Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I found this picture on the Amaco website and can't figure how to get this look. It doesn't necessarily like drips. Perhaps the glaze is poured along the lip while the bowl is turning on a wheel? I don't think it would work to turn the bowl upside down and dip... that would create an air bubble. It looks like the white glaze is poured in first with the other colors following along the edge...? I see that the rim must be waxed to show the clay, but it's the inside design I'm trying to recreate.

Any words of advice would help, thanks!!

IMG_0286.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was the photo in the "Layering" section of the site? If so, it will usually give an indication of the glazes used and the number of coats of a particular glaze. This one looks like it might have  3 base layers of Amber Brown with a wax resist to keep the sharp line, the a couple of coats of a white starting about 1 1/2" from the brown down to the bottom, then 2 or 3 coats of Vert Lustre top to the middle, then probably 2 coats of Deep Firebrick in a random band near the top. 

I have done some extensive work with the Amaco Potters Choice glazes over the past year with some pretty good results...

You just have to experiment and keep very accurate records of glazes used, # of coats, patterns, and photos before and after if you want to come close to reproducing the effects.

2090690894_GlazeFX1.jpg.848f740638715d3f4064a419e6dca592.jpg

This one is my favorite and looked the best after a second firing to repair a defect in the bottom of the bowl, but another blister formed which I tried to repair (the white spot), but was unsuccessful...

1249716103_1Fave.jpg.d05a13050c70f1ac0bf45d346aa4c9cd.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for your responses. JohnnyK your pots are beautiful! I understand your description, but not the technique. Are you dipping the pots so the interior is saturated with glaze? Or pouring the glaze in and out, or brushing? I make my glazes, so haven't tried the beautiful Amaco colors. My glazes do layer nicely, I'm just bored with my final outcome.  I love the center color and the other colors flowing towards the center. I only dip/pour my glazes.

Thanks again! 

IMG_5065.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a similar effect once by putting a bowl on the wheel, held in-place by some coils, as you would when trimming, letting it turn at a low to medium speed, and pouring some glaze into the center.   Like the 'spin-art' done by pouring paint onto a spinning sheet of paper.  (Here's a small version on Amazon: http://a.co/d/6oZ09OB )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Marge said:

Thanks so much for your responses. JohnnyK your pots are beautiful! I understand your description, but not the technique. Are you dipping the pots so the interior is saturated with glaze? Or pouring the glaze in and out, or brushing? I make my glazes, so haven't tried the beautiful Amaco colors. My glazes do layer nicely, I'm just bored with my final outcome.  I love the center color and the other colors flowing towards the center. I only dip/pour my glazes.

Thanks again! 

IMG_5065.JPG

All of my work is brushed. Since mine is not a production studio and I'm still experimenting with the layering techniques, I buy my glazes by the pint. I have a few favorite techniques and with that in mind, I've bought those glazes in gallons.

It's easier to visualize the description of how the original pattern was developed if you think in terms of brushing because it is doubtful that you could even come close by dipping/pouring. My guess is that some long random strokes of the Vert luster and the deep firebrick  is what caused the pattern in the white.

JK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Mr. K is spot-on with the assessment of which  glazes were likely used. I've had similar results with brushing and gently tilting/rotating the piece so the flow is downward and inward. Then it all moves more during firing and looks like the top pic and Johnny's bottom pic. Electric cone 5, using  commercial glazes-sorry, don't have any pics at the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/11/2018 at 4:48 AM, Marge said:

I found this picture on the Amaco website and can't figure how to get this look. It doesn't necessarily like drips. Perhaps the glaze is poured along the lip while the bowl is turning on a wheel? I don't think it would work to turn the bowl upside down and dip... that would create an air bubble. It looks like the white glaze is poured in first with the other colors following along the edge...? I see that the rim must be waxed to show the clay, but it's the inside design I'm trying to recreate.

Any words of advice would help, thanks!!

IMG_0286.jpg

I think the "white" is rutile. This pot, imho, looked nothing like this when it went into the kiln. 

A rutile blue glaze, which is a bit runny by itself, is banded inside the rim with rutile and with iron. I like to put a pinch of rutile and tin in the iron to give it some variety. It will all run together merrily in the firing. My experience is with a K9 Rutile Blue glaze fired to ^10. This looks just like it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.