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Achilles

Wax resist mistake: please help

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In applying wax to the foot of a pot, I accidentally got a drip on the side where I want to glaze. What is the best way to remove this, other than re-bisquing the pot? I am trying to get it into a glaze firing that will be loaded tonight, so re-bisquing isn't an option for me.

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Is it wax resist or wax?

If wax and cooling, I scrape off the surface layer and then stone grind the spot a little, wipe with damp cloth. After glazjng if not a good coat, I dab a little extra glaze there.

 

I know which glazes will tolerate this.

Others I just rebsque,not worth the wastage.

clay lover likes this

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Thanks, everyone, for the helpful replies. 

I suspect I may end up with a disappointing result because I don't have time to re-bisque, but I will try a combination of the heat gun, sanding and dabbing extra glaze methods that were suggested as alternatives. 

@Babs, it is green Aftosa wax. I thought wax and wax resist were synonymous. Is there a difference?

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There are many kinds of resist-hot paraffin -runny water based waxes-Mobilizer wax from petroleum based materials. Latex resits-the list goes on and that all act differently .

I have had pretty good luck with my tips listed above-just had one in this last bunch of fires that came out fine without rebisquing.

The best tip I have is wipe it up with a wet sponge immediately before it dries then sand.Always keep that wet sponge handy when waxing .

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Mark said it,bad choice of words omb, wax resist,the technique,, various waxes as Mark listed , I meant solid wax requiring melting, and the other stuff.

good luck

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My advice to students, when using wax, "If you intend to use a glaze somewhere, don't get wax in that spot!"  We use the liquid wax resist, and I've tried a variety method for removing it (Scraping, sanding, burning with a flame).    None were completely successful.  

Sanding and scraping only get the surface bits, but the wax that got into the porous inner layers still remains.  Trying to burn it off is probably worse, since it leaves a bigger mess behind with carbon and such, and still doesn't solve the problem.  

Latex and paper resists are definitely better, in this regard.  If you make a mistake, you can always remove the resist and redo it.

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I get a little wax where it should not be at least every month and with the techniques I posted its always not an issue. The trick is wet sponge fast-grind away the spot with dremil or heavy sanding -if you really want to be sure rub with same clay bisque ware as a sanding pad.The heat with torch is also very good if the area is larger -just be fast with that  torch .

I never rebisque.I do large volumes of work and this works.My was is Moblizer cer-A -which by the way is no longer available.

Edited by Mark C.

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I know this too late to help @Achilles, but for anyone else who is having the same problem, I've had good success with a Kemper SMS rubbing stone. Lots of clay suppliers sell them. I use it for both liquid cold wax and hot melted soy wax. First I scrape off as much wax as possible with a metal tool, then I rub the spot with the rubbing stone. I keep going until I've removed a layer or two of clay as well. Sometimes a bare spot will still appear after dipping the pot in glaze, but it's usually small enough to dab glaze over it with a small brush.

IMG_1260.jpg.f0c3d1ee88bc5e890e6766a3215bbd6e.jpg

Joseph F likes this

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That what I do with my Dremel tool . Take off a few layers of clay-I also use  these  tools for glaze runs.I could not life without them since I use them for many usrs.I use the green carbide bits in them.

I stock up on bits when on sale.

The tubing stones are also great as Mea points out I use the larger ones on tough pot bottoms where the diamond pads fail to get it done.

Edited by Mark C.

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