Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Min

slab mat

Recommended Posts

I was going to order a couple slab mats and am looking for some reviews about how durable they are and any positive or negative feedback from people who use them. Any thoughts?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been using them for over a decade or two. I call them and bought their seconds at a deep discount . Then trimmed them to fit my machine which is 30 inches wide. They have seconds with torn edges or ends on the larger sizes and you just trim them down.Call them direct about seconds.

I have yet to wear one out.I hang them on stainless rods (think towel rods) so they keep well without creasing.

I'm a believer -the only downside is they are made from a paper like substance and they do get wet but having a few dry ones to rotate will cure this issue as they dry real fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've "only" had mine for four years, but they are as tight, clean, flat, and functional as when they arrived.  I clean them immediately after use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I use slabmat to cover a work table?

would it withstand a junior college beating? I am trying to replace our canvas with a ‘non dust grabber’ material. 

I had to go look up slabmat as I had no idea what it was.  

Not sure if I want to hijack this thread, but do you think it might work? Or is it too fragile to handle rough use from students esp since this is more of a hand building focused school.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mark C. said:

I think its poor choice for table cover-better choice is tyvlk hose wrap or like product-sponges easy-formica is maybe  the best choice-cleans easy comes in large sheets-glue it down

Does your clay stick to Formica or do you use a thing on top of it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To cover a long utility table for a work surface, I often use a thin non-fabric tablecloth from the dollar store (works better than pricier, thicker ones), stretched tight and Gorilla taped all around to the underside of the table.  (If cutting tools will be used though, this is not the solution...more for wedging, glazing, handbuilding etc.) It is surprisingly durable, easy to clean,  and cheap to replace. I also cover it with kraft paper for glazing, or will put a large printers blanket over it for certain functions, like when using bladed instruments.

Actually, now that I think about it---Hardiebacker board would proably be ideal for the purpose. It is tough, releases clay, is great for wedging/drying etc. 

Edited by LeeU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Mark C. said:

clay will stick to formica but its a washable tough surface for a table.put whatever you want on top of it.Canvas tabletops are dust collectors.

Right looking for a surface to recover bench and on which I can work clay directly. Formica won' do it..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite bench top material is raw  wood.  When working with slabs I cover the wood, or at school where the tables are steel, with 1/8th inch thick craft foam.  If the clay sticks to the wood or the foam, the clay is too wet to work.  The table top is wiped clean with a sponge at the end of the day.   I keep a stack of foam available.    At school I have wood slabs for each project I undertake.   The slab size is chosen depending on the scale of the project.   The wood slabs and the foam sheets are washed and dried as needed to keep dust under control.    

LT  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use my slab roller table as my surface which is a large steel table with mdf as the surface-On that I use slab matts. For small work I put the slabs on paper covered wood squares-the paper wicks the moisture out. I used to before my electric slab roller use plaster slabs to roll work out.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.