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lytruong

L&L easy fire front loading kiln

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Hi everyone, 

Im thinking of purchasing an L&L front loading that is 6.7 cubic (the model number is eFL1626). I love all my L&Ls so I'm thinking of sticking with the brand. 

However, this particular model does not have elements on the door. Is that something i should be worried about? I do 05/5-6 about 3-5 firings per week. 

Im planning to get this kiln with the moving casters so i can easily move it around (imagine when you bring your kiln in for maintenance, you just put it on a leash and pull it like a pup!) 

I'm aware its twice more than the top loading, but i hope this will be better for my back (i plan to do this for another 70 years! so gotta take care of my body now :) )

Thanks in advance for all your comments everyone! One day i will be experienced enough to offer advices as well, not just taking it. 

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@lytruong I spoke wit L&L about this, and they said that the door contains an additional layer of insulation- 1" of microporous insulation- that compensates for any heat loss out the door.  Below is a photo showing cones from one of their test firings. The left cone was in the front by the door, the right cone was in the back.

5a14993d062cd_EFLCones.png.1aa0f2863d64a179d6dc16f0880e81a8.png

The EFL series are pretty brilliant, IMO. They have the benefits of a front loader, but a construction style that is more akin to a top loader, which keeps the cost way down. I think it could be a real game changer.

Edited by neilestrick
Roberta12, Joseph F and LeeU like this

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These kilns appear to be top loader turned on their sides with a swing door. Or they have that look to them.You can see the curve of the stainless on bottom.They look well thought out. Easier to load for sure.

Reasonable prices as well for front loaders.

Edited by Mark C.

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One thing I will point out is that consider the venting setup when thinking about the unit being portable. I had a duh moment when I did the exact same thing and ordered the super duper $500 cart for a kiln last year. The stand was built to handle a tank so I ended up being happy with it and love the way it extends beyond the sides of the bottom of the kiln but after setting up I could really not without a huge hassle, roll it to the side.

As a side note, yes I do know the regular stands that just go under the kilns are fine, have a larger oval that has been sitting on one for going on ten years and its just fine. it just looks so wrong and the sturdy cart that encases the whole bottom looks so rightB)  

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@lytruong don't know how tall you are but when I had a front loader I had the stand built so the hearth was 6" lower than the specs. It was still too tall to load so I put a plywood covered pallet in front of it to stand on. Hearth height is 40" for the L&L one, don't know if this might be an issue? If you do have to put something in front of it to stand on then that bottom shelf on the stand would be covered.

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I happen to like front loaders, and yes they save the back.

image.png.92898170d7976d278a4b11d7fe9fb5e9.png

I find they heat the body very well on colder days. Cook turkeys for 60, roast two pigs, or boil 100 dozen eggs.

No elements in this door either, which is okay as long as you are not firing highly technical glazes like crystalline. The top upper right corner is slightly higher, and the lower front ledge is slightly colder because it draws some air at peak temps: when static heat pushes the door open ever so slightly. Does great for cone 6, the temperature variances are not great enough to effect a standard cone six melt. This Paragon Super Dragon is just over 15 CF and holds lots and lots of pieces. It has 3" brick with 2" fiber insulation. Notice the 400 amp panel right behind it: it does draw some power.

LeeU likes this

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On 11/21/2017 at 2:50 AM, lytruong said:

I'm aware its twice more than the top loading, but i hope this will be better for my back (i plan to do this for another 70 years! so gotta take care of my body now :) )

Thanks in advance for all your comments everyone! One day i will be experienced enough to offer advices as well, not just taking it. 

Have you loaded a front-loader before?

If not, be aware that holding a shelf on the ends of your fingers as you try to balance it on the posts without touching the glaze load on the shelf below, can be as trying for your back as loading a top-loader.

I use both and always wish I was loading the other one as my back complains.

Babs likes this

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19 hours ago, Chilly said:

Have you loaded a front-loader before?

If not, be aware that holding a shelf on the ends of your fingers as you try to balance it on the posts without touching the glaze load on the shelf below, can be as trying for your back as loading a top-loader.

I use both and always wish I was loading the other one as my back complains.

One of the advantages of a front-loader is that you can, with a little planning and a ruler, place the shelves before loading the kiln. You might leave a bit greater clearance to allow for moving the pots back without bumping the glaze off. 

glazenerd likes this

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but can you tumble stack a bisque?

I love being able to see my pots from above in a glaze fire pack, so clear.

I have used front loaders, didn't like the packing. Almost went looking for a long shafted dentist's mirror to check nothing was too close.shelves at arm's length wasn't appealing either, though one day I may be found in an inversion in my top loader:-)))

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On 11/25/2017 at 9:37 PM, Babs said:

but can you tumble stack a bisque?

I love being able to see my pots from above in a glaze fire pack, so clear.

I have used front loaders, didn't like the packing. Almost went looking for a long shafted dentist's mirror to check nothing was too close.shelves at arm's length wasn't appealing either, though one day I may be found in an inversion in my top loader:-)))

I admit it's painful to even think of loading shelves the way you describe. This old lady puts her left hand under the shelf and her right hand holds the back edge from above, usually. 

 

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not tall,, or long here and so reaching into to place shelf carefully onto posts was a stress on this old lady:-) but amazing what can be done when driven! Prob. Go for a walk in one next life..

Rae Reich likes this

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