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potter.y

Black and white ink spot/oil spot copycat?

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Hi guys!

I was wondering if anyone might have leads on mixing a glaze similar to these:

larger.jpg.f05a810e8753abfa71a19ef8766c345e.jpgmaycojunglegemsglazeinkspots.jpg.b5e76ed612ba79843d2b234a44f2a823.jpg
The first glaze being a Albert Montserrat oil spot glaze, and the second being Mayco's "ink spot" glaze (which is classified with their jungle gems/crystals collection). I am more interested in the second glaze as it looks a bit more achievable. (Are oil spot glazes and crystal glazes even in the same realm?!)

I'm fairly new to mixing my own glazes and am pretty stumped by this one, but am obsessed with the "composition notebook" pattern.

Thanks for any help!

E

Edited by potter.y

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Plenty of oil-spot recipes on Glazy.

Montserrat uses a porcelain body, and fires high - 1300 deg C. I believe part of the trick in firing oil-spot is the firing schedule - a slow firing is favoured, apparently, in oxidation. And the glaze is generally overloaded with iron. There, my knowledge runs out.

Mr Britt wrote Oil Spot Glazes, which might help a little, too.

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It is the cover glaze over the iron saturate glaze that must be put on extremely thick. "...apply to an almost unbelievable thickness of 1/8 - 1/4 inch (3-6mm)." John Britt from his ^6 glaze book.

I spray the iron glaze then pour the cover glaze. The cover glaze is mixed to a specific gravity of 1.65 - 1.70, very thick.

You must be brave to apply this much glaze. It works. Some of the globules that are created and dangling will come off if handled roughly. I had one on the bottom of a handle. I touched it and it broke off. It was hollow inside. 

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2 hours ago, Marcia Selsor said:

you should get on the chat group of Exploring Midrange glazes with John Britt. They just did these types of glazes.

Marcia

Oh! Are you referring to a special chat group online related to the book or the book itself (interestingly, I just received this book in the mail from Amazon. Serendipitous). 

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@potter.y Commercial glazes with the crystals in them are basically just glazes with little pieces of fired glaze in them that melt out a bit. You can brush on the glaze, and then scoop up some of the larger 'crystals' from the jar and place them on the pot where you want them. It would be a difficult thing to make on your own, since it appears the 'crystals' are pre-fired pieces of the same or very similar base glaze, not just glass or colored frit which would run a lot more.

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9 hours ago, neilestrick said:

@potter.y Commercial glazes with the crystals in them are basically just glazes with little pieces of fired glaze in them that melt out a bit.

Thank you Neil for answering the unasked question - that is always there at the back of your mind, but is drowned out by other more pressing issues.  

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17 hours ago, neilestrick said:

@potter.y Commercial glazes with the crystals in them are basically just glazes with little pieces of fired glaze in them that melt out a bit. You can brush on the glaze, and then scoop up some of the larger 'crystals' from the jar and place them on the pot where you want them. It would be a difficult thing to make on your own, since it appears the 'crystals' are pre-fired pieces of the same or very similar base glaze, not just glass or colored frit which would run a lot more.

Thank you! I think this is more what I was looking for, although oil spot glazes are amazing, I'm not quite on that level yet.

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