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Kachenbeat

Glaze Shivering Problem

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Hello  everyone who is looking.

I have glaze shivering problem on elements made from two parts, that's means inside of it is emphty, all other product is full with slip and they are not ephty and they  dont have shivering, what could couse this problem ? moustly this problem on black glaze on the edges and ridges.

Mb some one know expert who can come in or contact with me derectly and we can discuss all story if you know someone who can help pliz let me know.

I know it is very small information about glaze and clay.

 

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Hi, guys sorry for the delay.

We are located in Ireland.

Our clay is white and our cone is 07 -  950°

Glaze we buying at scarva.com based in the UK,  we are buying 1060° glaze but our kiln temperature is 950° and I think that's why we have glaze shivering but I'm looking for answers

Another point is that we cant use lower cone glaze because we are making Ceramic Heaters and if glaze will be lower cone then glaze will melt or remelt on an element while it will work.

Is it there any asnwer on that?

Thank you

 

Edited by Kachenbeat

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We can't go hotter because of its damages our wires inside, that's why we went lower cone and that's why we got the shivering problem, what to?

and we fire elements once before we glaze them, and when we glaze them we send them the second time 

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44 minutes ago, Kachenbeat said:

We can't go hotter because of its damages our wires inside, that's why we went lower cone and that's why we got the shivering problem, what to?

and we fire elements once before we glaze them, and when we glaze them we send them the second time 

 

What wires are being damaged by hotter firings, the elements?

Elements shouldn't be damaged by hotter firings.  The higher the firing, the less life you get out of the elements, but it doesn't damage them per say. 

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9 minutes ago, Benzine said:

 

What wires are being damaged by hotter firings, the elements?

Elements shouldn't be damaged by hotter firings.  The higher the firing, the less life you get out of the elements, but it doesn't damage them per say. 

He's making ceramic heaters with elements embedded

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Now I see. Sorry for the confusion. I think you're going to have to formulate your own glaze that will work at the lower temps, or modify the commercial glaze, which is a bit tricker. If you can estimate the amount of actual glaze material in a volume of glaze, you can increase the melt by adding some low fire frit. Just a couple percent may do the trick. If you want to go the test and retest method, you could just add 5 grams of frit to a pint, mix with a blender, and dip a tile. Add another 5 grams, mix, dip a tile. Add another 5 grams, etc. I would run 8 tiles, then fire them all at cone 07 and see what you get. Put a catch plate under them in case they run a lot. From there you can figure out how much frit you need per pint to make it work.

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I would use Ferro 3110 (or an equivalent high expansion / low temperature frit that is available in Ireland). Shivering could be due to the glaze not fitting the clay in addition to being underfired.

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Hi guys

Thank you very much for your answers, I really appreciate your help and posts.

I have another question here to know.

We are making a commercial glaze from scarva and when we make glaze viscosity is very high, what I do is I put a lot of water to reduce it to 27 viscosity is this is a problem? or I should youse deflocculant to reduce viscosity,  not water?

 

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I've thinned a commercial, brush on glaze, to use for dipping.  I wasn't very scientific about it.  I just added water until it was to a consistency that flowed well for dipping. 

I find that my commercially made glazes, are quite forgiving, and this was no exception.  I did test it first, doing a single, and double dip, on a tile, to see how it effected the final color, thickness and how much it may run. 

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