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chipcoates

Creating texture with airbrush or gun

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Can anyone advise on how to create a rough surface texture with an airbrush or spray gun. I have tried a large nozzle and low pressure but it hardly creates any texture after 10 coats, letting each one dry in between. Any ideas. Ron Nagle creates textures like this this using an airbrush according the statements I have read.

Any advice appreciated.

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Apply a thick slip to your piece with a brush or your hand and start using the the airbrush/spray gun or just an airgun to move the thick slip around until you find a texture you like. I feel just spraying layer after layer you will not build up a heavy texture because the way the spray gun distributes the slip evenly.  Applying too much slip to an already wet piece may cause the pot to slump or collapse. Good luck.

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3 hours ago, chipcoates said:

Ron Nagle creates textures like this this using an airbrush according the statements I have read.

Are you sure about the texture being created with an airbrush? Was thinking about spraying ITC coatings and the gun that is used for that, a siphon sandblaster like this. (you can find them at places like Harbour Freight). I can see the underglazes or whatever colour he is using being sprayed on top of the textured surface with an airbrush but not so sure that would be the best way to get the texture. What are you using for the texture slip?

Edited by Min
added link to sandblaster

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I surmise from your comment re Ron Nagle's work that you are trying to produce visual texture as compared to physical tactile texture.  

Think "splatter painting". 

Try spraying with a screen mesh between the spray tip and the work.  Vary the screen mess size and the separation distances between the spray gun, the screen, and the ware surface.  That should give you very wide range of effects.   Also the viscosity, surface tension, and density (aka solids to liquid ratio) of the glaze slurry are variables in the size of the droplets that reach the ware surface. 

LT 

 

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Thanks for that video and article, Preeta! Nagel demonstrated to my JC Ceramics class in the mid-seventies and inspired us all. He was just starting to use alternative finishes. Seeing his punny titles reminded me that he inspired me to name one of my teapots the "Two Cup Treepot" and also to use low-fire bottled glazes (old lady ceramics back then in the age of ^10) on Raku to get those bright reds, yellows and oranges. 

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