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How to identify bisque ware

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I use a red iron/manganese oxide ink on either green ware or bisque ware.  fires black
 
I make test tiles in bulk, bisque,  and mark them with the ink when they are used.
Recipe:  two scoops of red iron oxide
         two scoop of manganese dioxide
         a few drops of rubbing alcohol to wet the powder mix well with coffee stirrer.
         a water to slurry the powder to ink
        
I use a wooden coffee stirrer for a scoop and make about three spoons full of ink in a small bottle, usually lasts for more than a year. add water as need when the slurry dries.   Apply with fine watercolor brush.
 LT

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Dixon high heat china pencils work too. They are a bit waxy so if you get a bit of glaze on them you can sponge off the glaze without wiping out the pencil writing. They are super inexpensive, like under a dollar each. I've been using them for years for test tiles fired up to cone 7, don't know if they would go higher but since it looks like iron pigment in them I'm assuming they do.

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I used a dental pick and scratched numbers into the ones I forgot to do.  I used Roman Numerals as they are all straight lines, much easier than 2,3,5,6,8,9,0 etc

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I  have used the old number stamps with the rotating bands for a 4 digit number. It works well with the stamp pads like Minnesota clay or ART used to make. I think they are still available. I am not a big fan of manganese oxide, and would rather use plain iron, even though I have several glaze recipes that call for small percentages of manganese.

 

best,

Pres

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On 2/3/2018 at 1:35 PM, Min said:

Dixon high heat china pencils work too. They are a bit waxy so if you get a bit of glaze on them you can sponge off the glaze without wiping out the pencil writing. They are super inexpensive, like under a dollar each. I've been using them for years for test tiles fired up to cone 7, don't know if they would go higher but since it looks like iron pigment in them I'm assuming they do.

I used to use those red ones to label core samples! I didn't know there was a high heat option- thanks! Looks like brown is the only one for high heat though.

Edited by terrim8

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