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I have been told that wood and soda fired pieces can be refired at a lower temp. (cone 6) to smooth out rough surfaces on the wood fired pieces and to reglaze unsatisfactory soda fired pieces.  Does anyone have experience with this?  If so can the same wadding be used on the soda fired pots and the wood fired pots?  I do understand that the wadding has to be placed in the same place as in the original firing.

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You can and just re-glue old wadding, but it will not sit the same way and be a little wobbly. I tried but the effort is not worth the time for me and I think it's safer to just use fresh wadding so the piece is totally stable.

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how are you refiring them? Electric or soda again? if electric you wont need wadding anymore. 

reglaze? reglaze on bare clay that the salt/soda did  not hit? then its not a problem. but if your ^10 glaze underfired  then i am not sure how ^6 would react on them. 

  the rough issues  (if you didnt glaze your pot) are the places that didnt get salt or soda. i usually clear glaze them and put them in ^6 gas with no wadding.  i lose some but they still come out pretty. 

i do not know the salt and soda kilns well enough to know where the salt and soda reaches.  instead i've learnt to  just glaze the inside of bowls.  usually clear or a transparent glaze since i use slip and leave some bare clay.  

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They will be fired in a gas kiln at cone 6.  One piece will have a cobalt wash applied over a celadon that didn't get any soda in the first firing.  The wood fired piece is quite crusty and I hadn't thought of reglazing, just running it through a cone 6 firing.  I'll try using a clear on that though and see what happens.  Thanks for your comments.

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Lin no wadding needed in gas kiln unless its a gas soda or gas salt kiln. 

did the celadon turn out ok? was it underfired? was it a cone 10+ firing?  or you didnt like the colour?  if it wasnt glossy or satiny you better put a glaze over it because i dont expect it to change.  

even if the glazing came out right (but  not nice colour) not sure how just a cobalt wash would look at ^6 gas.  the glaze would not melt. but would it get soft enough to take in the cobalt wash? i have  no idea. 

woodfired pot -  not sure what your definition of crust is. is it all over the pot or just a 'button' of crud in one area? when i think of crust - i think firebox, i think unmelted ash and therefore quite a lot of crud. i personally like that for my vases and  sculptural pieces.  not my cups (depending on how well i know the wood kiln and loaders - i go tall and narrow instead of flat and wide).  in other words i make different wares for woodfire where crud does not matter or i try to live with it in the design. so for some woodfires i dont make bowls and instead make covered jars.  that amount of crud i dont know how much would be changed by clear/translucent glaze.  i refired as an experiment  and did not like how much of the wood salt dramatic affect i lost.  next time id rather have used the rough bowl as a key bowl rather than  refire it  and lose the look that i lost.  well next time now that i know the kiln a little will be putting in a liner glaze inside. 

if u expect the crust to melt in ^6 - not gonna happen. not hot enough. 

with a lot of crud i dont know what you would do. clear or glaze will not take care of it.  if it is a button of crud just try to knock it down and then sand it and then glaze and refire. 

Edited by preeta

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2 hours ago, preeta said:

if electric you wont need wadding anymore

 

The soda from the soda firing will have formed a sodium silicate glaze, albeit possibly a very thin one, on the underside of the pots in the areas without wadding. I would apply wads to the same areas that had wads in the initial firing to prevent any sodium silicate glaze fusing the pots to the shelves. You are in the range to remelt the sodium at cone 6.

Edited by Min

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Thanks Min.  That's what I thought.

Preeta, the piece is a bird and when I say crusty I mean really crusty!  Some of it I was able to knock off.  I'll try sanding.  That sounds like a good idea.  The celadon is just exceptionally blah and I'd like to try to make it a bit more interesting.  The Cobalt wash I use goes at least from Cone 6 to 12.

Thanks for your ideas.  L

 

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