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Sputty

The Ceramics Artists Experimenting at a Shuttered Montana Brick Factory

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This looks to be an interesting place/space:

The Ceramics Artists Experimenting at a Shuttered Montana Brick Factory

Anyone here familiar with it, or experienced it?

(Mods feel free to move this post elsewhere - 10 minutes of procrastinating debate, and I still can't work out what sub-forum it should appear under...)

LeeU likes this

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I always took my students on a day trip there (560 miles r/t)  to see what was going on in ceramics. it began in 1951 with Rudy Autio and Peter Voulkos as the first resident artists along with the help of Pete Meloy, Frances Senska- teacher of Rudy and Pete at MSU, and Archie Bray. Back in the 50s Bernard Leach, Yang, and Hamada visited there.  It is still an amazing place. Many well known ceramic artists have worked there. I did a residency there in 2002. The Shaner studio (named after David Shaner)  has been added since then, and there is a new education building that opened last year.  They have a fundraiser underway to improve handicap access. It is located in Helena , Montana on Country Club Road. 

I have attended the 50th and 60th anniversary celebrations. It is a great place for Ceramic Arts!

I had to add these two photos. The first is an iconic photo from the 50s with  l-r  Yanagi, author of the Unknown Craftsman, Bernard Leach , author of the Potters Book, Rudy Autio, Peter Voulkos, and Hamada, a National Living Treasure of Japan. 

This photo was translated in to the other in 2017 for the '65th anniversary Brickyard bash last summer. 

 

Marcia

BrayLeachphoto.jpeg

Bray65th.jpg

Rae Reich and Sputty like this

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This is an hour and a half from me and we visit regularly.  I get all my clay from their store.  Wonderful place.  You are welcome to wander the grounds and in the spring time, there is a special peaceful beauty that cannot be described.

And they have a website.  http://archiebray.org/ 

I would recommend it highly as an attraction to visit on your way through or to.

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