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Where I live, I found a local clay ,pink color that I use for casserole and tajine that fire from 04 to 6

i always fire 04for casserole and they also go to direct flames,glazed or unglazed

its better to fire 04

i am not an expert but it work for me depending of what clay you use.

hope this will help you

 

 

 

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I don’t think one is better than the other, pluses and minuses to both. The earthenware ones will be better insulators, think insulating firebrick vs hard brick, and the stoneware is likely to be more chip resistant than the earthenware. What I think is more important is the design of the piece, glaze fit and having a clay with as low a COE as possible.

Avoiding sharp corners and large flat bottoms in the design and having a well fitting glaze are all factors. The COE / CTE is what I think is the most important aspect. Since the pot will heat up in the oven there is the risk of it doing so unevenly. Part of the pot closest to the element / gas is going to get more heat / stress that the part furthest away from it. The less the pot expands the less chance of uneven heating (stress) and therefore cracking.

Usual caveats about covering the entire base of the pot with food, don’t place a hot pot on a cold surface and put the pot in the centre of the oven and heat from cold oven to temp with the oven.

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Wide flat bottoms will exacerbate the thermal shock issue. You need to have an even clay wall and floor thickness but avoid sharp changes in angles between the floor and the wall. A rounded shape is inherently stronger than a flat bottom form. Also, you want to avoid glaze build up in "corners" where wall and base meet, thicker glaze in that area will also contribute to cracking. Pots with flat bottoms and straight sides can exacerbate this. Many potters have tried making pizza stones for baking breads and pizza on in their ovens. They invariably crack because of uneven heating, the outer edges heat and cool faster than the centre.  Extreme example of a large flat surface being used in the oven but a good example. (kiln shelves make great pizza stones btw)

That being said I have a lasagna shaped pot with a flat bottom that I made a long time ago,  it's survived many years of use. When you are selling work many customers just assume they can treat their pots like pyrex and don't take the necessary precautions, even with care instructions, so it's important to make the ware as strong and resistant to thermal shock as possible.

 

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3 hours ago, Min said:

. When you are selling work many customers just assume they can treat their pots like pyrex and don't take the necessary precautions, even with care instructions, so it's important to make the ware as strong and resistant to thermal shock as possible.

 

Also assume, they will do everything opposite of what is recommended, and still complain that it broke!

In regards to Pyrex, there was a discussion here, years ago, that even Pyrex isn't Pyrex anymore.  The new stuff, isn't as "tough" as the original, and can't deal with thermal shock, nearly as well. 

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Why I buy my pyrex, corning and revere ware at the thrift store. 

This is helpful info, I thought I was doing pretty good when my big crab and seaweed baking dish survived the freezer to 400 f oven test. Perhaps I should change to a more rounded bottom in future attempts. 

 

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