Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
John cook

Clay contamination

Recommended Posts

Generally, the only color that I am concerned with is bright white, as that usually means some pieces of plaster found their way into the scraps.

If it is any other color, black, brown, yellow, a less brilliant, and far more fuzzy white, then it's all good.

Like Denice said, a lot of people like the "aged" clay.  It's like a fine wine/ whiskey or an *allegedly* good cheese. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatta ya mean "allegedly" good cheese!! Nothin' better than a good 'ole stinky cheese! "In traditional French cheese-making the cheese-maker leaves a local loaf of sourdough bread, teeming with starter cultures, in underground caves rich with penicillium roqueforti. He lets the bread get moldy then grinds up the moldy loaf and mixes the breadcrumbs with the milk curd. The cheeses are then aged in the caves where the bread went moldy; this encourages the development of blue veins." Yum! So, as with a great Roquefort, moldy clay is just awesome (well, maybe not the Cool Ice or Frost procelains! 

On 9/20/2018 at 9:44 AM, Benzine said:

or an *allegedly* good cheese. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to find black areas in our slop buckets, always stank, dark black. after a few years finally realized what it was. . . . kids were throwing paper towels into the slop after cleaning up their areas. They took very little time to really rot out in the clay usually 4-6 months. Cheap paper!

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2018 at 5:03 PM, Pres said:

I used to find black areas in our slop buckets, always stank, dark black. after a few years finally realized what it was. . . . kids were throwing paper towels into the slop after cleaning up their areas. They took very little time to really rot out in the clay usually 4-6 months. Cheap paper!

 

best,

Pres

Yep, I've run in to that too Pres. 

Unintentional paper clay, with some added aging. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.