Jump to content
Rockhopper

How much clay for kitchen canisters ?

Recommended Posts

I agreed to try to make a set of 3 canisters for my wife, to go with the wall tiles I'm making for the backsplash in our kitchen.  The largest would need to be big enough to hold five pounds of flour. 

Most of my throwing has been mugs, bowls, and a few relatively small vases - nothing over about three pounds starting weight.   I know I would need more than that, but have no real idea how much more.  I realize there are a number of factors that could influence the answer, but would appreciate suggestions for a good starting point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would suggest 10#s 7#s  3.5 to 4#s

I throw mine out of Porcelain I make 3 and 4 piece sets. For a 4 piece I downsized the smallest size .Stoneware throws better so less clay would be needed and your skill level will also be a factor in throwing .

I never thought about the largest  one as holding 5#s of flour so you may have to tune up that size but I think my largest would hold that.I'm just not buying flour in a 5# bag enough to know that size..

My lids are always measured in metric -largest 20mm next 16mm and smallest 13mm.

My throwing weights for all my production  items are in the next issue of Ceramic Monthly (February issue) if you want to know more.

I always have 3-4 sets on my booth for art show.

Edited by Mark C.
Rae Reich likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mark!  

I'm throwing Standard #112 stoneware...  and skill level (or lack of) will definitely be a factor.  I've made a few pieces the same height as the largest one I'm aiming for - but they've all been vases, about half the diameter.  But.. hey, it's new-year's eve... what better time to start making plans to 'expand' my skills ;)

I just measured the large one I would be replacing ...  it's approx. 6.5 - 7" across x 8" high not including the domed lid...  How does that compare with your 10# size ? 

 

11 hours ago, Mark C. said:

My lids are always measured in metric -largest 20mm next 16mm and smallest 13mm.

I'm guessing you mean cm ?   Those sizes in mm, converted to inches would be (approx):   3/4" , 5/8",  and 1/2".      If cm, it's approx.  8", 6", and 5"

Edited by Rockhopper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, D.M.Ernst said:

You might try throwing two short cylinders of the same diameter and joining them to make the height you need.

Thanks DM.   Just watched this video a few days ago, showing it done that way.  Definitely something I'm considering.    Might be a few weeks before I get 'round to tackling this project, but will post results when I do.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/31/2017 at 10:02 AM, Rockhopper said:

Thanks Mark!  

I'm throwing Standard #112 stoneware...  and skill level (or lack of) will definitely be a factor.  I've made a few pieces the same height as the largest one I'm aiming for - but they've all been vases, about half the diameter.  But.. hey, it's new-year's eve... what better time to start making plans to 'expand' my skills ;)

I just measured the large one I would be replacing ...  it's approx. 6.5 - 7" across x 8" high not including the domed lid...  How does that compare with your 10# size ? 

 

I'm guessing you mean cm ?   Those sizes in mm, converted to inches would be (approx):   3/4" , 5/8",  and 1/2".      If cm, it's approx.  8", 6", and 5"

I also have made canisters,  using 112. I kept  things simple 8, 6, 4. these were all thrown with lids first off of the hump,  then the cylinders.Your measurements for size seem about right.

besst,

Pres

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.