Jump to content
Pres

QotW: What clay, glaze, or forming technique are you curious to try: but have not?

Recommended Posts

This week a question that I had overlooked, from Tom the glazenerd who asks: QoTW: What clay, glaze, or forming technique are you curious to try: but have not?  (more than one answer is welcome)

This is and interesting question, at my age, I almost think of it as a bucket listing.  I would love to try a wood fire, complete with having some of my own pots in it. I think the whole feeling of community in the firing would be quite invigorating. Almost like going back to college.

I would also like to use a 3D printer to print out a pot, Think that would be cool.  I also realize that the design of a 3D printed piece should/would be different than one made by hand, as I would want to stretch the limits of the 3D software, and the hardware of the printer. 

There is very little else that I would really want to explore, as I already have thrown everything from raku through porcelain, made pots with handbuilding, throwing, pouring and mold making, along with various combinations. Some admittedly were just dabbling, as I usually make my mind up pretty quick whether I like something or not. Raku ate my hands, and at the same time the lack of permanence of the soft vitrification did not please me. Porcelain, it was about the feel, like butter or thick creme in my hands. . . uh uh.

 

best,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slip casting. Not because I want to produce exact replicas in volume. Because slip casting allows for some interesting new possibilities with design. Things that are more linear or geometric. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always wanted to try everything,  I finally realized I needed to focus on one area for my work to improve.   Pres if you ever get to my area of the country,  Wichita State University has a 3 d printer that is the size of a room.  You can rent it by the hour,  you will need to reserve your time way in advance.   My son found a small 3D printer at a DAV that was broken,  he repaired it and wore it out using it so much.  He rebuilt it and took it with him when he moved to Palau,  it was broken while being shipped.  He had me order new parts and he repaired it again.   He took it with him to make things they needed for everyday life.  He did make a duplicate of a wasp nest he found. very cool.   Denice

Joseph F likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to fire a Kazagama. It seems like the absolute perfect solution to my personal needs. A quick firing that I can control and do by myself, the ability to quickly get results and also get the wood ash buildup that leaves crusty beautiful pots. I am in no hurry to get to this point as I have learned to enjoy my journey for what it is and not to quickly rush past the moments, but I still think a Kazama is the perfect one-man solution for my personal journey one day.

Just in case anyone wants to know what kazagama is : https://kazegama.com/

Although now that I have been using real wood ash in electric kilns and getting some pretty neat results maybe I don't need a kazagama!!!   *i  do need one*

Edited by Joseph F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think I've sampled all I want, just wish I was 20 years younger.  I really want to build a wood-fired kiln and invite others to help fire it, but ...........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Chilly said:

 ...  I really want to build a wood-fired kiln and invite others to help fire it, but ...........


Perhaps you should make a miniature wood kiln and fire miniature pots.  I remember a craze about 10 years ago around a small wood kiln about the size of a large watermelon that was fired using small sticks for fuel and air control with a hair dryer.  A student at school make one from high fire clay and fired  some doll house place settings in it.  Cute.  Cold to cold firing in about two hours.   
 
LT
 

Chilly, yappystudent and terrim8 like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5a7218ba65ee2_Crystalcracks1.jpg.0e306604178efb1dbbe0308dafe1df2d.jpg5a7218bc75332_Crystalcracks2.jpg.64355cba46b66c22083df1f43fe4779d.jpg

Crystals...

A potter friend of mine had thrown away a vase with a beautiful crystalline glaze...I was fortunately able to salvage all the pieces (it was just one side of the neck that was broken). I glued that puppy together and it now sits on a shelf with the cracks in the back toward the wall and is a constant inspiration for a journey down a side road of that highway of life. That trip is going to be in the not too distant future...

Thanks, Glazenerd, for all your inspiration over the past six years!

JohnnyK

terrim8 and yappystudent like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is way-way too much that I'd like to try. The stiffer challenge  is to temporarily limit my curiosity to working with what I have at hand, and getting to where I want to go with that.  If I wander off on tangents I will lose momentum for sticking with the "basics" that I am needing to re-master now.  Plus I really don't have the resources to readily/affordably get much into non-electric firing &/or non-commercial clay/glaze at this time. I am looking forward to pending community wood frings and all that entails, so I want to design some  (unusual for me) tall vertical pieces  in the clay John B. recommended to me--the firing is in the anagama he/his students built, and I am wanting to get more of the dramatic effects others have gotten that I have not gotten that much of, since my past pieces for that kiln have been small and short.  

glazenerd and yappystudent like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in agreement with LeeU and somewhat in her boat: small amounts of money which must be allocated wisely. Also I'm quite isolated in my physical area, so w/e new thing I try has to be solo. Also I'm working out getting a kiln, so this is a good question for me personally as I better nail down a group of things to do so I get the right kiln for them. But: 

-I'd like to try more beautiful low-fire glazes for making my own custom art mosaic tiles, then do more mosaics with them. I've tried enough to know I like this but there are tons left to try. 

-that thing where you make glaze pool into a slump of glass-like clear material at the bottom of a concave dish (for use in mosaics of course) 

-paperclay spires and twiddly bits for 3D sculpture

-Old fashioned clay sculpture: as in carving a big hunk of clay down into a figure or creature. 

-Mid-century inspired sculpture, usually formed with slabs. Mainly sci-fi animals and humanoid figures. I like work typified by Lisa Larson (there's a pic of her work in the background of an original star trek episode in the 'movies and tv' thread). I've always had ambitions to do some large, heavy wall sculpture of those subjects too, like in the icon I'm still using. 

 

 

glazenerd likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me: raku firing, silver nitrate reduction. I would love to do some of the impressive detailing work I see here often; but already know I do not have that gift of precision. One day, throw a single pot that would fill my 15.5 electric by itself.  One of these days I want to get around to trying some strontium crystal magic.  

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got hooked on clay initially through raku, and I wanted to try some fuming with heavy metal salts, but I never did get there. Something about my teacher not wanting to turn high school kids loose with something quite that toxic. I kind of forgot about it until Tom mentioned it. 

Currently im trying to wrap my head around surface textures, and how to incorporate some of the slip work and forms that one usually sees in soda/wood kilns, and how to translate those into something that looks just as compelling, but using cone 6 glazing methods.  

Joseph F, glazenerd and terrim8 like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/31/2018 at 12:13 PM, Marcia Selsor said:

I have Ian Gregory's book on alternative kilns. there are quite a few I'd like to try in that book.

Marcia

 

Is that the little paperback with the smooth white wood kiln on the cover? It has a willow branch frame then coated with fire clay??? I want to build that one too but first I have to get around to building a raku kiln.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.