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*I’ve edited the original post*

Hi Everyone!

i am getting my first pottery wheel this week, I tried throwing and I felt such a connection that I’ve been obsessed with learning tutorials on YouTube. Classes, although would be beneficial, are not going to happen right away (hold you fire, I know I should take them right away). I’m a creative soul- an artist and gigging musician. I just feel it in my being that pottery is my next endeavour. I’m planning on buying the Shimpo VL Lite, a box of clay and some tools to get me started. I know my craft will not appear immediately, but any advice or tools/accessories this newbie should buy would be appreciated. 

Thanks and Namaste 

Edited by From & To The Earth
Original post wasn’t accurate

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Every wheel thrower needs to teach themselves their own techniques to a large extent.

However, you will save yourself a lot of time and lower your learning curve if you have someone teach you some basics. Such as, how to position and brace your body, arms, and hands. How to center. Basic knowledge of different claybodies. Basic tool knowledge.

Beyond that you can personalize your approach as much as you want.

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Beginner's classes are relatively inexpensive and the knowledge you gain in a short period of time can be priceless. Where do expect to obtain the knowledge you need to be successful? Do you have unlimited funds to spend on the equipment you will need to be successful in your endeavor?

Just asking?

JohnnyK

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Will you at least look at youtube or something? Read up on safety issues surrounding, say, clay or glaze dust that you are unlikely just to guess? You have only one set of lungs. 

Why the aversion to learning anything from others?

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20 minutes ago, JohnnyK said:

Beginner's classes are relatively inexpensive and the knowledge you gain in a short period of time can be priceless. Where do expect to obtain the knowledge you need to be successful? Do you have unlimited funds to spend on the equipment you will need to be successful in your endeavor?

Just asking?

JohnnyK

Thanks for your wisdom.

i do have a good friend that has been a potter for 30 years. He has shown me some basics and is willing to help. 

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Great you have a friend to help. Great potters don’t always make good teachers. One of my proff only knows how to teach advanced throwing which is very different from beginning throwing.  But then you are limited to one point of view. Attend as many workshops you can. 

For me another great teacher are beginning students. I assist at my JC and helping students has been extremely beneficial. 

I am sorry to say but your words make you sound like a very closed person. Kinda I know person. Perhaps you are not that pompous. 

The thing is pottery out of all the simple art forms is very complicated. Science and art reside side by side. 

You have to REALLY know your materials, know your tools. There is a lot to learn. Which is why community is so important. You won’t find too many potters working strictly on their own. 

Dont worry. You will find your own voice. 

Be aware of safety issues - not only materials but also physically. In pottery your hands are just a tool. They are not what you throw with. You really throw with your body. 

If you plan to spend hours at the wheel for the rest of your life get risers so you throw standing up and not bent over.  

What is the largest you plan to throw in future? 50 lbs? 10 lbs? 5 lbs? Make sure your wheel can handle that. 

To be honest with you I’ve tried many types of wheels and really you can’t go wrong with any. My favourite is a fly wheel made from scratch 50 years ago. There is a feel to that I never get on an electric wheel. Too darn heavy to move unfortunately. 

If you are not new to clay but just to the wheel then just disregard my post!

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Having a potter friend help will be invaluable. He has shown you the basics, you write. What will be wonderful as well is for him to watch you as you throw to tell you what your body is doing that you might not be aware it is doing. 

In terms of safety, do some research to protect your health. Dust and fumes are not your friends. Unlike, say, the things you use in oil painting, there aren't big smells to tell you are inhaling things that are bad for you.

Edited by Gabby

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Hey welcome to the board!

This is a great place to come for advice and everyone is very friendly and helpful. Hey only you know if and when you want to take classes. Me, I think buying a wheel and getting your friend that has 30 years of pottery to get you started with the basics is a great place to start. Put on some tunes and enjoy.

I assume you are going to add a kiln to the mix, be sure and check out the archives when making your decisions. I have ordered a couple of kilns from clayking and they have them drop shipped. I would recommend looking at a 4+ CF kiln so it will hold a decent number of pots when you fire.  

I hope you have a blast!

Edited by Stephen

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32 minutes ago, Stephen said:

Hey welcome to the board!

This is a great place to come for advice and everyone is very friendly and helpful. Hey only you know if and when you want to take classes. Me, I think buying a wheel and getting your friend that has 30 years of pottery to get you started with the basics is a great place to start. Put on some tunes and enjoy.

I assume you are going to add a kiln to the mix, be sure and check out the archives when making your decisions. I have ordered a couple of kilns from clayking and they have them drop shipped. I would recommend looking at a 4+ CF kiln so it will hold a decent number of pots when you fire.  

I hope you have a blast!

Thanks for the feedback. I’ll likely use my friends kiln. But isn’t a kiln only needed for kitchenware?

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