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Moving on from glazing bisque to finishing the edges/surfaces of greenware. When I do this I pretend I have no eyesight so I can feel my pieces; if they feel satisfying, they get to live; if I am not enchanted or intrigued when holding them, they gotta go.  (Oh good grief--I have a cultural appropriation (incorrectly called a waving lucky cat -Google "maneki-neko") on my workbench!! And there it will stay.)

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Edited by LeeU

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57 minutes ago, liambesaw said:

Yep, Costco tote with a couple inch o plaster in the bottom.  If I put them in there for a day or two after attaching handles they even out a bit

Thought that was a foam cooler.  That's a great idea for a damp box, since it's strong, yet light.  I just lightly cover my mugs, after attaching handles, basically until the handles firm up.  I used to have issues with the join developing hairline cracks, when used to use magic water *and*  a joining slip.  Since then, I switch to only magic water, and zero cracks. 

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21 minutes ago, Joseph Fireborn said:

I use a small green house for my mug handles. Works perfectly. I also use it for when something comes up and I can't get to my work to trim it.

That's what I mainly use it for.  I'll throw mugs and pitchers and store them in wetbox all week, then attach handles on the weekend all at once. Works great!  I don't have much room so I store these tote dryboxes outdoors, but a greenhouse thing sounds like a great idea for someone with room inside

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No, works for me. Easy Peasy! Also have an engineered recirculating chamber that evens things out in minutes to hours but plastic just fine here. That recirculating thing is really nice but a pain compared to the plastic. Jennifer McCurdy showed me a nice quick way to manage drying with plastic. She would gather it evenly and drop it into the  top  of her vessel then drape it over evenly on all sides and voila! Learn how to manage your drying speed she said to me.

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callie, i use the plastic grocery store bags with the handles cut off.  put a pot into the bottom of the bag, fold the sides over the top and if necessary, cover that bag with one over the top.  just found a double bagged bowl from last fall.  it was perfect to trim.  (student never came back before i left for the winter.)

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You gotta have something worth dry cleaning to use dry cleaning plastic :lol:

I have painters plastic for in the studio, but it's only really helpful if I can get to what's inside of it within a few days.  The wet box just keeps everything the same moisture regardless of time, so saving up a bunch of mugs for handles day works well for me.  Under plastic my mugs are too dry after just 3 days.

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Cleaning and smoothing some moldings for my outdoor project.  It is so humid here  I am just throwing a piece of plastic over what I am working on.  Third week of rain,  we found out the neighbors next door had there basement flooded.   There house sits much lower than ours we are at the top of the hill.  Denice

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10 hours ago, Callie Beller Diesel said:

Am I the only dork left using dry cleaner plastic?

I love dry cleaner plastic! As a potter I hardly ever set foot in a dry cleaners, but my NYC sister hooked me up with a large stash. 

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Controlling the rate of drying has been on my agenda for a few years now. Couple of years back I was mixing a wetting agent into porcelain in an attempt to control it: those who got samples know how badly that flopped.

so I have been working on a spritz made mostly of organic/food safe materials. To date, I have extended drying time by roughly 30%. When I get up to 50% or so, I will unveil it. However, I have no laboratory rats to test toxicity on, so PM me if you want to volunteer to drink a cup or two. ( that was Westerner joke by the way).

T

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I've never actually owned a garment that required dry cleaning.  I just went into the shop and asked if they could give me a handful of bags. 

I've held work for 2 weeks under dry cleaner plastic, and my climate is classified as semi arid. You have to make sure you have plastic under your ware board if you need it to last that long. Eg, lay one piece of plastic on the shelf, place bats or boards with pieces on shelf, curve excess bottom plastic inwards and gently lay bag over top of ware.

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I do not use or have a damp box (never did) I use plastic sheets-some are dry cleaner bags from friends but most are plastic just a little thicker(tougher) from items we have recieved.I keep a tub full of them and use them about every day.I think I was in a dry cleaners in 1963 with my mother? but am unsure .

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I've been using some leftover scraps from "Construction Plastic".  It's what contractors and such put up, to protect against dust getting out of the work area, to catch paint drips, etc.  It's thicker stuff, and keeps the moisture in quite well.

It's been so rainy here lately, that my basement stays pretty damp itself.  If I just poured some plaster on the floor, it would be one big damp box.

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Right now 40 jars sitting in the shop waiting for honey/spoon lids, 26 in the kiln, Mug throwing next week 75 for the order, probably get them thrown on Tues & Thursday. Recycling thawed out clay is rougher this year, but doable. Now use a heavy wiggle wire to cut bread slabs, spray and slam. Used to put finger holes in the slab, this is quicker and easier. Wiggle grooves hold water well.

 

best,

Pres

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Un loaded two kilns  this week and have dispersed most of it. I'm taking a break from clay some (still putting in a few days a week) in next 6-8 weeks.

The last remodel project is starting on the house .Its a big one -but only one room-the main bedroom. About everything one can do to a room-

Edited by Mark C.

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On 5/23/2019 at 9:21 PM, Callie Beller Diesel said:

Am I the only dork left using dry cleaner plastic?

I still love my drycleaner bags, I can't remember the last time I actually drycleaned anything, but it didn't keep me from stopping in one and asking if they had any discards. I'm still using them, and that was 5-7 years ago, with a bag of them still in storage lol. They are light, they drape well, I double, sometimes triple them up to control drying.....and sticking with the subject, my workbench is clear, I'm ready to start again, pitchers are the need for this week

Edited by Johnmicheal
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16 hours ago, Mark C. said:

Un loadfed two kilns  this week and have dispersed most of it. I'm taking a break from clay some (still putting in a few days a week) in next 6-8 weeks.

The last remodel project is starting on the house .Its a big one -but only one room-the main bedroom. About everything one can do to a room-

I read the emailed version of this project. Sounds like it will be as perfect as you can make it! Heated closets!!!

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While spoons are setting up in this warmer weather, I use a small bucket with a lid, sponge in the bottom with a plate on top. They last for weeks in that.

Everything else gets a used garbage bag.

best,

Pres

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