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Kristy

Air purifiers for silica dust?

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I did a search here with no success.

I contacted a business in my city that deals with industrial purifiers but they are unsure of what kind works with silica dust. Does anyone here know which models do? And if my studio is a room over from where my furnace is, would it be effective enough if I hooked it up through my furnace? I would love for my whole house to have clean air.

Anyone have one? Or know of which model?

Thanks!

Kristy

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1 hour ago, Kristy said:

I did a search here with no success.

I contacted a business in my city that deals with industrial purifiers but they are unsure of what kind works with silica dust. Does anyone here know which models do? And if my studio is a room over from where my furnace is, would it be effective enough if I hooked it up through my furnace? I would love for my whole house to have clean air.

Anyone have one? Or know of which model?

Thanks!

Kristy

Anything HEPA rated.

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Hi Kristy,

Try searching this forum for "HEPA" (high efficiency particulate air).

From there, something like "HEPA for ceramic studio" in Google - note the related search strings Google then offers, e.g "Pottery Studio Dust Control" ( etc. etc.), where the fourth hit lists topics from CeramicArtsDaily.org B) - see "Basement Studio - Dust Control" ...see also "Dust collection in studio" topic, particularly Mark's posts.

 

My two cents, if the air intake for central heat was pulling from my studio, It'd have to fitted for HEPA, then I'd be curious to see how fast it plugs up. If central heat system was pushing to my studio, then clay dust would be pushed out to the rest of the house - that seems worser*! The ~$50 (two pack) 3M MPR 2800 furnace filter "...capture of 0.3 to 1.0 micron particles." Hmm... we run something like that in the house, on account of family members allergic to dust (actually, dust mite detritus, another topic...).

My studio is in the smaller of two garages. The drill (thanks mostly to reading here) so far includes clothes and shoes that stay in the studio - if there's clay on the clothes, in the water bucket they go, and the shoes get wiped off with wet sponge; getting up clay off the floor before it dries; mopping up splashes, the wheel, bats, etc. before clay dries; vacuuming** with the p100 mask on, then thoroughly ventilating the entire area (open th' garage door); wet mopping the floor; checking the rate of dust deposition (my bike's shiny frame, for instance ...shelving, countertops, etc.) and wiping down with a Hulk sized sponge; clean rags - which I use to dry hands, bats, etc., not so much to wipe clay - any rags besmirched with clay get thrown in water, for dried clay on cloth becomes airborne dust; no sanding, scraping, etc. clay inside - all that happens out of doors, back to the wind.

The rate of dust accumulation on surfaces - e.g. aforementioned gleaming bike frame, ahem - tells a tale!

*me can say that, degree in English me have!

**shop vac fitted with "fine dust" bag and secondary filter - it's not a HEPA by any means, however, the amount getting by the bag seems minimal. Mostly I'm vacuuming to get up the mess the parrot makes, not clay bits; the clay is on the other side of the shop.

 

 

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You dow not want your whole house heater to get silica dust in it

Heres what I did in my studio

(I converted also a woodworking  airborne dust  air handler(Jet and delta makes them) for my studio. It handles the air you breath.  It is in the rafters.It has a cloth bag inside it and a few air filters on the front-the inner one is a heap filter. I run this when making dust (glaze mixing) or feel there is dust around . It turns the small studio air very quickly. The trick is to find a heap filter that fits the existing units -they are all  about 12"x24"I found the hepa filters online and tape them to the standard filter-Run a regular filter in front of the Hepa filter and change that more often.)

If you have a room in your house you need to really keep any dust just in there and not spread it. There are two thoughts on dust -one is use a heap vacuum the other is collect the airborne dust with a heapa air handler-this does not pick up ground dust but airborne dust. I use both systems but I also do this for a living. Hepa filters clog fast so they are poor choices for whole house heater systems.

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With silica dust, prevention is better than cure. You’re better off working clean and mopping regularly, particularly if you have a studio in your basement.  It’s not the dust you see that is the stuff that causes health issues: it’s the smallest particles. In terms of filters, HEPA 99 or 100 is what they recommend for glaze mixing. Monona Rossol refers to anything else as a false sense of security. 

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