Jump to content
jrgpots

recent autism pottery activity

Recommended Posts

It has been quite some time since I have posted in the forum.  I'm not sure how many active  people who are posting I still may now.  Nevertheless, I just wanted to tell of an experience I had last week.  Before I do this I need to explain why in the last 8 months I have not been on the forum.   The good news, it has nothing to do with the criminal justice system.....  The fact is that 1 1/2 years ago I founded a nonprofit adventure camp for those affected with autism.  I have not extruded, formed, thrown anything in the last 8 months until last week.  I hosted a pottery activity for those with Autism.   We had 20 people with Autism and about 10 volunteers at our event.  We introduced the kids to throwing.   We had them extrude coils and form them in a plate project.  They were also given clay to "sculpt" to their hearts' delight.   everyone had fun.  We had no meltdowns or injuries.   The projects will be glazed this week.

It was so great to watch these kids explore their talents.  On another note,  when an autistic kid says he want to throw something on the wheel, you have to be very careful.  He was literally throwing things on the spinning wheel and watching them fly across the room.  He had great fun and squealed very loudly as one projectile hit another nearby participant.   Many more activities are planned...

Jed   

teaching moment.jpg

logo17.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was growing up I had the chance to attend a really special pilot school focused on arts, I was exposed to a lot of things that normal schools and normal kids aren't and I found that really helpful.  I'm now an adult and very high functioning and I really credit a lot of my success in life to that school and my exposure and encouragement to working with my hands.   Throwing clay is therapeutic and eases the soul, anxieties become trivial and the environment I'm in has less urgency.  Thanks for helping these guys and introducing them to something they can focus their energy on.  It may become a life long passion or unlock pathways for their future development.  You are a great person!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

Welcome back Jed!

.... It looks like you've been doing something very rewarding indeed. 

I hope we can continue to grow until we can do this on a weekly basis in our own facility.  We have a long way to go....

Edited by jrgpots
spelling error

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't it be nice if it expanded nation wide.   My son showed signs of being autistic when he was a baby,  I did my research and tried everything that was suggested.   When he was in high school he was diagnosed with severe ADA.  He was a very calm and quiet child,  most doctors thought he had to be hyperactive to be ADA.  I started him rolling out clay snakes when he was two and then we progressed to dinosaurs.  He is married now and still has ADA but has a very understanding wife.     Denice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a heartening story. 

When I taught middle school, we were located a short walk from an arts center that hosted our kids with special needs once per week for arts activities.  With adequate supervision, our kids even worked in glass, specifically making beads.

An hour ago 'I returned from the hospital where I sat bedside with my most beloved young, very ill person, flipping through a craft magazine to inspire ourselves for when she has completed the current intensive run of treatment. It won't be clay for her, but it will be something to look forward to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/24/2018 at 6:55 AM, Denice said:

Wouldn't it be nice if it expanded nation wide. ...

It would incredible if this could go nationwide or even worldwide.  But, I am struggling to get funding just to run the program.  At this point I would settle for a home base.  I'm hoping that the seeds I plant now will grow in the future even if I don't see the fruits of my labor.  

Jed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Jed, for seeing this need and addressing it. I teach K12 art, and more than ever there is a need for kids to work with their hands, pursue open-ended problems, and find positive ways to relieve mental and emotion stress. New experiences are challenging for kids with autism. Thank you for showing them it is worth the risk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.