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Ginny C

Additions to slip for speckles?

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I'd like to get speckles in my slip decorations. I use B-Mix ^5 clay because I love the ease of centering and the smoothness, but unless the glaze I use has speckles in it, the result can be too plain. Is there something I can add to slip (made from my same clay) that will add speckles? So far I mostly make functional pottery, and I fire to cone 5 in an electric kiln. I'm interested in experimenting with colored slips, over which I'd use a clear satin glaze.

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I'd like to get speckles in my slip decorations. I use B-Mix ^5 clay because I love the ease of centering and the smoothness, but unless the glaze I use has speckles in it, the result can be too plain. Is there something I can add to slip (made from my same clay) that will add speckles? So far I mostly make functional pottery, and I fire to cone 5 in an electric kiln. I'm interested in experimenting with colored slips, over which I'd use a clear satin glaze.

 

 

I have not tried to work with speckling in my slips, but often granular manganese is added to clay to give a speckle at ^5-^6. You might try a few tests on some tiles to see what happens. I would probably start at about 3% and work up to 10% in 2% increments to find what works best for you. I'm sure others here have more experience with such a thing, but I think this is the right place to start. Good Luck.

BRL likes this

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You could also try granular ilmenite or granular rutile. Ilmenite and rutile are made of iron and titanium, so they don't have the toxicity concerns of manganese.

 

Granular ilmenite doesn't melt at all at cone 6, it creates tiny black specks. Granular rutile melts a little (though I guess that all depends on the fluxes that are nearby) and makes larger, rust colored freckles with softer edges.

 

Mea

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I agree with Mea and Pres. Granular Illmanite makes a metallic spot. Granular Rutile melts slightly and is a brown colour. Try increments of 3% additions in your slip until you get the concentration you like.

TJR.

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I have not tried it yet myself. But I am going to try putting some powdered colorent ( Mason Stain, copper carb, iron) in a pepper shaker and sprinkle it on to a wet glaze so it will stick. I do not know if that would give you anything like you are wanting or not. I have a friend who make pots that look like metal and he was looking for a corrosion effect so I was going to try that to see how it would look. If it does work let me know and if I get it done first I will post it. Maybe someone else has already. ain't clay fun Kabe

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Hi all

I did some experiments with granular illmenite last year and thought you may want to see an image.

This was a very simple addition of 1 teaspoon of illmenite in 1 cup of Cesco brush on clear gloss glaze (fired to 1260c) in oxidation. Some stunning steely blues and a range of brown tones have emerged- the photo prob doesnt do it justice.

I didn't ever do any inclusions into slips but think I will now.

cheers Lyn

post-6239-13275696612_thumb.jpg

post-6239-13275696612_thumb.jpg

CybeleCeramic likes this

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Hi all

last year I did some experiments with granular illmenite. This image is a simple mix of 1 x teaspoon illmenite into 1 x cup commercial Cesco brush on clear gloss glaze, fired to 1260c in oxidation. Some stunning steel blue speckles with a full range of brown tones.

I didnt play with slips but hope to now. The photo prob doesnt do it full justice

cheers Lyn

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