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Pres

QothW:What are the most important design elements?

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Evelyne, asked a series of questions  in the question pool of which I will pick one for this week. Her question was: What are the most important design elements? So I started thinking. . .clarification. . . or should I leave it open ended. Hmmmm!

First off if I were to define the Elements as Line, Shape, Form, Texture, Value, Space,  and Color. . . that might help. It may also help to say that the Elements are arranged in different ways, and these are described by the Principles of Art. Maybe now we have a beginning, but wait. . .is she asking in general, or in our own work???  Wow, in general, I believe them all to be important.

In my own work, I have always had an emphasis on Form, nearly everything I do ceramic depends on a strong form. For years, Line and Shape was important on the surface often to create movement of the eye throughout the form. Then Color & Value became very important as I worked with blown stains over a bristol glaze, with added brush strokes. Lately, however, the forms have changed, and the surface has become heavily textured. So much so that I really don't want a lot of busy brush strokes or color all over the pot. Usually preferring of late to use glaze layers that break over texture accenting it and changing color as they do so. 

best,

Pres

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Form and function for me dictates all others-at least in my own work.

My customers will not come back if its not working well.I depend on them returning so function is big.

I do wow them with bright glazes that others are not using.

Edited by Mark C.

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Form and visual unity. I make simple minimalist pots and use restrained glaze colours, I try and have the two work together. I also feel touch is important, silky glazes that feel good in the hand and pots that feel balanced in weight. Don't know, is touch or feel a design element? My forms and glazes tend to reflect me, I’m not big on overly fussy cat licked design or wild colours. I appreciate it in others work but it’s not what I’m comfortable making. And like Mark said the pots have to work.

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Given the degree of self indulgence working with clay is for me, and given that  it is not used to generate income, the core  design elements for me are: (1) how does the piece feel-do I like how it feels when I pretend I am blind, which I do to judge how it feels to me-the physical surface/texture, and the non-visual reading of the form; (2) coloration-of unglazed clay, and glazes--I gotta like the coloration in addition to the feel of the thing; (3) purpose-does the piece express my intention sufficiently that I am not left with the realization that I missed the mark-if I did, out it goes; (4) a recently emerging interest--how does the fired clay sound when tapped with something, and;  does the piece make sense to anyone else (a bonus when it does, and a desire on my part that it do so). 

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I go with form for most of my work. (slabs are the exception. I like them flat. I prefer my forms to have a strong contour to contrast with the surface patterns. I don't make that much functional work anymore. "but when I do" I focus on function and form., balance and comfort to use.

 

Marcia

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