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I throw with mostly slip/dryish so I don't even notice it except for when I am centering against the bat. Since I throw mostly off the hump nowadays I don't have to center against the bat much. When I do center against the bat I have just started using a sponge against the base of my hand on the left-hand side and it seems to work out okay. I definitely get exfoliated though! = )

I am mostly concerned with the absorption. I am testing that now, got my two tiles in water for 24 hours. Tomorrow I will report back on the absorption of adding the grit.

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joseph, a thousand years ago i was using a gritty clay.  trying to center a huge lump, more than 12 pounds i used the top of a leather boot as a sleeve and centered with my forearm.  this was back in the 1970s when everyone wore boots almost to the knee.  when the sole wore out i just cut it below the ankle and it worked great.  was able to make large bowls with it to start the centering.

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The results are in. @glazenerd

The first clay body mixture weighed: 25.50g before water and 25.77g after, so 1%.

The second body mixture which is more porcelain than stoneware was 16.63g before(thinner tile) and 16.76g after, so less than 1% absorption. 

So I don't think the chicken grit, sand, and course grog had that much effect on the body porosity. I am going to put the tiles back in the water and weigh again tomorrow to see if it increases any.

It makes me want to lean towards the darker tile 2 more, but I really like the more stoneware tile better. I think 1% is acceptable enough, considering who leaves their pots in water all night long fully submerged in a sealed container. lol.

BlackDog, did you find any granite grit? I really can't wait to see what you do with it and that slip you formulated.

 

Edited by Joseph F

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Joseph, I just ordered a bag of chicken scratch after seeing your results. I have some wood fires coming up, but I usually fire reduction gas. Would the granite pop off and possibly hurt glazed pots around it at cone 10, or was it pretty stable? I don't want to risk hurting the other pots while experimenting.

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1 hour ago, douglas said:

Joseph, I just ordered a bag of chicken scratch after seeing your results. I have some wood fires coming up, but I usually fire reduction gas. Would the granite pop off and possibly hurt glazed pots around it at cone 10, or was it pretty stable? I don't want to risk hurting the other pots while experimenting.

Douglas I honestly have no idea how it will fair at cone 10. I fire electric which is super predictable usually. I would maybe do some research to see what other people have done with it at those temps. The granite chips have never flaked of so far. They sort of barely melt into the clay. Some of them have little brown drops oozing from them.

Sorry I can't be more help.

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Douglas,

Take a small spoonfool of the scratch and place it in a  test cup in your next gas reduction cone 10 firing;  see what happens to the crushed granite.  Choose a spot for you 'test' in the  gas fired kiln to be as representative of a wood kiln environment as you can get -- like hot and/or heavy reduction.
 
I expect some chunks will  will just lay there and some will start to melt.
LT

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Depends on the chemistry of your granite but most granites I have met are pretty well behaved.  I have melted some and it does not really pop or even spit much.  Problem is more that it won’t really melt all that well.  Kind of like small chunks with rounded-off edges.

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So here's the results. My granite scratch didn't work out as I hoped. Didn't notice any melting and just turned whitish so now I have a huge sack of chicken granite...

In the picture here  I ran some dark stoneware through a cheese grater and bisque fired along with some blue porcelain. Applied a thick layer of slip and just dusted the grog on and knocked off whatever didn't stick. Threw on some glaze and sponged down a few times to make sure everything was cemented in place. Pretty happy with how this technique works out texture wise. Next time I'll use a no crack slip and probably something other than a yellow glaze! After messing around with it I think adding Xantham gum to the slip  helped pick up more bits of grog and stopped it from drying immediately on bone dry. 

 

texture.jpg

Edited by BlackDogPottery

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On 2/26/2018 at 11:32 PM, BlackDogPottery said:

So here's the results. My granite scratch didn't work out as I hoped. Didn't notice any melting and just turned whitish so now I have a huge sack of chicken granite...

In the picture here  I ran some dark stoneware through a cheese grater and bisque fired along with some blue porcelain. Applied a thick layer of slip and just dusted the grog on and knocked off whatever didn't stick. Threw on some glaze and sponged down a few times to make sure everything was cemented in place. Pretty happy with how this technique works out texture wise. Next time I'll use a no crack slip and probably something other than a yellow glaze! After messing around with it I think adding Xantham gum to the slip  helped pick up more bits of grog and stopped it from drying immediately on bone dry. 

 

texture.jpg

I somehow missed this photo all together black dog.  It looks like some type of candy bar, very textural. What are you plans for this? Are you still exploring?

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