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      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.
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graybeard

Bisque firing OOPs

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Hi all.

I fired a load of bisque Wed. evening (standard 630 ^5) when I checked Thursday A.M. the kiln was still firing (way too long) so I shut it off

and cried a little.  When I opened the kiln this A.M. (Friday) The pieces looked ok, (not melted) but I don't know how hot things got.

I had 3 witness in the kiln (06 05 04) and they are all pretty flat, my question is, is there a way to tell if the pieces will still take

glaze, or if the clay has vitrified?

Thanks for your time.

Graybeard      

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Guest JBaymore

Dip your finger in water and touch it to the pot.  If it sort of absorbed into the ware relatively quickly, you have some hope of getting a layer of glaze material onto them in a somewhat "normal" manner.  If the water just sits there..... it is possible, but tough to get a layer thick enough.

Let us know more what you got, and we'll help to see if you need to alter application method.

best,

.................john

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In my early clay classes I had some stoneware and porcelain mugs in a bisque that went unknowably high. John's wet-fingertip would have demonstrated no absorption.  As we all were encouraged to experiment with techniques, I oven-warmed them and painted (with some difficulty) commercial cone 06 glazes. It would have been nice to know about sticky additives like corn syrup or gum tragacanth. I slowly heated our little raku kiln loaded with these experiments to 06 and managed to finish with usable mugs. Although the bright candy colors were unfashionable in those days of 70's earthy stoneware, I was inspired by Ken Price and Ron Nagle's beginning to branch out into low fires.

Good luck, the candy colors are acceptable now and low fires can effectively mimic stoneware glazes too, so the world is your oyster!

Arnold Howard and Pres like this

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