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Rex Johnson

Older Bailey Slab Roller value?

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Is this a good deal? Older but like new Bailey slab roller.

$1000

Model# M-400-008K and M-400-014-2K long table (7 feet long)

Pretty close to the price of new version 30"  outsid3 of the longer table.

"It is not a DRD/II.  It is the “Original” Dual Roller Drive slab roller. The roller-drive is by #40 chain and sprocket".

Dual Roller Drive, 30" Slab Roller with Long Table
Can produce sheets of clay from 1/16" to 1 3/4" thickness
Includes 30inch wide X 10 foot long canvas
Table is 30" wide by 7 feet long; wheel is 34" diameter

 

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Edited by Rex Johnson

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14 hours ago, oldlady said:

call bailey for exact instructions on how to use it.  CALL THEM, do not email.

Uh, thanks but it's pretty clearly demonstrated by Mr Bailey himself.

My question was if it was a good deal. but then I've got that answer, yes. The whole setup with the table and all is twice the price.

 

Edited by Rex Johnson

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sorry, cannot see whatever jim is doing.

just wanted to make sure you know if it is one that requires feeding the clay from the left and not trying to make it go the other way.    

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Yes, that's Mr. Bailey himself. We have 2 of them in studios I work in. One is way-old, the other brand new last year. And yes, they must be rolled from left to right ONLY! On the older model, the hand wheel turns clockwise, and the slab moves as if the rotation of the hand wheel is pushing it through. There is a ratchet and pawl on the lower roller that prevents you from turning the wheel backwards. Unless you force it and bend the pawl pivot (which students have done several times over the years, then you have to disassemble it and repair the pawl, until it breaks and then you must buy a new one, $32, don't ask how I know the price...). On the new model, the wheel turns counterclockwise, visually contrary to the motion of the slab, but you get used to it - pull back on the wheel to make the slab go forward. There is still a pawl and ratchet on the lower roller, but now you can't turn the roller the wrong way by turning the wheel backwards. Now the handwheel is threaded (left hand thread, to be exact) onto the drive shaft rather than affixed by a set screw on a flat of the shaft. Thus, if you turn the wheel the wrong way, it will simply unscrew itself (and if you turn it enough times hoping it will finally draw the slab backwards, the wheel will fall off and break your toe. Lesson learned yet?)

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Well this one I'm buying was bought new around about 2002. It has the chain and sprockets. Which way the wheel turns I have no idea.

 

The Original DRD Series Manual Slab Rollers
Introduced in 1978, Bailey's Original DRD Series is the finest slab roller built anywhere. The Original DRD slab rollers are commercial duty machines designed for professionals who want maximum load output, exacting accuracy, and trouble-free operation. Clay is rolled in one pass to the desired thickness. No other roller even comes close to this robust versatile design.

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All have the chain and sprockets, the difference is where/how the handwheel and its drive shaft enter the drive train. And yes, you can smash any wad of clay in one pass with this beast, but IMO you shouldn't. Rolling a slab stretches it in the direction of the roll. Clay memory will cause it to later shrink back more in that direction. So, a slab rolled in one smash and then cut to a perfect square/circle will end up as a rectangle/oval. A better technique is multiple rolls in multiple directions. You can't really do it like the manual rolling pin brigade, flipping it and turning it and rolling every which way. Here you have to roll in increments, and turn (and flip) the developing slab as you bring it down in thickness. That also means picking it up from the output table and bringing it back around to the input table, and doing some mental gymnastics along the way so it doesn't get so long during an interim pass that you can't turn it and still fit it within the width of the roller for the next pass. In the video, that was a nice parlor trick Mr. Bailey showed us, rolling a perfect slab the exact length and width of the table in one roll, but the kiln gods are waiting for a smackdown on that with some uneven shrinkage.

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...ahhh Jeez...yer bummin; me up Dick.

I've been using a Bailey 16" mini up til now. Basically I just want to be able to roll out a (wider) slab in one pass, not necessarily for flat work.

Mostly I lay slabs over throwing molds.

Edited by Rex Johnson

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 i do not know why the video does not work.  it began to make a loud buzz and a message came on that windows wanted me to turn of the computer and start again.  do not ask, i do not know the exact wording.

in any case, rex, i have had a bailey since about 1991.  mine is a 24 inch model, originally in the center of an 8 foot long table.  yes, it has a board with a piece of canvas attached to it.  THIS IS NOT THAT SILLY OTHER BRAND SLAB ROLLER THAT USES MULTIPLE THIN BOARDS TO DETERMINE THICKNESS!!!  

the board and canvas simply guide the slab over the rollers without sticking the canvas into the cavity between the roller and the tabletop.   that can happen on a northstar brand.   my bailey  slabroller still produces a perfect slab that is equal all the way across.  the one you are looking at probably will, too.  my suggestion to contact jim bailey was to TRY TO PREVENT your buying something you did not want.   i LIKE to back up the slab once it has passed over the rollers. that is because i like to work at the left side of the tabletop the slabroller is on.  

if i had the kind i THINK that one is, it would BREAK if i tried to back it up.   dick white knows what he is saying.  bailey makes the best slabrollers, i just wanted you to determine which kind that one is.  since you watched the video, i think you now know.

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IMG_9583-XL.jpgI thought it was a discontined (old) model but they still make them. The M-400-008K is considered an industrial model. Definitely made to last.

Though so far I have to say that Bailey equipment to me, design & fab-wise, is pretty base from an engineering viewpoint.

However, the wife and I had a very nice experience going to Santa Barbara and meeting the owners. Gosh I wished I could afford to live there.

Picked up the new-to-me slab roller.

New, the roller itself is was $1499, now on sale for $1199. The 7' table is $488. Plus freight we're looking at an easy $1800 plus, most probably more.

I think 1/2 price at $900 was a decent deal since it's barely used. I've seen rusty old Brents around here for $750 and more.

I'll try and keep me fingers outta the thing... :o

 

Edited by Rex Johnson

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On 5/31/2018 at 3:18 PM, oldlady said:

 ... i LIKE to back up the slab once it has passed over the rollers....

This looks like it rolls both ways. I removed the gear covers to do some lube and maintenance and it's pretty straight forward, gears and sprockets.

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looks like does not mean it does.  that short table on the feed side tells me it will not back up.        only a call to bailey will tell you what you should know.    hope you don't break it.

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Does it click when you roll it? If it clicks, there is a ratchet and pawl somewhere. Is the big hand wheel screwed on its shaft  by left hand thread, i.e., it advances the clay through the roller (left to right) by turning the hand wheel counterclockwise? If so, when you turn the handwheel clockwise, do the rollers turn or does the handwheel simply unscrew from the shaft? BTW, notice the red sign on top with the big arrows point to the right. The label says it should go only that way.

Edited by Dick White

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 Rex I own that same exact machine 30 inch wide with long table-the only differance is mine is electric drive-to handle

Who where the potters in SB ?as I know a few there. My family lived there (not Me)My sister still is in Summerland.

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I have one of these I got in 2002. It works great. one direction feed but I never minded that. I rotate the slab feed each time I roll it through.I paid $1100 in 2002. Some grit is worn on the rollers but other than that it is fine. Moved it to Texas and back to Montana. I use slab matts with it.

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