Jump to content
Nili

Newby Question - use of slip for glazing

Recommended Posts

Apologies for the stupid question - I'm very very new to this :)

Can I use slip at the greenware stage instead of glaze for drinking cups/mugs, or will they leak? The reason I'm asking is that I want my mugs to have a very thin matte finish. Maybe there is a better way to achieve that?

Thank you and I'm sorry if the question is too stupid.

Nili

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love a matte finish. There are beautiful matte glazes you can use that fire at Cone 5 or 6. You might look at the Laguna website at theirs. I have several of them.

I also have very matte glazes from Amaco that work better on the outside of mugs and bowls , because they have a course texture, than they do inside.

There are also matte clear glazes you can put over colored slips, if you like your colored slips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What type of clay are you using, lowfire, or mid or high? Also, do you know how vitrified it gets? (absorption figures from the supplier if you haven't run your own test) I'm assuming you are just talking about using slip on the outside of the cups / mugs?

BTW it's not a stupid question at all! Welcome to the forum :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Nili said:

Thank you and I'm sorry if the question is too stupid.

There's no such thing as a stupid question.

There are certainly vitreous slips, that is, slips which will become non-porous when fired.

vitreous slips

Plenty of other info out there. Start with a search of this very forum for 'vitreous slip' - lots to wade through!

Whether you'd want to use them on a surface likely to come into contact with food/drink is another matter. There are questions about hygiene on matte surfaces (although these concerns are over-excitable, in my view), and questions about any potentially dangerous materials in the slip leaching from an imperfectly vitrified layer. There is, to some degree and again in my view, an over-excitability about this too, although it should be taken seriously for a small subset of elements.

A further problem might be getting such a slip on a mug to have anything other than an unpleasant 'mouth-feel'. I'm sure it can be done, but it will take some experimentation.

Edited by Sputty
To edit something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other issue with matt glazes, apart from the tea stains, is the noise the teaspoon makes.  Like fingernails on a chalk board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

chilly has pointed out one of the real drawbacks of matte glazes on interiors.  in addition, cleaning matte interiors, especially with things like coffee and tea, is a real pain.  i have had some matte cups and must use bleach to remove the discoloration.  not a pleasant thing to do.

just fyi, i have a matte glazed commercial dinnerware set made by Mikasa.  you would think they know what they are doing.  not so.  the plates get cutlery marks every time  i use them.  matte glazes are just not worth it.

think about slip.  it is only clay that is extremely wet.  maybe it has color but it is still just clay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

janetjean,  do not think i am criticizing you.    this very complex subject and you are probably used to finding fast answers to any question using a computer.   

 if you go to the search on google and enter "define engobe"  you will see several questions after the definition that engobe is a slip.  slip is wet clay.  engobe has a few other things in it.  it is not a glaze.   still does not answer the original question from  Nili.

there seems to be so much confusion about simple terms these days.  there does not seem to be any new reference material to help new people learn the language that potters have been using for a long time.  there are books written years ago, probably before most of you were born, that have glossaries in the back to help new potters make sense of the complex field of ceramics.  these are thick books, some were used as textbooks.  there is a reason they are so thick, there is a lot to learn.   today people seem to think only new info is correct, anything written in 1970 has to be outdated.

rant over.  i am not a grouchy old person who should go somewhere else, just frustrated by the apparent lack of basic information that could be disseminated easily but is not.

perhaps this forum could have a printed out glossary so computer users could find what book readers saw in their textbooks.   maybe one of the real experts in ceramics could prepare something and submit it to CAD.   if they did, would you use it?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, oldlady said:

perhaps this forum could have a printed out glossary so computer users could find what book readers saw in their textbooks.   maybe one of the real experts in ceramics could prepare something and submit it to CAD.   

Here you go: Glossary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Janetjean said:

Engobes maybe?

The key thing about an engobe is that its chief purpose is to completely cover. For example, a white engobe can be used on an inexpensive red clay, transforming the surface, but retaining the cost benefits of the cheaper clay body it covers. Whether or not the engobe is porous or vitrified is secondary to its primary purpose, and not immediately defining.

Etymologically, the word is French - en-gober, or (effectively) to swallow. The engobe 'swallows' the base clay.

Interestingly, if you enjoy these things, the word gober in turn derives from Gaulish, and from Proto-Celtic gobbos - beak, or muzzle. For those in the UK, it should now be instantly clear where the uncouth slang term 'gob' - meaning mouth, and also a bolus of spittle -  comes from.

The things you can learn from your cat. Oh, wrong thread...

Edited by Sputty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MIN!  THANK YOU! 

perfect!  now, how to get it to the place on the forums that people can see at a glance and search at leisure?  maybe its own heading?  or is that too hard to do?  maybe two titles, glossary and dictionary of pottery terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THANK YOU ALL!

THERE IS NOW A GLOSSARY AT THE TOP OF THE SECTION "STUDIO OPERATIONS AND MAKING WORK"  same as the one mentioned above.  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.