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Mark C.

Production Glaze Ideas

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Production glaze ideas

 

When you feel the need for speed here’s a few glazetools/ideas that speed up glaze day-these are aimed for production potters Not hobbyists

 

 

 

Electric ½â€drill with jiffy for general mixing

 

I like the jiffy ps-1 for 5-15 gallon batches-I have worn out many of these in my life-the HS-2 is good for smaller batches/buckets and fits a small cordless drill good

 

I like the Hanson mixers for hard settling glazes-it reallygets the bottom of bucket good and mixed-not as good for general mixing

 

 

 

A large electric fry pan turned on low for hot dipping paraffin-this is a tool we keep outside on a steel pan as it is a fire hazard

 

It works best if you are glazing lots of flat bottomware-Like mugs –spoon rests-sponge holders-French butterfishes-candleholders-and the like

 

 

 

This ware can be cleaned up with A Power Sponger for speed–this Tool

 

Is for volume glazing –(I bought one years ago for a slipbusiness I had as a side gig) -it will clean Mold lines off slipware as well as glaze on flat bottom ware. I no longer do any slip work but the power spongeris a great time saver for large runs of flat bottom ware on glaze day

 

It has a slow rotating super large round sponge that fitsonto a 5 gallon bucket And spins in the water >

 

 

 

The other tool we use is the glaze jet-I wrote an article inon how to build one in the volume 36 #2 2008 issue of Studio Potter

 

This tool clamps to any 5-gallon or larger bucket and spraysglaze straight up into a form and Really Speeds up interior glazing

 

They are fairly easy to make-I’ll post a photo of one

 

This tool makes short work off hundreds of interiors to beglazed-like mugs

 

About 1/3 the time compared to pouring them

 

 

 

I must add credit to both above tools, which originally came from Gordon Ward who posts on this board-he had a business called( Tools For Clay) back in the day and both these items came from him-. I later made my ownglaze jets when

 

They became unavailable

 

The power sponge is still on the market-again it’s too expensive for hobbyists and really not needed for small amounts of work

 

 

 

I do lots of dipping, brushing and poring-

 

As to the brushes-my favorites are homemade homegrown bamboohandled deer and skunk hair

 

The pouring is easier with more control for some forms witha norpro funnel batter pitcherThese have a long spout-I keep a few around for manycolors of glazes -you can get them from Amazon as well as see what they looklike.

 

http://www.amazon.co...26827219&sr=1-7

 

 

 

Lets hear your tips??

Heres a few photo of glaze jet and pots to be glaze jetted

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Cortright

 

WWW.liscomhillpottery.com

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Reviving this thread!

 

One of my favorite glazing pieces is the Talisman production sieve. Unbelievable how much faster you can sieve glaze with this compared to other sieves. It can fit onto any bucket 5-gallon or larger.

 

Marc, you mentioned the pouring funnel. I purchased several similar pitchers from the dollar store and gave each one a hook of its own with a label with a glaze color. I save time and glaze with them because you don't have to scrub between uses since you assign it a specific glaze. After I use one, I use a spatula to scrape the glaze back into the bucket and hang it back on its assigned hook.

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+1 on the Talisman. I got spoiled having one at my disposal when in school. The very first thing I bought when I started teaching here was a new Talisman (after sieving bucket after bucket with a regular sieve and a flexible rib). Saves an enormous amount of time, although it's a bit bulky.

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By the time I do all the cleaning of the Talisman parts, It really doesn't save me much time. Plus it's bulky and takes a up a lot of space when not using it, and can get leaky around the screens. I prefer the screens that sit on top of a bucket, and I use a 4" house painting brush to work the glaze through.

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When I used to do lots of pieces I used several little things that added up. Waxed bottoms with the electric skillet, glazed batches of insides first, used wet scungy to clean off excess outside quick. Used a big damp piece of upholstery sponge to clean excess glaze from waxed bottoms then a dry one to finish. Used two glazes, and lots of stains as inglaze technique. One glaze was a semi gloss zinc white, other was a brown that rabbit fur.  Used atomizer to decorate the pieces with stains and finished with brush work. Pots came out of the bisque, and were waxed while still warm, edges checked for sharp, or burrs, sanded, washed the next day and glazed. Out of glaze, priced, and packed in wine boxes or other for storage with number of pieces and $ amount.

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Simon Leach, in one of his most recent videos, put his 5 gallon glaze bucket on the wheel and a regular sieve on top of the bucket. He turned on the wheel medium speed and held a spatula in one hand and a dishes brush in the other to push the glaze through the sieve. It made quick and easy work of a lot of glaze sieving in a short time.

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