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A question for anyone:  Stoneware clay fired to cone 6 vitrifies, correct?  If so, is it necessary to glaze the interior of an olive oil or other liquid container to keep the oil or liquid from penetrating the object?  I have been clear glazing the interior of my cruets but now wonder if that is really needed.  Answers will all be appreciated!

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2 hours ago, Rick Wise said:

Stoneware clay fired to cone 6 vitrifies, correct?

Some does and some doesn't. Manufacturer might give you absorption figures but for more accuracy you need to do some absorption tests on your clay fired in your conditions. About 3/4 of the way down this article it explains how to go about measuring absorption. For an oil bottle you are going to need the absorption to be as close to zero as possible.

For cleanliness I would continue glazing the insides.

Welcome to the forums :)

 

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Yes, you should glaze the interiors. First, a well fit, non crazing glaze provides a seal in case the clay doesn't fully vitrify. Second, it's more hygienic, especially since you'll likely just be rinsing it out to clean it. The rough unglazed clay can harbor bacteria. Third, if you glaze the outside and leave the inside unglazed, the unbalanced stress put on the clay by the glaze can crack the pot, especially if you throw thin.

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(A question for anyone:  Stoneware clay fired to cone 6 vitrifies, correct?) is this cone 6 clay? if yes then it may or may not.

I would glaze all interiors made for liquids period. Better product better results.

stronger better if glazed on all sides.

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AS others have said, glaze the interiors of anything functional. Also be careful of clays. Some clay bodies have a range that may be from cone 4-10. Don't think that because it has that range that it is vitrified at ^6. Not anywhere near. I learned the lesson the hard way. All too often the long range clay body will  end up soaking up moisture causing problems with inside and outside glaze as in shivering, crazing and even mold. Best to opt for a tight range clay body and stick to it.

 

best,

Pres

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