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0625_jay

What should i mix in tio2 for cost reduction?

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20% tin is a lot in a recipe to start with. Half that should give a good solid white.

Tin definitely gives a softer white than zircopax, and titanium used by itself goes yellow. I'd suggest starting by doing a small line blend with decreasing amounts of tin to see how much you actually need to opacify your glaze. This by itself could reduce the cost of your glaze.

If you're not happy with the results of that test, try blending opacifiers to find the sweet spot where you still have the softness that tin brings, but aren't breaking the bank trying to get a nice white glaze. I've had good luck with tin/zircopax combinations for a stark white, or tin/titanium combinations for a white glaze that does interesting things when layered with other glazes. 

 

Edit: 

argh. Sorry. I read that as tin, not titanium. 

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What effect are you using the titanium dioxide for? Opacification, variegation, crystals?

Welcome to the forum!

edit: just to clarify your question, you are looking to replace up to 20% of the titanium dioxide content in your recipe?

Edited by Min
clarity

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It’s interesting that the chemical formula for tin oxide is SnO2, while the formula for titanium oxide is TiO2, yet most of the responses addressed the original question as being about reducing the amount of tin oxide. Are we certain that this was what was meant?

Regards,

Fred

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I think the question is unanswerable unless the required result and what it'sbeing added to ....chicken soup???..Is clarified.

With Neil on cost. Xx

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Upper part and lower part both are different in whiteness. Titanium is 80% in upper one. It's whiteness is better with compare to lower part. But it's price is as same as pure tio2. So if anyone can suggest mineral that 20% added, we can reduce cost. I think supplier  added minerals for increasing their profits.

PicsArt_06-17-03.14.03.jpg

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Are these glazes?

80%  titanium dioxide  TiO2  seems overkill for slip or glaze

Tin oxide SnO2  around 10% is about norm for a glaze and as written above can be sub stituted by other opacifyers unless you're looking for other attributes that TiO2 brings to the glaze.

Zirconium will introduce a whiteness also..

Still not sure where you're going with this. Folk use white slips on red clay and use clay bodies possibly deflocculated .

A lot has been written in these forums about this 

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A Whitewash Story:   Once upon a time when working with a very dark clay body I needed to write on the pieces with black ceramic ink.   To increase the contrast between the inked text and the background a white ink was concocted from a mixture of pure titanium oxide, a very small amount of EPK, and a pinch of soda ash, all mixed into a water slurry to a consistency between whole milk and buttermilk.   The white ink was used on both green ware and bisque ware.  When fired to cone 10 (reduction) the matte 'white rectangle'  with black ink text was crisp, fully adhered to the surface as though it were a matte glaze.   At another time (years later) a quickie white ink was made with pure titanium oxide, water, and liquid hand soap to write on the bottoms of extra dark clay bisque ware.   The ink was fused to the ware and the text was a matte white; fired cone 10 reduction.  
  
I still occasionally use from the small jar of white ink.   The recipe, as I remember, was two-three teaspoons of pure Titanium oxide, less than 1/4th teaspoon each of EPK and soda ash, and water.  My reasoning was to use the EPK as a suspending agent and the soda ash and or soap was to lower the surface tensions and improve the wetting of the solid particles when mixed with water.   These ingredients were chosen because they were readily available in the storage room at the time the ink was needed to finish time critical projects, i.e., the white ink was an improvisation under time constraints.   Pure Titanium oxide is very white,  reasonably refractory,  and readily available (there was a big jar sitting on the bench). 

LT
 

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If this is paint, add calcium carbonate (whiting) and use a UV whitener additive to take off the yellow edge.

Glaze—zirconia products? for a whitener, they’re pretty cheap. But as Neil says, glaze is cheap.

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