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Glazes That Break

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Thank you Marcia, Joseph and  Neal for the glaze postings. I am now using the SC Hazelnut Brown with Cream Rust over. . . works well. However, will be working soon with the SC 630 which considering the white clay body vs the darker brown, the glazes may have major change. Time for some test shot glasses.

 

 

best,

Pres

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10 minutes ago, Pres said:

Thank you Marcia, Joseph and  Neal for the glaze postings. I am now using the SC Hazelnut Brown with Cream Rust over. . . works well. However, will be working soon with the SC 630 which considering the white clay body vs the darker brown, the glazes may have major change. Time for some test shot glasses.

 

 

best,

Pres

Funny you should mention that, I've got a batch of test shot glasses going into the bisque kiln tonight! I've got a glaze that I've been working on for several weeks that is finally ready for some bigger tests. Hopefully all will be good and I con move up to mug tests next week!

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1 minute ago, Marcia Selsor said:

Joseph,

Please always include temperature and atmosphere when posting glazes. I couldn't find cone anywhere with those very nice glazes you posted. I like thermion the black clay.

Marcia

It is funny that you mention this. Because I literally said that people should be doing this on the currie tile thread but then I didn't do it here! I will edit them to include the schedule I used when I fired them.

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12 hours ago, RonSa said:

My kiln has a sitter and I don't know a way to slow cool so for the most part I let nature take its own course.

Put a shelf inside the top below lid. Add ceramic fiber on the lid. these will help slow cool.

Marcia

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12 hours ago, Marcia Selsor said:

Put a shelf inside the top below lid. Add ceramic fiber on the lid. these will help slow cool.

Marcia

Good idea,thanks

 

4 hours ago, Babs said:

Ronsa, I used to ,after the sitter dropped, lift it back up, put a weight on the latch, repress the start button, and hold or fire down manually depending. Have to be hands on and log your actions, but doable ,new word.

I do that when I'm glaze firing to do a hold I never reconsidered doing that for a controlled cool down. Thanks

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I once placed cer. Fib. On an old kiln lid. It had a little swing cover over a hole on top of kiln. I don't know what it ws for cos I wouldn't be looking down there! Any way the little swing cover melted.

Edited by Babs

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On 11/29/2017 at 8:23 AM, RonSa said:

My kiln has a sitter and I don't know a way to slow cool so for the most part I let nature take its own course.

if you use a pyrometer, you can turn the kiln back on by gently pushing the button on the setter. Do this at your preferred temp. say 1800 or 1900 and watch it for 1/2 an hour or more. then shut it off. To slow the cooling you could add a kiln shelf or 2 at the top of the load. More mass will hold the heat.

Marcia

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On 11/29/2017 at 3:12 PM, Pres said:

Glad to hear that someone else thinks the shot glass test is worth doing. I try to take much of my glaze test problems out on them as they are easy, take up little kiln space and much easier to judge glaze quality that a test tile.

best,

Pres

toothpick holders are about the same size. 

 

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About slowing down the kiln cooling

Quote

Add ceramic fiber on the lid.

I've started looking at ceramic fiber and see its listed as #4 #6 and #8. Normally if something weighs 8lbs it can be listed as 8#. In your opinion is this a typo from the vendor selling it or is it like metal gauges, the small the number the thicker it is?

Then there's 1" or 2" thick, no-brainer, thicker = more insulation.

I read something that the wool needs to be top coated, is this necessary or can I just spread the blanket on top just when the sitter falls?

On 12/2/2017 at 8:07 AM, Marcia Selsor said:

if you use a pyrometer, you can turn the kiln back on by gently pushing the button on the setter. Do this at your preferred temp. say 1800 or 1900 and watch it for 1/2 an hour or more. then shut it off.

I also plan on purchasing a pyrometer

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Ron, not sure about the stuff you've got in US, but it had a reputation for being hazardous to user re. Inhaling it as breaks down. I had a gas kiln lined with it and yes it was coated, top loader, roof sagged and became friable with age.

Marcia knows, she uses it in the method above ie moving it to place on lid, but I wouldn't be stuffing around with it continuously,

Does come in lots of forms now, bats of it.

I'd try firing without it first to see results of firing down with pyrometer.

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4 hours ago, RonSa said:

I've started looking at ceramic fiber

Ron, I would check which type of ceramic fibre you get. The older stuff was really nasty stuff as far as the silica getting into your lungs and staying there. Superwool from Morgan Thermal Ceramics is made to, in theory, be dissolved into lung fluid and is supposed to be far safer. (still sounds yuk doesn't it?) Their health and safety info for it is here, it's for the EU, couldn't find the North American one, I believe they manufacture it on the west coast on this side of the pond. More info here.

Edited by Min
added another link plus changed a word

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This is the only info I can come up with

Quote

INSWOOL HP is a high purity blanket that is made from a 50 x 50 blend of Alumina and Silica that has superior tensile strength and handling capabilities.

If the stuff breaks down and causes silica to become airborne its definitely not for me. Considering the possible health hazard it would be cheaper to buy a new kiln with a controller instead of getting a lung full of the stuff .

Thanks for the heads up

 

Here's the link to the product's page

Edited by Guest
added link

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2 hours ago, RonSa said:

This is the only info I can come up with

If the stuff breaks down and causes silica to become airborne its definitely not for me. Considering the possible health hazard it would be cheaper to buy a new kiln with a controller instead of getting a lung full of the stuff .

Thanks for the heads up

 

Here's the link to the product's page

There are lots of kilns that use ceramic blankets in their construction, just have to do some research as to the safety aspects for the use you intend it for. Sorry, not trying to sound preachy but no point in throwing the baby out with the bath water. Think others here know more about this than I do.

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Ron

They now make safer fiber and its marketed as that.Check out eBay for this.

As to 4#-6 #and 8# thats the density number. You pay more for denser material which is also a but heaver . Raku kilns that are low temp you can use 4-6 # but high fire hot face should always be 8#.-Fiber hazards need to be looked and and addressed . Just as clay makes dust which is a silica hazard.

 

 

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