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KellyRainey

Work Table

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

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I use folding tables in my studio -- both 4' and 6' lengths. I have several pieces of 24"x24" plywood that I use as the non-sticking work surface and then sponge them down when I'm done. I also use sheets of newsprint under clay slabs to work on.

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

The problem with a good work table is stability a lot of the times. If you can attach the table to a wall, then a piece of 3/4" plywood would probably do with a couple of 2X4 front legs. If you need it to come down, consider a couple of old door hinges on the wall to support it and then the legs. Otherwise I would go with the folding table even though it won't be really steady-especially for wedging.

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My husband made me a table. Structure is made of steel 4x4 cm, and 4 mm thickness, height is bit higher then standard because I am 180 cm tall so I need it to be 100 cm tall. On top of structure he placed wooden board 4 cm thick. It is screwed to a structure from below so no screws or anything is on top surface. Also I have one shelve maybe 15 cm from floor, and here I keep my clay, slip buckets etc.

 

And to protect the wood I aplied layer of oil and left it to soak for 2 days. Now it has nice surface, it absorbs extra watter but is protected from deformations. I will try to make a photo later and post it. I also have samall studio, so this was perfect solution for me.

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I love my work tables, and they are super easy and cheap to build. Use 4x4's for the legs, 2x4's for the rails, all screwed together, with 2x4 corner braces. Super stable. I can jump on them. The tops are 3/4 MDF (cheap!) with about 8 coats of linseed oil. The oil keeps the MDF from falling apart when it gets wet. It's a nice smooth, durable surface that's still porous enough that clay doesn't stick to it much. I've got two of these tables in my studio that get used daily (up to 50 students a week), and after 8 years they still look great. Every couple of years I give them a fresh coat of oil.

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I use two old and heavy folding tables in my itty bitty home studio. They are both against a wall so give me the stability needed. For wedging clay I took two 3x3 foot pieces of plywood and covered them with canvas; they work quite well for me most of the time. I am considering having some cement board attached to the table tops as the boars slip sometimes. My son also helped me build a reclaim table that can be stored under one of the tables, it also has a shelf under it where I store my clay and other supplies. Hope this helps a little.

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Thank you everyone for your replies and ideas. If anyone has photos of their tables that they would not mind posting so that I can get a visual of what it should look like that would be great.

 

 

Thank you again

 

 

 

Kelly

 

 

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

 

Ikea! I have a Bekvam kitchen trolley which is just brilliant - solid wood, cheap with two shelves underneath and wheels on two of the legs. It's about 20"x24" and a good working height. I have to admit I usually use other surfaces (usually my slab roller) for working on, but tend to work on damp closeweave cotton anyway.

 

19722_PE072900_S2.jpg..... ooooh! I didn't expect that to work - this is its picture

 

Christine

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Thank you everyone for your replies and ideas. If anyone has photos of their tables that they would not mind posting so that I can get a visual of what it should look like that would be great.

 

 

Thank you again

 

 

 

Kelly

 

 

 

 

Late post: If you had the extra cash, Harbor freight has a workbench (meant for woodworkers) that is made of nice wood, has four drawers underneath the top and a shelf below. If you get it, be sure to glue the connections instead of just screw them. I find it a very nice unit. I put plastic wood in the holes on the top meant for the woodworker's items, then sanded them down.

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

Hi Kelly,

I was thinking that if you need a table that you can not only work on, but also do your wedging on, you would probably do well to use legs a little heavier than 2x4s. I used 8x8s scraps that were under my friends deck (they were used for the legs of the deck several years prior). I put on a nice thick plywood top. It is a small table, but it doesn't budge! 6x6's would do too. The folding table is a great accessory for working and toting to craft shows, but you will not be able to wedge on it.

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Guest The Unknown Craftsman

You might try garage or yard sales in your area, where you might find an old, well built table for very litte.

I say that because we have a yard sale dining table in our studio, and it has stood up to six years of clay "abuse." It's probably at least 40 years old, because it is very well made.

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If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

Just a thought...

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If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

Just a thought...

 

What a nice idea! I will do this

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If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

Just a thought...

 

What a nice idea! I will do this

 

thanks very much

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If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

Just a thought...

 

 

That is a good idea. This would surely come in handy no matter what table I end up building, buying, etc. Did you try to find a smooth plywood or did it matter since you were covered with canvas?

 

Thank you for the suggestion..

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

 

Ikea! I have a Bekvam kitchen trolley which is just brilliant - solid wood, cheap with two shelves underneath and wheels on two of the legs. It's about 20"x24" and a good working height. I have to admit I usually use other surfaces (usually my slab roller) for working on, but tend to work on damp closeweave cotton anyway.

 

19722_PE072900_S2.jpg..... ooooh! I didn't expect that to work - this is its picture

 

Christine

 

 

Ohhhhh That would be a good size... I will have to see if I can order online here in the states. I love Ikea but I do not have one in my area so I can only purchase what they carry online or in the catalog...

 

 

Thank you for your suggestion and the picture... Pictures always help...

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Thank you everyone for your replies and ideas. If anyone has photos of their tables that they would not mind posting so that I can get a visual of what it should look like that would be great.

 

 

Thank you again

 

 

 

Kelly

 

 

 

 

Late post: If you had the extra cash, Harbor freight has a workbench (meant for woodworkers) that is made of nice wood, has four drawers underneath the top and a shelf below. If you get it, be sure to glue the connections instead of just screw them. I find it a very nice unit. I put plastic wood in the holes on the top meant for the woodworker's items, then sanded them down.

 

 

Ironically, I have seen that one a million times and I keep telling my husband that if I had the cash, I would buy it in a heartbeat... But the cash flow always seems to be very short when they actually have it in stock. I live right down the street from a Harbor Freight and I think everyone and their brother buys up the worktables every time they get them back in stock.. :-)

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If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

Just a thought...

 

 

That is a good idea. This would surely come in handy no matter what table I end up building, buying, etc. Did you try to find a smooth plywood or did it matter since you were covered with canvas?

 

Thank you for the suggestion..

 

 

The sheet was smooth on one side. They've been in use now for 2 years and show no sign of wear.

Peter

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If space is at a premium or you'd like your table for multiple uses, I cut 4 pieces of 3/4 plywood ( 2- 24x48 for white clay and 2- 18x36" for red clay) and screwed 2 together then covered them with canvas. A small piece of rubberized shelf liner laid on the table will prevent the

wedging/handbuilding boards from sliding around. The afterwards, just put the boards against the wall out of the way.....

Just a thought...

 

 

 

I hadn't thought of using the rubberized shelf liner to hold my canvas covered boards in place. I use it in my home studio all the time, (even have it on shelves as intended), I'll have to give it a try today, I have some reclaim that needs some good wedging! Thanks for the suggestion!

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

 

Ikea! I have a Bekvam kitchen trolley which is just brilliant - solid wood, cheap with two shelves underneath and wheels on two of the legs. It's about 20"x24" and a good working height. I have to admit I usually use other surfaces (usually my slab roller) for working on, but tend to work on damp closeweave cotton anyway.

 

19722_PE072900_S2.jpg..... ooooh! I didn't expect that to work - this is its picture

 

Christine

 

 

Ohhhhh That would be a good size... I will have to see if I can order online here in the states. I love Ikea but I do not have one in my area so I can only purchase what they carry online or in the catalog...

 

 

Thank you for your suggestion and the picture... Pictures always help...

 

 

I was just in Home Depot last week and noticed that they have a knock down table for sale that is workbench type for around $70. This table can be put up in about 5 minutes so it should work very well as a work surface with a piece of plywood over top. It is sturdily built, and would not have much give.

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

Google (images) "pallet table" for lots of ideas on how to turn FREE pallets into whatever you need.

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

Google (images) "pallet table" for lots of ideas on how to turn FREE pallets into whatever you need.

 

 

Just a thought for you. If using Plywood try to get pine Plywood rather than Fir. Fir has a tendency to check and become uneven to a greater degree than Pine. Voids in a wood surface can be filled with the automobile body compound "Bondo" Which is nasty and chemical but lasts a long time while serving better than plastic wood fillers

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Last Fall, hubby and I stopped at an outdoor flea market on the way home from a visit to Eureka

Springs. Just for a look.

 

I found a great table for clay, a solid chunk of wood that wouldn't wobble. Twelve dollars and a

complete new order of the contents in my little CRV, it fit! Once we put it in the house, I began to

look a little closer at the table, and even took it outdoors, stripping off sections of what appeared to

be recent brown paint. Underneath that paint lived a gorgeous farm table! We are now in the process

of stripping the table, where it will live in the house!

 

Tomorrow, I'll hit the yard sales in search of another, though I am somewhat saddened by the 'loss' of

the farm table to the living room.

 

:)

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what if you could mount the top on a few hinges to the wall and two hinged legs? You could put it up when you need to do something else. Hinged to the wall would make it steady and solid with two heavy duty legs.You could still put your canvas covered board on top of it.

Marcia

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I am looking for a small work table for a very small studio (I mean very small studio). I do not mind building one but I have no idea where to start. I will using it just for working. I already have a cement board covered in canvas that I can put on the table when I need to wedge but I need something other than it to work on that my clay won't stick to like crazy.. Anyone have instructions, ideas, photos, etc? I would greatly appreciate any help..

 

Thank you!!!

 

Kelly

 

 

 

Ikea! I have a Bekvam kitchen trolley which is just brilliant - solid wood, cheap with two shelves underneath and wheels on two of the legs. It's about 20"x24" and a good working height. I have to admit I usually use other surfaces (usually my slab roller) for working on, but tend to work on damp closeweave cotton anyway.

 

 

Dear Kelly,

 

I noticed your post. I was using large canvas covered boards on a table in my studio for a while.

 

Then a friend gave me an old piece of slate. It works extremely well. I got a guy on Kijiji to simply make me a table out of old skids and it seems to be working well. While I still use the canvas from time to time and am now experimenting with some dry wall for my slabs, the slate table is good for dry wedging. If your clay is wet, it is not as good. But for clay right out of the bag (or I guess pug mill if you have one) it is a serious surface for wedging.

 

I am now contemplating what I will do with my old wet clay and how to dry it??

 

I am thinking I will use one of my large plaster bats and put my wet clay in a pillow case on top of this surface for drying. In a pinch, I have also used newspaper and the t-towel or pillow case method in a simple bowl (i.e., one lined with paper). The only issue with this last method is that you really have to watch how quickly your clay dries.

 

Another issue with a new table has to do with height. Recently, Simon Leach spoke about the height of a wedging table on one of his videos. He spoke about needing to be able to be on-top of the clay when wedging to prevent injuries. Thus, when designing your table remember height and ensure that you have a table that is comfortable to lean into the clay and not strain your back.

 

My thoughts for today.

 

Nelly

 

19722_PE072900_S2.jpg..... ooooh! I didn't expect that to work - this is its picture

 

Christine

 

 

Ohhhhh That would be a good size... I will have to see if I can order online here in the states. I love Ikea but I do not have one in my area so I can only purchase what they carry online or in the catalog...

 

 

Thank you for your suggestion and the picture... Pictures always help...

 

 

I was just in Home Depot last week and noticed that they have a knock down table for sale that is workbench type for around $70. This table can be put up in about 5 minutes so it should work very well as a work surface with a piece of plywood over top. It is sturdily built, and would not have much give.

 

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