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Charles

Faceting cuts and rough tearing

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Hello -

 

Charles in Boston here - a sporadic hobbyist and newbie to the forum.

 

I've noticed a number of folks using faceting cuts with adjacent torn, roughly-textured sections between them. 

 

My supposition is that the cuts are made and then the remaining clay is left en situ while
drying takes place, which is what causes the rough surface when this section is broken off. 

 

http://thebesttimeoftheday.blogspot.com/2011/03/jonathan-cross.html

 

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/1a/1b/5a/1a1b5af98ede5823d73bc84c2e0bbca2.jpg

 

https://www.etsy.com/listing/499699799/one-of-a-kind-wood-fired-yunomi?ref=shop_home_active_80

 

I realize the cup in the second image doesn't have the clearly defined chisel marks that Jonathan Cross pieces usually have, and no doubt these greatly help to sharply delineate start and stop points for the tearing.  In this case I suspect the cuts were made, but then the cut clay was left to dangle while the still attached end-point dried up some before the tear.


What I'm wondering is if you just let it air-dry, or use a hair-dryer or heat gun in the areas where you want the break?  I'm curious if any particular motion of tear or break provides the best texture.  Or - and most likely, is this just something that I will need to discover for myself?

 

Also - the Pottery Park pieces often seem to have an unusual "layered" texture under the tear, but I have no idea of what is causing this - any guesses?

 

Lastly - while admitting the addictive nature of Pinterest, I'm starting to feel loathing in that its proliferation makes it almost impossible to find the original source of a photo using Google image search.

 

Charles

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1 hour ago, Charles said:

Lastly - while admitting the addictive nature of Pinterest, I'm starting to feel loathing in that its proliferation makes it almost impossible to find the original source of a photo using Google image search.

Yep! More than a little annoying, isn't it?

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I like to do smooth and rough, cut and torn stuff...more box-like than bowls.  I  chisel and tear wet or leather hard, or make creases and let the clay dry a bit before ripping. Sometimes I crack areas off after it is bone dry. I do not often try for a pre-desired effect or pattern--it is much more fun (to me) to just go with my instincts and see what happens.  Then again, I'm not looking to sell something for hundreds of dollars and am fairly ignorant about  the history and parameters of certain forms.  My guess is the texture in last one was made by scraping/digging (not tearing) when it was just a tidge shy of leather hard, but someone else may have other ideas.  Edit: arrrghhh---how the heck do you resize so a photo does not come up so huge--they  never used to do this :(   1/6 Yee Haw---thanks to Min, I was able to resize.  

DSCF3234.JPG.48df4f766d65da1b31b3006461132e2a.JPG

Edited by LeeU

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Lee - thanks for the comments.

> My guess is the texture in last one was made by scraping/digging (not tearing) when it was just a tidge shy of leather hard, but someone else may have other ideas. 

To my eyes it's too "delicate" for that. 

What I'm seeing is a series of very shallow ridges, with most of them less than 1 mm thick.  Sort of like layers of miniature sedimentary rock that have been broken away?

I also see an uneven surface texture, so don't know how that could be achieved by any kind of scraping motion.

However - I know nothing of the internal structure of clay, so it could be something quite natural that I'm just ignorant of.

 

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On 1/5/2018 at 10:05 PM, LawPots said:

You might try carving into leather-hard and then tear.  

I’ve never made surfaces like the ones in OP’s links, but this approach gets my vote. You’ll need a sharp metal tool to cut the smooth planes into leather hard clay, then tear the rest,

As for the layered appearance of the rough surfaces in the third link, I haven’t a clue. The description says “Faceted shape and original texture made in very special way.” Which indicates the artist does not wish to share the technique. I’m fine with allowing artists to keep their techniques to themselves if they wish. 

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You may find that one  of my favorite faceting tools,  the potato peeler, will work quite well for the technique in the leather hard clay as you can make repeated cuts to depth, and break/tear off as needed. This is what I think is being done in the second image.

 

best,

Pres

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My guess as to the layers is that they actually ARE layers or they are cuts into the clay and ripped away. I'm sure there are dozens and dozens of ways to do it. Akira Satake does it very well. I find that well grogged clay makes for the rough tears and if there is little or no grog then it will tear away almost cleanly with just a light texture. Of course this all depends on the direction of tearing and such and what you want out of the end product  

Take a small block of clay, cut into it with a wire a dozen or more times and rip that portion of clay off, you get a really nice layered effect. 

 Akira-Satake-work-4.jpg

What I don't like, for my personal work anyways, is having the scoring marks where I want to break a piece off but then there is that very slight line of perfection before the rough edge. Maybe I can do something with that specifically but I haven't thought of anything yet. I like the very natural look. Akira likes his work to have the natural AND the straight lines combined for some of his work. But those works are clearly made with that in mind. Such as the vase below. 

Anyways, just have a good think on it, implement and if it doesnt work, surely more ideas will come from that, and think again, etc.. and have fun with it. All we really do is to play with mud after all. Its very serious, and absolutely not serious, both at the same time. Like Straw Dogs :-)

Akira-Satake-work-2.jpg

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On 1/5/2018 at 11:09 PM, LeeU said:

Edit: arrrghhh---how the heck do you resize so a photo does not come up so huge--they  never used to do this :(   1/6 Yee Haw---thanks to Min, I was able to resize.  

 

I couldn't resize my pics either ... sorry peeps! :-(

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