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Patrick

Used hard brick gas catenary arch kiln build

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17 hours ago, Mark C. said:

Whatever they used to use should still work fine-just because the new stuff is plastic does not mean the old steel in no good. I have NEVER heard of this replacement deal unless the old is rusted up bad.

Yeah, no idea. 

I'm almost certain, we have what you mentioned, because the vertical section, coming out of the ground, where it goes into the garage, is that exact thing. 

I believe the notice we received, mentions, that type of piping has been found to corrode, or something along those lines. 

As I mentioned, I have not addressed the issue yet, and haven't heard much from our gas company since.  They put a tag, on that line, coming out of the meter, to indicate that it needs to be updated, but said tag came off years ago.

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We wrapped black 2" with tape and buried it 18". The only rust was where the weed eater chewed through the tape at ground level at the meter. A little expensive to fix that last year since I'm past my diy digging days.  Advise you to place bricks or blocks strategically to prevent accidental gardening incursions. 

Extending your slab toward the meter is maybe not wise for a raku location. Be sure to leave lots of clear area around the front for reduction cans, clearance for carrying hot pots with tongs and room for several human helper/participants. 

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I dunno, it's an contrary to logic, but no you can't by code use galvanized pipe for gas. I believe it's because of the galvanized coating fouling the threads.

You have to use black pipe. When we did our studio slab years ago, I used black pipe wrapped with the heavy mil black tape designed just for use with black pipe, and buried it 18" before the slab was poured. That is (was) code.

If I was to do it today in a short run to a raku kiln, I'd find that nice black plastic coated pipe, albeit, I bet it's expensive.

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THIS year, I had to abandon the original gas line to my 100 year old house. That's when I met the Mole Man. Newest technology. Dig holes 18" deep at strategic turning points and set loose the Mole. Little burrowing machine that makes a hole and installs the new plastic pipe. No trenching, it can go under house foundations and trees and the pipe is flexible enough to accommodate growing roots (says here). Only gets a seven year guarantee, although I'm not sure what kind of warranty I'd get with traditional pipe laying. 

Cost was by the foot and I have 85' between the meter and the house, so about $6000 altogether. Worth it. 

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As noted  above pipe rising up out of ground get wacked. My plastic wrapped black pipe has heard up well in theses situations. I have 6 of these risers on my property with the 2 inch.They all are in good shape. None are where I would hit them with a string trimmer.Most all my pipe where it comes out of ground gets sprayed with high heat silver paint to keep the heat off it from kilns-with the exception of a run that goes under house and comes out to underground to kiln area which is house point color.

You may want to get that pipe run roughed in before(at least bought and laid out on paper) you pour your slab to keep from threading say a non standard length . Moving the slab 6 inch is easier than cutting and threading 6 inches off a 2 inch pipe.

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For the standard gas kiln a permanent set up is reasonable, but I just use a flexible 50' hose for my Raku kiln and for getting a little gas going to start the big wood kiln.  I ran a long propane line underground to get heat to the studio (about 40-50') but added a fitting on the outside of the building.  I bought a 50' hose from the propane company that I can just attach when needed.  This type of setup might work for propane users needing only occasional gas for smaller uses (like Raku).

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Patrick

heres my meters-one is a large commercial meter the small one is for the house

I have run 2 inch about 40 feet to get to two gas kilns and another kiln is also on the same 2 inch about 100 fret further

Also my standby generator is tapped into this with 1 inch about 12 feet away around corner.

I did all the plumbing-the gas company has replaced the big meter 3 times in 45 years-each time a smaller unit that handles handles load of BTUs

the last photo is one side of my kiln firing last week-I added 4 extra burners a few years ago to give it a kick when needed, Now its and 8 burner kiln (35 cubic car kiln.

The 2 inch comes straight up next to slab on both sides of kiln-its very clean install. Drops down to 3/4 full port ball vales and then 1/2 inch street ells at burners

 

meter.jpg

burners.jpg

Edited by Mark C.

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You will note I have two sizes of burners-on  pair on each side.

I fire two kilns to cone 11 almost every other week at same time Rae

I can also adjust my pressure if needed with a manometer . Its 1/4# now or 7 inches water column .

My meters are all smart meters meaning they signal the usage with no meter readers.

Edited by Mark C.

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Thanks for the photos Mark. They are worth more than a thousand words, for sure. How's your arm, by the way? Hope it's healing quickly.

Poured my slab (6'x6') this weekend, as we had a little warm spell.  It's under insulation now to cure, as we will have some cold snaps before it is done curing.

I have decided on the type of kiln I will be building, which I will go more into later.  I've got to run, but wanted to keep you abreast of my progress. Next up will be digging a trench from the slab all the way to the meter (hahaha!) and getting pipe installed - maybe next weekend, weather permitting.

OBTW: Got and read Nils Lou's The Art of Firing. Lots of good things in there. Thanks for the recommendation.

Hope you all had/are having a good weekend.

Slab1.jpg

Edited by Patrick

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One last thing when running large 2 inch pipe-make sure to put in an extra tee  away from the meter (near slab)so you can tap into for future service-

You can easily tap into at meter later by disconnecting it and putting a tee in there then. I used mine later to add the 1 inch to my generator.You can add this tee in place of a 90 elbow and then just plug the hole not used.

 

Edited by Mark C.

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Floor's in.

Going to be a catenary arch. 45"w x 60"h x 36"d (inside measurements).  I appreciate everyone's comments on the advisability or lack thereof of this kiln type and of my construction materials. ... But I just gotta build one!  It's what a kiln is supposed to look like!  I wouldn't be happy if I didn't.  It's the same reason I once bought a 28 year old Peterbilt instead of a 5 year old Freightliner.  It was what a truck was supposed to look like! Granted, I got older and sold that piece of crap ... but still!  I'm sure some of you understand. :lol:

OBTW - Gas company put in 1 1/4" service line.  So much for 2". That will still be enough btu's though. Well, I'm off to run gas to my shop and hook up my gas stove before freezing weather sets in.  Y'all have a good rest of your weekend.

 

 

KilnFloor.jpg

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Hey guys and gals.

QUESTION: How high (2"?  4"? etc.) should I lift/shim the arch form before I start stacking?  How far down can I expect the arch to settle? I don't want to "release" the form and it still not be "released".  I could get it out, for sure, but I don't wanna have to make a mess.

Had a somewhat expected but dreaded hiatus. My mother passed away at the beginning of this month, so I haven't been worrying about ... well, much of anything. ... But life is starting to go on again, and I think time spent doing what you enjoy is time well spent.  Plus, my mother would've lovingly suggested I get off my butt and get back to my work. 

I dry-fit all my gas lines yesterday, so I'll be sealing those up today I reckon.  The high temps for us the next week (the last week in December!) is all around 50 degrees - which is crazy warm, so I'll take advantage and start stacking brick for the arch.  The form is just 1/2 inch ply with ripped-down 2x's  for braces and aluminum trim flashing draped over and screwed over it.

Hope everyone has a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year - or a great how-ever-you-celebrate-this-time-of-year.

 

ArchForm.jpg

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put a (or several) layer of kraft paper over the form;  the brown paper used by painters and others can be found in 50 feet rolls at the big-box stores.   I use two layers on my work,  one to stick to the form and another layer to stick to the "stuff" being formed.   makes separation easier.   

 

LT

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The paper release is good idea.

I would do 4 inches as its easier to get it out.

I have a question on your arch? did you use a chain or something else to get the shape?

Good to see you back at it.Sorry about your loss

 

Edited by Mark C.

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Think about how you will grab hold and pull (or push) the form out of the cave you will have created.  How heavy is the form; will it slide easily over the bricks supporting the form; will you need something underneath the form to make moving or guiding the form easier; how top-heavy and awkward to hold is the form; how many helpers are needed to remove the form; what other "uh-oh" and "gotcha" situations you will encounter?   Remember that burning the form 'in place' as part of the first firing is one way to remove the form. 
 

LT

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4 hours ago, Magnolia Mud Research said:

Think about how you will grab hold and pull (or push) the form out of the cave you will have created.  How heavy is the form; will it slide easily over the bricks supporting the form; will you need something underneath the form to make moving or guiding the form easier; how top-heavy and awkward to hold is the form; how many helpers are needed to remove the form; what other "uh-oh" and "gotcha" situations you will encounter?   Remember that burning the form 'in place' as part of the first firing is one way to remove the form. 
 

LT

Jig saw some grab holes in it and position the wood so it will slide and fall away to whatever end you pull out.

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Did you envision what your shelf stack will look like? Take advantage of that blank end board and draw in shelves, allowing for 2-3" space at the sides. How wide are the bottom and top shelf/shelves? Will they be standard sizes? I recommend staggering your shelves so they overlap about 2" apart (allowing some nooks for smalls) as the kiln narrows toward the top. 

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I wonder if your kiln wouldn't load and fire more efficiently if it were re-sized a bit. Check what the interior would be if you re-hung the chain for an arch that is the same width but 5' tall. I think you lose too much space with such a high pointy arch and may impede airflow. 

Edited by Rae Reich

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