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Hi folks,

A potter friend of mine has an old L&L Kiln. She is "technically challenged" so I offered to put a flyer together for her. I know she paid 6k for it in 1989 but she used it a lot back then. It is in working condition and the elements have about a half life left in them.  Since it's all about the market and who happens to be looking at the time we've discussed a multi-pronged approach and posting it at two local art centers that teach pottery (one is a Potter's Association) as well as listing it on Craig's List,  Facebook Potter's Attic, PottersWeb.net, and maybe the classifieds here (which I just discovered). Anyhow, we're having trouble settling on a value for it, so I'm hoping you all may have some suggestions.  Thank you in advance. (BTW: It's located in Connecticut)

Here's the description:

L&L Large Electric Top-loader

  • Cone 10 rating 
  • 5 rings, 5 thermocouples.  - may be operated with fewer rings. 
  • Interior Dimensions: 29” dia x 45”h with 2.5” brick 
  • Good working condition.  
  • Jupiter Econo model: J2945
  •  LT-3 Kiln Sitter 
  • Amps:100
  • Watts: 20,800 
  • Kw20.8 
  • Voltage ac/1ph208.  (Does not require 3-phase commercial circuit. May be operated using a residential panel with a correctly size breaker) 
  • 13 half shelves 3/4 inch thick
  •  Lots of kiln furniture 
  • Working pyrometer
  • Extra sitter cones

I suggested she might want to add the top ring and get pics of the interior as well as all of the kiln furniture.

TIAkiln2.jpg.1512463029b2bea4aa1c43d777e96faa.jpgkiln1.jpg.7c252f1384408205615651ec3cc52998.jpg

 

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LnL made unique kilns.

Something like that around here would maybe sell for 6-700$, maybe. The value would be in the furniture imo.

It sure is odd looking. I'm used to seeing old olympic/skutt kilns. Apparently I've never seen an old LnL.

 

Edited by C.Banks

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It is unique, but not odd. It is just a standard 3-section 29" manual kiln with 2 extra powered rings stacked on top, with the usual box for the control switches expanded for all 5 sections. Because the controls and sections are designed with plug-in pigtails for the power, one can add/remove sections as desired. The analog pyrometer has a rotary selector switch so you can click through the 5 thermocouples to maintain accurate zone control with the infinite switches. Some thoughts about the electric specs - 100 amps to a single circuit is a lot, would require a direct wired connection, no such plug exists. 208v is typically a commercial service, even as single phase; residential service is usually 240v single phase.

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1. How have you determined that the elements have half a life left?

2. Houses are 240 volt, single phase, not 208 volt. To get it to work properly on household voltage, the elements will need to be changed. For all 5 rings that'll be 10 elements at $56 each, so a  big investment right away.

3. Most people can't reach into the bottom of a 36" deep kiln, let alone a 45" deep kiln. This kiln is really made to be taken apart and re-stacked for loading tall sculptural pieces, which requires two people to do. Most people would only use 3 rings, so you'd be best to price it as such.

4. If it still has all the original wiring, it's probably due to be changed out.

5. Price will also depend on the condition of the  bricks. Can you post pictures of the interior?

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6k in 89, really? I paid $2500 for a 9cf oval in 2007 with an electronic controller. I'd check that so she doesn't have an unrealistic idea of value if her purchase price was in fact a lot less than that.

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4 hours ago, Stephen said:

6k in 89, really? I paid $2500 for a 9cf oval in 2007 with an electronic controller. I'd check that so she doesn't have an unrealistic idea of value if her purchase price was in fact a lot less than that.

Those list at $7245 now, so I suppose it's possible she paid 6K back but I would expect it to be closer to 5K based on  the fact that prices go up about 3% every 2-3 years. With shelving I could see it reaching closer to 6K though. Regardless, it's a very specialized kiln that may be difficult to sell, especially since it's really old and needs elements.

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aah, I see what I missed. Well I guess folks that want/need this stack able kiln for 5-6k new would be likely interested in a used one for a fraction of the price.

Good luck with it, Did your friend buy a new one?

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My friend is downsizing. She stopped making large pieces and huge quantities a while ago and realizes she's not going back to it. She only works on small ornaments and makes jewelry now. She is planning to rent out her detached studio space to another artist (or someone else who can use it) so she's selling off items that are taking up space.

Finally got some new pics from her today. She cleaned it it up a bit. She realizes she's got a limited market and is not like to get a lot for it so we're posting it all over the place including with a well-known equipment repair shop/studio,  group  studio buildings, arts centers, etc.  

Thanks for all the advice.

 

lyd6.jpg

lyd5.jpg

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lyd7.jpg

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nice cleanup! Ya know having been faced with needing something very specific that is priced high I would be patient. when the right person comes along they will recognize the value since the alternative is paying $5500 for a new one and if you make super tall stuff then there are limited alternatives. 

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The bricks appear to be in good condition, so that helps. If the floor has large cracks, that would hurt the value. For someone who needs a big kiln, it would be worth the money to pick this one up and put on an external digital controller. If I were to buy it, I would replace all the elements, redo the whole control box and get rid of all the switches and just hardwire it all through an external controller with zones. The value of the kiln is in the bricks, not the electrical system.

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