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Ju00Ls

Parian kiln firing question

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Hi,  just a quick beginners kiln firing question;  i'm hoping to fire some Parian sculpture this week in my kiln;  i've never fired Parian before,  can I lay the pieces down on their side to fill the kiln space better or will they mark or stick?   Previously, I had laid my stoneware bisque fired pieces on their side and they came out fine.

Regards
Jules

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Hi @Sputty    the Parian was sold ready mixed as a casting slip from Potclays.co.uk;    a link to the product is here https://www.potclays.co.uk/studio/products/5288/original-parian-semi-porcelain-casting-slip-5lt     I had read about the softening,  I was thinking of hitting 1200c to maybe 1215c range to be on the safe side in case it went too soft and couldn't support itself (no idea to be honest :) ).   If it works out I might well look at Scarva and source the raw ingredients;  with some help from your great Parian topic thread  :-)  (which I will re-read tonight)

Did you have any preferred firing profiles for Parian?   I was just going to use a 2 segment stoneware and tweak the upper last segment to 1215c

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1 hour ago, Sputty said:

Perhaps 'self-glazed' is misleading - we're not talking shiny here. It's a porcelain style body, but very heavily fluxed. At its best, the effect is like no other - a sort of surface translucence, an alabaster sheen, cool and silky, almost like a muted marble surface.

Originally the material was developed to allow reproductions of classical statuary into the homes of the Victorian middle-class, otherwise unable to afford fine art. There was a period of perhaps 30 years where some astonishing work was created by Copeland amongst others, before the tat merchants moved in, produced rubbish, and tastes changed as a result. Almost an entirely British phenomenon - there were a few US producers, but they failed to achieve the refinement (or perhaps even the interest) of the British. And there was little if any interest on mainland Europe.

As far as I know, virtually no-one now produces Parian ware commercially, and those that claim to do so are producing tawdry nonsense (insert well-known anonymous Irish factory here).

The clay sold as Parian by the UK suppliers is, I suspect, a poor substitute for the original formulation. Not that I've tried it, but I have a suspicious mind. Pot-Clays state that theirs, for example, gains a grey cast when taken to higher temps. The Victorians knew a thing or two; shame they forgot to tell anyone.

interesting stuff!

well,  I would assume (hope) potclays comment means "over the recommended" temps.    Anyway, assuming everything is good with the clay etc I will try some pieces at 1240c and also try some at 1200c.   I might have to get another thermocouple before I fire so i'm dead on the mark.

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5 months later and I still haven't fired the pieces - lol;   but now they are in the kiln and I plan to fire it tomorrow morning before I start work;   I will let you know how it goes.

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16 hours ago, High Bridge Pottery said:

I still have some glaze test I should have run 3 years ago :lol:

 

well,  i don't feel so bad now. ;)    

I had some controller issues yesterday so I had to swap out my latest (not properly tested) controller back to the old one,  which meant I couldn't fire,   BUT I did set it going this morning. 

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This was my very first ceramic so it's really hard for me to make any comparisons to other materials, but I really do like to work with Parian. 

The pieces are Charlotte Brontë, Queen and Mandala.    Although I like the finish, I was expecting a half-way between a smooth matt to a silky appearance,  now whether that's the difference between 1200c and 1240c  i've no idea;  it would certainly be worth trying the upper temperatures with this version of Parian slip,  also I suspect the thickness of material and the type of finish on the inside of the mould would also plays a big part in the overall effect.
 

Edited by Ju00Ls

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yes,  I totally agree.     

I do plan on carrying on with Parian but I need to sort out my kiln first; as it needs new elements and a new base to stand on before I fire again with it.  I made a lot of mistakes in my model so i'd like to scrap it and start a new one.  Oh, and I need to finish my diy kiln controller project too!  there are just never enough hours in the day! ;)

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