclaimed for re-use, or allowed to dry out and taken to the landfill / dump for safe disposal.

Unless you are using colored clays with lots of colorants in them, or a clay body with manganese dioxide (often added for oxidation use) it does not have anything of real environmental concern in it. The second clay wash barrel does not need to be cleaned as often, but you simply do the same thing.

The glaze clean up is treated the same for the first settling aspects.

However, depending on the specific chemistry of the glazes you use, the disposal of the sediments can become a bit more problematic. As a home studio, you are almost for sure WELL under volume of wastes for the EPA regulations on a pollution source to be in effect. But those wastes DO have the potential to cause some pollution depending on how they are disposed.

If all of your glazes conmtain non-toxic materials, then they are basically safe to dispose of in your garden. If all the sediment is is ground feldspar, calcium carbonate, clays, iron oxide and the like... then it is not an issue. However if you use anthing like copper, cobalt, manganese, barium, certain frits, and so on... then that is another story.

You want to REALLY allow this glaze wash bucket to settle until the water on top is pretty darn clear. Decant that off and discard (Note here... if you use soluble ingredients like soda ash...... don't just pour this "clear water" stuff on your lawn or down the drain. Let it evaporate instead of decanting.) Then let rest of the the water air evaporate. After decanting off the water and evaporating, the glaze sediments can be allowed to dry fully and then disposed of.

One technique to do this disposal is to make some VERY thick bisqued bowls and place the dry glaze sediment into them. Then fire the bowls full of junk (VERY SLOWLY) to a temperature that causes the mass to SLIGHTLY sinter into a semi-fused hard mass. Not going to a puddle of molten glass!!!!! This ties up the materials from getting into the environment a bit and makes taking them to a landfill / dump reasonably "acceptable" from a pollution standpoint.

Since you are not "regulated" on this stuff ... this is legal.

Another technique for a non-selling home hobby studio is to take either the fired lumps (from the above idea) or the simple dried lumps of sediment to a "Household Hazardous Waste " day at the local dump / recycling center.
If you asre not selling (being a business) then they will take it.

If you are a business (selling your work) the "household" days are not really a legal way to dispose of this stuff. Technically in this case, you need to dispose of this type of material with a hazardous waste contractor if your dump won't accept it. But since the volume is under the regulatory limits for even a small professional studio... your dump should likely accept it.

Another approach on using up the glaze wastes that accumulate is to settle it out and call it "mystery glaze". Usually they are rather interesting. They are a belnd of everything you use. Just don't use it on the food contact surfaces of functional ware.

Hope these thoughts maybe help.

best,

.......................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#9 Jeri

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 12:34 PM

Another approach on using up the glaze wastes that accumulate is to settle it out and call it "mystery glaze". Usually they are rather interesting. They are a belnd of everything you use. Just don't use it on the food contact surfaces of functional ware.

Hope these thoughts maybe help.

best,

.......................john
[/quote]


Talking about the mystery glaze prompts me to ask another question along the same line only for "mystery clay". I don't mix my own glaze yet, for a few reasons, but, I do reclaim my clays. The studio where I rent space and take classes at use to reclaim all slurry and clay trimmings, mixing them all together and selling it as 'student clay'. I'm not sure why they stopped doing so. I've always wondered just how safe this practice is? I currently have six different clays, each one has a slightly different shrinkage rate, all are ^6 stoneware. I'm trying to figure out which I like best for what type of project I'm working on, and have considered doing the same thing just for the learning experience, but have been a little afraid to try it.

I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts and opinions!
Jeri Lynne

#10 Matt Oz

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 12:53 PM

As JBaymore described above, I also Use wash barrels, the only thing I would like to add is I sprinkle some plaster into the water and stir, which quickly settles the particles, and continues to do so for some time.

#11 Diana Ferreira

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 12:58 PM

Hi, there.
Get a simple sedimentation system in your studio going. Get 2 large plastic containers, fit one directly underneath your sink outlet. A connector placed near the top of the container connects it to the next container. as dirty water flows into the container, sediment will settle in the bottom of the container. In the next container more sediment will settle. On the other side of the last container, add an outlet that connects to your sewerage. Clean the containers every few weeks (when it starts to smell!) BUT, never ever put any food stuff down this system. It will pong you out of the studio in no time!

To make it easier to work with, put both containers on a dolly so that you can wheel it and work with it easier during cleaning, etc.
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#12 Nelly

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:11 PM

The best setup we've found at the college is a series of settling barrels in which you wash things off. The sink is the last place things get done... and is basically "not used" much. The size of these barrels can be determined by your available space and the volume of work that you do (and how often you want to deal with the actual cleaning of the barrels and water disposal Posted Image ).

You'll need two "sets" of these. One for the clay washup and one for the glaze washup.

Real "throwing slop" should go into its own barrel and be reclaimed for re-use. No sense throwing out money (useable clay)!

After doing things like throwing, you wash your really dirty hands and tools in the first clay wash barrel. Then you do the second cleaning rinse in the second clay wash barrel. By the time you've done this there is almost nothing left to clean off in the "sink". Multiple times a week put a little clorox bleach into these barrels to keep the bacterial growth down (bleach loses its effectiveness with exposiure of the water surface to the air).

The same idea approach goes for the glaze clean up set of barrels.

The only time you wash anything down the "sink" (or toilet in this case) is the last minimal leftovers ....... which wil be almost nothing. More a "sanitary cleanup" with soap on hands and such. Clay and glaze materials down the drain will plug up sewer lines and septic leach fields quickly.

Then the first clay wash one can be replaced with a new clean water barrel periodically, and these older dirty barrels are left to settle out the heavier particles. The very slightly clay-ey water that accumuulated on top of the sediments can be safely discarded in your garden area. The sediment can either be reclaimed for re-use, or allowed to dry out and taken to the landfill / dump for safe disposal.

Unless you are using colored clays with lots of colorants in them, or a clay body with manganese dioxide (often added for oxidation use) it does not have anything of real environmental concern in it. The second clay wash barrel does not need to be cleaned as often, but you simply do the same thing.

The glaze clean up is treated the same for the first settling aspects.

However, depending on the specific chemistry of the glazes you use, the disposal of the sediments can become a bit more problematic. As a home studio, you are almost for sure WELL under volume of wastes for the EPA regulations on a pollution source to be in effect. But those wastes DO have the potential to cause some pollution depending on how they are disposed.

If all of your glazes conmtain non-toxic materials, then they are basically safe to dispose of in your garden. If all the sediment is is ground feldspar, calcium carbonate, clays, iron oxide and the like... then it is not an issue. However if you use anthing like copper, cobalt, manganese, barium, certain frits, and so on... then that is another story.

You want to REALLY allow this glaze wash bucket to settle until the water on top is pretty darn clear. Decant that off and discard (Note here... if you use soluble ingredients like soda ash...... don't just pour this "clear water" stuff on your lawn or down the drain. Let it evaporate instead of decanting.) Then let rest of the the water air evaporate. After decanting off the water and evaporating, the glaze sediments can be allowed to dry fully and then disposed of.

One technique to do this disposal is to make some VERY thick bisqued bowls and place the dry glaze sediment into them. Then fire the bowls full of junk (VERY SLOWLY) to a temperature that causes the mass to SLIGHTLY sinter into a semi-fused hard mass. Not going to a puddle of molten glass!!!!! This ties up the materials from getting into the environment a bit and makes taking them to a landfill / dump reasonably "acceptable" from a pollution standpoint.

Since you are not "regulated" on this stuff ... this is legal.

Another technique for a non-selling home hobby studio is to take either the fired lumps (from the above idea) or the simple dried lumps of sediment to a "Household Hazardous Waste " day at the local dump / recycling center.
If you asre not selling (being a business) then they will take it.

If you are a business (selling your work) the "household" days are not really a legal way to dispose of this stuff. Technically in this case, you need to dispose of this type of material with a hazardous waste contractor if your dump won't accept it. But since the volume is under the regulatory limits for even a small professional studio... your dump should likely accept it.

Another approach on using up the glaze wastes that accumulate is to settle it out and call it "mystery glaze". Usually they are rather interesting. They are a belnd of everything you use. Just don't use it on the food contact surfaces of functional ware.

Hope these thoughts maybe help.

best,

.......................john


Dear John,


Wow!!! Thank you so much for that incredible reply to my post. You have answered so many questions for me. This is a publishable post!!!

You know it is funny how I never thought about how to rinse glaze items. In my past studio, everything just went into two barrels. Clay and glaze refuse.

I am a big recycler of clay though. So it does make sense to use this barreling system and the sink as the last resort or you put it "sanitary area."

In the past, in my cooperative studio, we put all the old sludge (i.e., from both the wheels and glaze) into the same bucket. Everyday both would be decanted (first person in must take the water off). Once a week, this clay/glaze sludge was scooped into those big aluminum pans you use to cook lasagna and was placed under each kiln. The clay would eventually turn to bricks. These bricks were then simply thrown out with the garbage.

I am now, however, seeing that if I set up four buckets for both stations I should be laughing. That will definitely work.

I like the tip about the bleach. The last thing I want is bacterial or fungal growth in my water--let alone West Nile. So yeah, great suggestions. And I think if it is only me in the studio I will likely be hypervigilent about decanting.

I found your comment about air evaporation interesting. Again, I never thought about either. It makes sense. On days where it is 80-90 degrees, this water from the glaze buckets could simply be put in the air to dry fully and evaporate.

Thus, in summary, what I have learned from you is: 1) the bucket system; 2) understanding glaze ingredients that could be harmful to the environment and 3) investigate the municipalities laws regarding hazardous waste and/or dump rules.

I will not be using manganese clay or speckled clay. I will be using some manganese likely on the exterior of pots from time to time but nothing like Hans...oh I forget his name??? Sorry, but I am sure you know who I mean. But I do need to really familiarize myself on the list of toxic ingredients in clay work.

Right now, I have ordered one commercial glaze and another that I know well from my old studio. The second glaze Tucker's here in Ontario is mixing for me. This means, right now, I do not have a lot of dry product around.

I did order a number of oxides though to use with these glazes. It is these oxides that I need to really understand in terms of their toxicity.

So many things to think about in setting up my studio.

But know that I am almost there and ready to begin hobby level production.

Again, thank you Mark for posting this for me. You have made me think of a few more things that I hadn't anticipated. Thank you.

Nelly

#13 JBaymore

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:13 PM

.......... fit one directly underneath your sink outlet.


Unfortunately, she did not say she actually has a sink in the studio. That is why she mentioned having to flush stuff down the house toilet.

I have also a somewhat similar trap system to what you describe there that I built in my studio. The one difference is that I have a larger restaraunt type stainless sink with multiple bays, and one of the bays has a stand pipe in it that helps to settle out the largers stuff there....then that drain goes into the baffeled settling trap.

best,

.....................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#14 Nelly

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:13 PM


The best setup we've found at the college is a series of settling barrels in which you wash things off. The sink is the last place things get done... and is basically "not used" much. The size of these barrels can be determined by your available space and the volume of work that you do (and how often you want to deal with the actual cleaning of the barrels and water disposal Posted Image ).

You'll need two "sets" of these. One for the clay washup and one for the glaze washup.

Real "throwing slop" should go into its own barrel and be reclaimed for re-use. No sense throwing out money (useable clay)!

After doing things like throwing, you wash your really dirty hands and tools in the first clay wash barrel. Then you do the second cleaning rinse in the second clay wash barrel. By the time you've done this there is almost nothing left to clean off in the "sink". Multiple times a week put a little clorox bleach into these barrels to keep the bacterial growth down (bleach loses its effectiveness with exposiure of the water surface to the air).

The same idea approach goes for the glaze clean up set of barrels.

The only time you wash anything down the "sink" (or toilet in this case) is the last minimal leftovers ....... which wil be almost nothing. More a "sanitary cleanup" with soap on hands and such. Clay and glaze materials down the drain will plug up sewer lines and septic leach fields quickly.

Then the first clay wash one can be replaced with a new clean water barrel periodically, and these older dirty barrels are left to settle out the heavier particles. The very slightly clay-ey water that accumuulated on top of the sediments can be safely discarded in your garden area. The sediment can either be reclaimed for re-use, or allowed to dry out and taken to the landfill / dump for safe disposal.

Unless you are using colored clays with lots of colorants in them, or a clay body with manganese dioxide (often added for oxidation use) it does not have anything of real environmental concern in it. The second clay wash barrel does not need to be cleaned as often, but you simply do the same thing.

The glaze clean up is treated the same for the first settling aspects.

However, depending on the specific chemistry of the glazes you use, the disposal of the sediments can become a bit more problematic. As a home studio, you are almost for sure WELL under volume of wastes for the EPA regulations on a pollution source to be in effect. But those wastes DO have the potential to cause some pollution depending on how they are disposed.

If all of your glazes conmtain non-toxic materials, then they are basically safe to dispose of in your garden. If all the sediment is is ground feldspar, calcium carbonate, clays, iron oxide and the like... then it is not an issue. However if you use anthing like copper, cobalt, manganese, barium, certain frits, and so on... then that is another story.

You want to REALLY allow this glaze wash bucket to settle until the water on top is pretty darn clear. Decant that off and discard (Note here... if you use soluble ingredients like soda ash...... don't just pour this "clear water" stuff on your lawn or down the drain. Let it evaporate instead of decanting.) Then let rest of the the water air evaporate. After decanting off the water and evaporating, the glaze sediments can be allowed to dry fully and then disposed of.

One technique to do this disposal is to make some VERY thick bisqued bowls and place the dry glaze sediment into them. Then fire the bowls full of junk (VERY SLOWLY) to a temperature that causes the mass to SLIGHTLY sinter into a semi-fused hard mass. Not going to a puddle of molten glass!!!!! This ties up the materials from getting into the environment a bit and makes taking them to a landfill / dump reasonably "acceptable" from a pollution standpoint.

Since you are not "regulated" on this stuff ... this is legal.

Another technique for a non-selling home hobby studio is to take either the fired lumps (from the above idea) or the simple dried lumps of sediment to a "Household Hazardous Waste " day at the local dump / recycling center.
If you asre not selling (being a business) then they will take it.

If you are a business (selling your work) the "household" days are not really a legal way to dispose of this stuff. Technically in this case, you need to dispose of this type of material with a hazardous waste contractor if your dump won't accept it. But since the volume is under the regulatory limits for even a small professional studio... your dump should likely accept it.

Another approach on using up the glaze wastes that accumulate is to settle it out and call it "mystery glaze". Usually they are rather interesting. They are a belnd of everything you use. Just don't use it on the food contact surfaces of functional ware.

Hope these thoughts maybe help.

best,

.......................john


Dear John,


Wow!!! Thank you so much for that incredible reply to my post. You have answered so many questions for me. This is a publishable post!!!

You know it is funny how I never thought about how to rinse glaze items. In my past studio, everything just went into two barrels. Clay and glaze refuse.

I am a big recycler of clay though. So it does make sense to use this barreling system and the sink as the last resort or you put it "sanitary area."

In the past, in my cooperative studio, we put all the old sludge (i.e., from both the wheels and glaze) into the same bucket. Everyday both would be decanted (first person in must take the water off). Once a week, this clay/glaze sludge was scooped into those big aluminum pans you use to cook lasagna and was placed under each kiln. The clay would eventually turn to bricks. These bricks were then simply thrown out with the garbage.

I am now, however, seeing that if I set up four buckets for both stations I should be laughing. That will definitely work.

I like the tip about the bleach. The last thing I want is bacterial or fungal growth in my water--let alone West Nile. So yeah, great suggestions. And I think if it is only me in the studio I will likely be hypervigilent about decanting.

I found your comment about air evaporation interesting. Again, I never thought about either. It makes sense. On days where it is 80-90 degrees, this water from the glaze buckets could simply be put in the air to dry fully and evaporate.

Thus, in summary, what I have learned from you is: 1) the bucket system; 2) understanding glaze ingredients that could be harmful to the environment and 3) investigate the municipalities laws regarding hazardous waste and/or dump rules.

I will not be using manganese clay or speckled clay. I will be using some manganese likely on the exterior of pots from time to time but nothing like Hans...oh I forget his name??? Sorry, but I am sure you know who I mean. But I do need to really familiarize myself on the list of toxic ingredients in clay work.

Right now, I have ordered one commercial glaze and another that I know well from my old studio. The second glaze Tucker's here in Ontario is mixing for me. This means, right now, I do not have a lot of dry product around.

I did order a number of oxides though to use with these glazes. It is these oxides that I need to really understand in terms of their toxicity.

So many things to think about in setting up my studio.

But know that I am almost there and ready to begin hobby level production.

Again, thank you Mark for posting this for me. You have made me think of a few more things that I hadn't anticipated. Thank you.

Nelly



Dear John,

Sorry, I just noticed I called you Mark in that last entry. My sincere apologies. I must have replied to Mark earlier. Sorry about that John.

Nelly

#15 Diana Ferreira

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 01:56 PM

Hi John, thanks your for pointing out my glaring misreading of a post!

At a previous studio we had the system as I described above. At present I am using a 2 bucket system at my workstation, until we have a sedimentation system installed. Always a dirty and clean slop bucket. I empty the 'clean' water from both buckets every day into the sink and after I cleaned the bucket with about an inch of water in it, I pour the dirty clay water into another bucket (first thing in the morning). This bucket is left to get more and more deposits of clay particles, until there is full of clay deposits. I then decant the sludge into a used plastic bag, seal it, and it goes out with the dirt.
Diana
www.dianaferreiraceramics.com
https://www.facebook...70824173&type=3

#16 Nelly

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 03:02 PM

Hi John, thanks your for pointing out my glaring misreading of a post!

At a previous studio we had the system as I described above. At present I am using a 2 bucket system at my workstation, until we have a sedimentation system installed. Always a dirty and clean slop bucket. I empty the 'clean' water from both buckets every day into the sink and after I cleaned the bucket with about an inch of water in it, I pour the dirty clay water into another bucket (first thing in the morning). This bucket is left to get more and more deposits of clay particles, until there is full of clay deposits. I then decant the sludge into a used plastic bag, seal it, and it goes out with the dirt.



Dear Diana and All,

Sorry about that. Maybe I wasn't clear in my expression of thought. Right now I do not have a sink at all. It is coming on Thursday.

I am installing a simple white washing sink with the drain attached to a bucket and will have two buckets at each of the clay and glaze.

I like the idea of conserving not only water but in recycling like minded clay bodies.

The sink, I have now decided will be a "sanitary" station. My handyman said this morning, he could do some sort of Y tubing from the outside hose into the studio. He said, "when I am done, you should be able to simply turn on the tap and water will come out without leaving the studio." Unfortunately, here in Ontario, it is cold right now. Thus, no matter what, I will be trucking water from the inside out. But after all is assembled I should have a port for water. It just won't be warm unless I can get an immersion heater installed.

But as I said I will primarily be using the bucket system, decanting and for the glazes water--evaporation. Two glaze buckets and two clay buckets (one for slurry and another for tool washing).

I hope this makes it a little more clear.

Thank you to all who posted back to me. I really appreciate the advice. It is interesting to hear how other studios run and are managed.

The good thing about my new studio is that at least it has heat. I ensured that I had a heater installed so it is a comfortable working environment. If worse comes to worse, I will boil water in the studio for throwing purposes. Nothing worse than cold water and throwing.

Nelly

#17 JLowes

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 03:35 PM

Hi all,

I don't know how much of a factor this would be for anyone, but since typical throwing slop has a lot of fine clay particles, and you throw out the water with a lot of fine clay particles on your lawn, you may turn your aerated soil into hard pan that water can't get through. I can't say how long this would take, as some areas are sandy, some clayey, and some have loam. With careful observation you may see a change in how the ground absorbs the water.

My studio has a lot of trees and a long-term drought, so I don't want to compromise the water getting to tree roots at all. I leave my throwing water bucket until it gets pretty thick (it actually lubes the pots better without saturating them in my opinion) and then decant the bucket after letting it settle some, let it sit for several days drying somewhat and dry to a good plastic state on a plaster slab. I use $1 plastic buckets, so I have quite a few. Very little clay leaves my studio, but I am not a production potter, so this is practical for me.

John


#18 Idaho Potter

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 04:42 PM

I, too, have a sedimentation setup with a double sink above double wash tubs. The wash tubs are set as low to the floor as possible--just enough to install a p-trap. The sinks each have an 18 inch straight pipe aimed at the wash tub below. The wash tubs each have an 18 inch stand pipe with 1/8th inch holes drilled all around in the upper five inches. The water from the sink goes straight into the wash tubs and because the pipes don't extend down into the wash tub water, there is very little turbulence. The clear water rises towards the drilled holes and seeps out and down the single drain.

I used this in my last studio for twenty years without ever having to call a plumber. It has been installed in my new studio for six years without a problem. When the sediment gets over two inches, I close off the upper sink, decant the excess water and let the sediment dry so I can toss it in the trash. If you want to look for plans, check out plaster sediment sinks as that is what mine is modeled on.

#19 Diana Ferreira

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:21 PM

Thanks Idaho. I tried to get some info on the web to describe this method, but Google'd Ceramic sedimentation system. and could not get any info.
Diana
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#20 Nelly

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:32 PM

Thanks Idaho. I tried to get some info on the web to describe this method, but Google'd Ceramic sedimentation system. and could not get any info.


Dear All,

In my boredom over reading week hholiday from teaching, I did some quick googling on studio sinks. This one here looks like a gurrrreat system but the price is for the rich and famous. Not me!!

Check it out:

http://www.bigcerami...ies/TheCink.htm

Nelly




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