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laurelneth

hot wax resist

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laurelneth    0

I am going to do some hot wax resist to decorate some pots. I have heard to use candle wax with approx. 10% lamp oil added. What is the best way to heat the wax and keep it hot? What temp. should the wax be heated to? I would like to pigment the wax black, but even other colors would work. What should I try as pigment? How much pigment to how much wax? What works for you?

 

Thank you for your responses

 

Sincerely, Laurel Neth

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Idaho Potter    62

The first thing to think about is safety. Hot wax and lamp oil? Candle wax won't combust as fast as paraffin, but adding lamp oil--which is made to burn bright--sounds dangerous to me. If you are adding color so you can see where you've applied the wax, why make it black? It will all burn off when the pot is fired.

 

Getting the wax hot and keeping it hot is not so easy. If it's too hot, the wax could boil which means the bubbles formed by boiling could literally explode all over. I've seen microcrystalline wax do just that. I admit I've only used paraffin wax for pot bottoms and used a flat pie tin on a single burner hot plate. I watched it carefully and when the wax was liquid, shut off the burner and when the wax started to set up, turned it on again.

 

Whatever wax or method you use, please be careful and don't leave it unattended. I would hate to hear your studio/house burnt down.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I use paraffin cut with mineral oil , not lamp oil. I use a low setting on an old electric frying pan. I keep the level low so the wax is the right depth for most pots.

Not sure you what you intend to do but hot wax is not easy to use with a brush. Sounds like you are thinking of brushing it on. Hot wax will eat most brushed I know of.

Marcia

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Mark C.    1,807

I use paraffin cut with mineral oil , not lamp oil. I use a low setting on an old electric frying pan. I keep the level low so the wax is the right depth for most pots.

Not sure you what you intend to do but hot wax is not easy to use with a brush. Sounds like you are thinking of brushing it on. Hot wax will eat most brushed I know of.

Marcia

 

 

I use the same setup as Marcia-I just use straight paraffin -just enough to get the pot bottoms covered-We keep the whole affair outside on a sheet of non combustible metal.The heat setting is low.

Mark

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Mossyrock    29

I haven't used candle wax as a resist on pots, but I do melt down used candles to dip pine cones in to use as fire starters for my wood burning stove. I use an old double boiler to melt the candles. I don't have to worry about the wax getting hot enough to burn as long as there is water in the lower pan. I can't imagine being able to brush this liquid though as it solidifies almost as soon as it hits the air. I do some majolica decorating and I use a commercial wax resist that I tint with food coloring so I can see where I've waxed.

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laurelneth    0

Thank you for all your replies. I should have given more detail on what I want to try. I have seen some of Michael Klines wax resist brush work videos and want to try it on my pots. I have already experimented using commercial water based wax resist and adding black mason stain to color it. But that type of resist is not very effective so I need to learn about using hot wax. Any more suggestions?

 

Thanks again, Laurel Neth

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Jeri    0

I use an electric skillet with a 'warm' temperature setting with straight paraffin. It's just enough heat to melt the wax.

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laurelneth    0

what is the benefits of warm wax over the cold already "liquidity" wax? huh.gif

 

 

 

In my nominal experience, it doesnt resist as well. The glaze will stick to it and then you have to dab it off carefully but the wax resist also softens (it's water soluable) so it becomes rather messy and the resisted area is marred. Perhaps I am using an inferior resist for my purpose? If any body does this type of resist using the "cold" wax with good results, please tell me what brand works for you.

 

Thanks for the reply, Laurel

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laurelneth    0

I use an electric skillet with a 'warm' temperature setting with straight paraffin. It's just enough heat to melt the wax.

 

 

 

So you don't add a liquidfier to help with the brush application of the hot wax? Laurel

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laurelneth    0

I use paraffin cut with mineral oil , not lamp oil. I use a low setting on an old electric frying pan. I keep the level low so the wax is the right depth for most pots.

Not sure you what you intend to do but hot wax is not easy to use with a brush. Sounds like you are thinking of brushing it on. Hot wax will eat most brushed I know of.

Marcia

 

 

Thank you.

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laurelneth    0

Thank you everyone who has shared information . It is very helpful. Has anyone any experience with adding stains or oxides to color the resisted area? As I have posted before, I have used mason stain black. It does work, though I was just guessing about amount when I added it to my cold liquid wax resist. I painted a design on a bare bisqued pot, then glazed the pot. If the wax had done a good job of resisting the result would have been good. I'm still interested in hearing more ideas about hot wax with added coloring.

 

Thanks again, Laurel

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Lucille Oka    16

Have you researched Batik making tools? These are some very interesting tools to use with heated wax. The original Batiking tool is called a Tjanting tool. Its origin is from Java, famous for batik fabrics. If you use this tool you will need a small alcohol lamp to periodically heat up the tip of the tools to keep the wax flowing. Some of the more modern ones have the heater attached. It is best to take a look and see if any of these will suit you needs. Go to http://www.dickblick.com and search Batik. You will find waxes, tools, etc. For the lamp, input in Blick's search field 'alcohol lamp'. These lamps are use by sculptors working in wax.

Hope this works for you.

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laurelneth    0

Have you researched Batik making tools? These are some very interesting tools to use with heated wax. The original Batiking tool is called a Tjanting tool. Its origin is from Java, famous for batik fabrics. If you use this tool you will need a small alcohol lamp to periodically heat up the tip of the tools to keep the wax flowing. Some of the more modern ones have the heater attached. It is best to take a look and see if any of these will suit you needs. Go to http://www.dickblick.com and search Batik. You will find waxes, tools, etc. For the lamp, input in Blick's search field 'alcohol lamp'. These lamps are use by sculptors working in wax.

Hope this works for you.

 

 

Wow, thanks for the information. I would never have thought of it myself. I will explore this avenue. Sounds very promising from your discription! - Laurel

 

BTW, I just went to your profile and saw your fantastic pot!!!

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JBaymore    1,432

I've been using hot parrafin wax for decoration for almost 40 years. Common Japanese technique... which is whjere I picked it up. There is no comparison between this form of wax and using the liquid oil based or water based emulsions. The paraffin actually WORKS to resist the glaze coating. Glaze just "peels" off the wax surface in sheets as the surface tension of the wet glaze comes into play. Like beading water on a freshly waxed car hood.

 

I use a old cooking electric fry pan set to a temperature that holds the wax well below the level that ANY smoking happens, but still pretty darn hot. For decorating work you want it HOT. The goal is that the wax penetrates the underlying bisque or the first layer of applied glaze powder. Brushing time is kinda' minimal. You are re-dipping the brush a lot. It takes a lot of practice to get good fluid brushwork. (Watch HAMADA Shoji for a good demo of this.)

 

I use GOOD brushes in the wax. Just like for most any other uses, the choice of the quality of the brush matters. Some of the brushes I use are ones I have made myself with horse hair. Yes.... it eventually kills the brushes. "Cost of doing business."

 

Two health and safety matters are important:

 

Watch that pan like a hawk!!!!! Many a studio fire started with hot wax pans. Have an appropriate type fire extingusiher available and at the ready. If in doubt... use it fast.

 

The fumes are VERY BAD to breathe. I use a local pickup hood that looks like a fume hood in a chem lab. Be careful.

 

best,

 

.........................john

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laurelneth    0

I've been using hot parrafin wax for decoration for almost 40 years. Common Japanese technique... which is whjere I picked it up. There is no comparison between this form of wax and using the liquid oil based or water based emulsions. The paraffin actually WORKS to resist the glaze coating. Glaze just "peels" off the wax surface in sheets as the surface tension of the wet glaze comes into play. Like beading water on a freshly waxed car hood.

 

I use a old cooking electric fry pan set to a temperature that holds the wax well below the level that ANY smoking happens, but still pretty darn hot. For decorating work you want it HOT. The goal is that the wax penetrates the underlying bisque or the first layer of applied glaze powder. Brushing time is kinda' minimal. You are re-dipping the brush a lot. It takes a lot of practice to get good fluid brushwork. (Watch HAMADA Shoji for a good demo of this.)

 

I use GOOD brushes in the wax. Just like for most any other uses, the choice of the quality of the brush matters. Some of the brushes I use are ones I have made myself with horse hair. Yes.... it eventually kills the brushes. "Cost of doing business."

 

Two health and safety matters are important:

 

Watch that pan like a hawk!!!!! Many a studio fire started with hot wax pans. Have an appropriate type fire extingusiher available and at the ready. If in doubt... use it fast.

 

The fumes are VERY BAD to breathe. I use a local pickup hood that looks like a fume hood in a chem lab. Be careful.

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

 

Thank you John for this valuable knowledge. I appreciate everyones thoughtful and informative replies. This is a very generous group and I am proud to be a member with you!

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Lucille Oka    16

Wow, thanks for the information. I would never have thought of it myself. I will explore this avenue. Sounds very promising from your discription! - Laurel

 

BTW, I just went to your profile and saw your fantastic pot!!!

 

 

 

 

Laurel, I did not make the vessel that I use here. It is one of the earliest European Porcelains made in the De Medici Factory in Florence Italy 16th Century, I just love it.

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laurelneth    0

Wow, thanks for the information. I would never have thought of it myself. I will explore this avenue. Sounds very promising from your discription! - Laurel

 

BTW, I just went to your profile and saw your fantastic pot!!!

 

 

 

 

Laurel, I did not make the vessel that I use here. It is one of the earliest European Porcelains made in the De Medici Factory in Florence Italy 16th Century, I just love it.

 

 

Lucille, maybe you could email me and give me a list of some historical pottery books. I would love to know more of what has gone before in the world of pottery. laurelneth@yahoo.com

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laurelneth    0

I've been using hot parrafin wax for decoration for almost 40 years. Common Japanese technique... which is whjere I picked it up. There is no comparison between this form of wax and using the liquid oil based or water based emulsions. The paraffin actually WORKS to resist the glaze coating. Glaze just "peels" off the wax surface in sheets as the surface tension of the wet glaze comes into play. Like beading water on a freshly waxed car hood.

 

I use a old cooking electric fry pan set to a temperature that holds the wax well below the level that ANY smoking happens, but still pretty darn hot. For decorating work you want it HOT. The goal is that the wax penetrates the underlying bisque or the first layer of applied glaze powder. Brushing time is kinda' minimal. You are re-dipping the brush a lot. It takes a lot of practice to get good fluid brushwork. (Watch HAMADA Shoji for a good demo of this.)

 

I use GOOD brushes in the wax. Just like for most any other uses, the choice of the quality of the brush matters. Some of the brushes I use are ones I have made myself with horse hair. Yes.... it eventually kills the brushes. "Cost of doing business."

 

Two health and safety matters are important:

 

Watch that pan like a hawk!!!!! Many a studio fire started with hot wax pans. Have an appropriate type fire extingusiher available and at the ready. If in doubt... use it fast.

 

The fumes are VERY BAD to breathe. I use a local pickup hood that looks like a fume hood in a chem lab. Be careful.

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

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laurelneth    0

I've been using hot parrafin wax for decoration for almost 40 years. Common Japanese technique... which is whjere I picked it up. There is no comparison between this form of wax and using the liquid oil based or water based emulsions. The paraffin actually WORKS to resist the glaze coating. Glaze just "peels" off the wax surface in sheets as the surface tension of the wet glaze comes into play. Like beading water on a freshly waxed car hood.

 

I use a old cooking electric fry pan set to a temperature that holds the wax well below the level that ANY smoking happens, but still pretty darn hot. For decorating work you want it HOT. The goal is that the wax penetrates the underlying bisque or the first layer of applied glaze powder. Brushing time is kinda' minimal. You are re-dipping the brush a lot. It takes a lot of practice to get good fluid brushwork. (Watch HAMADA Shoji for a good demo of this.)

 

I use GOOD brushes in the wax. Just like for most any other uses, the choice of the quality of the brush matters. Some of the brushes I use are ones I have made myself with horse hair. Yes.... it eventually kills the brushes. "Cost of doing business."

 

Two health and safety matters are important:

 

Watch that pan like a hawk!!!!! Many a studio fire started with hot wax pans. Have an appropriate type fire extingusiher available and at the ready. If in doubt... use it fast.

 

The fumes are VERY BAD to breathe. I use a local pickup hood that looks like a fume hood in a chem lab. Be careful.

 

best,

 

.........................john

 

 

One more question, please. I looked for Hamada videos on Youtube and only found throwing videos, no decorating. Could you send me a link if you have one? Thanks again. Except for the question about using stain or oxides as a colorant in the hot wax, my questions have been answered. Yours, Laurel

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JBaymore    1,432

One more question, please. I looked for Hamada videos on Youtube and only found throwing videos, no decorating. Could you send me a link if you have one?

 

NO idea of things on on Youtube.

 

You'll likely have to purchase one of the videos that you can get via Steven Branfman's Potters Shop bookstore. One good one is "Art of the Potter" ......... a great production. I show it all the time in classes. The Susan Peterson one available on Hamada that is titled just like her book on him is more of a "home movie" approach and the narration is awful. But it is interesting.

 

best,

 

.................john

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neilestrick    1,381

Thank you for all your replies. I should have given more detail on what I want to try. I have seen some of Michael Klines wax resist brush work videos and want to try it on my pots. I have already experimented using commercial water based wax resist and adding black mason stain to color it. But that type of resist is not very effective so I need to learn about using hot wax. Any more suggestions?

 

Thanks again, Laurel Neth

 

 

I use regular old water based wax resist. It takes a little practice, but works fine once you get the hang of it. Just make sure the wax is totally dry, and use cold water. Also, keep rinsing your sponge a lot, so the clay on the sponge doesn't abrade the wax. Example (16" self rimming sink):

post-6933-133038468531_thumb.jpg

post-6933-133038468531_thumb.jpg

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