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dAO

tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze

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14 hours ago, Min said:

It's a lot worse than that! Cost of a passport is less than some of the markups, some are just ludicrous like this one versus this.  We use a shipping drop box place in WA and order a fair amount of supplies in then make a run across the border to pick them up. Even with the occasional duty charge it's worth it for a heck of a lot of stuff.

   

 

Tell you what,  we'll make a deal between the two countries.  The U.S. will give the Canadians our goods, for the same price, and you just slip us some of that sweet, sweet cheap prescription medications...

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Hey everybody ... friendly reminder time ... it's ok to make a quick joke about US pharmaceuticals. But please don't turn this into a discussion about the cost of pharmaceuticals or healthcare in the US, which is very much a political subject now. Let's talk ceramics. Thank you!

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15 hours ago, Min said:

It's a lot worse than that! Cost of a passport is less than some of the markups, some are just ludicrous like this one versus this.  We use a shipping drop box place in WA and order a fair amount of supplies in then make a run across the border to pick them up. Even with the occasional duty charge it's worth it for a heck of a lot of stuff.

   

The cost of ordering from the states is bordering on extortion. The last 16 dollar tool turned into 70 canadian after the freight brokers held it hostage. We let it rot at the border and chalked it up to an expensive reminder to ask VERY specific questions. We will think long and hard about ordering from anywhere in the u.s. from now on.

iirc packages labeled educational will avoid getting kidnapped by freight brokers.

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3 minutes ago, C.Banks said:

The cost of ordering from the states is bordering on extortion. The last 16 dollar tool turned into 70 canadian after the freight brokers held it hostage. We let it rot at the border and chalked it up to an expensive reminder to ask VERY specific questions. We will think long and hard about ordering from anywhere in the u.s. from now on.

iirc packages labeled educational will avoid getting kidnapped by freight brokers.

Good to know about getting an educational label to avoid their ridiculous brokerage fees. If I'm getting something sent direct from the US to Canada I'll only do it if it ships US Postal Service and try and keep the amount under $25 CA  so avoid the brokerage fees altogether. Even if I split an order up into 2 parcels it's still worth it most times.

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I am so glad to hear that someone else despises those tiny nozzled squeeze bottles.  I simply can not get them to work for anything.   going looking for a ruling pen.  

I love how reading through various questions on this forum sets me off on the next journey!

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8 hours ago, andros said:
I just use a brush with a sort of buffer with pretty liquid underglazes, it takes some time to learn how to use them properly but they work well ...

37777.jpg

I've never seen anything like this - is it an Italian product? What is it usually used for? I like the design. 

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On 12/7/2017 at 10:05 AM, dAO said:

Update for anyone following:  I've been trying these various suggestions with some amount of success.  What I'm happiest with so far (like....really happy)  is the Minnesota Clay Graffito paper.  It's a much fast method than anything I've tried to date:  as fast as simply tracing a design and it's a really clean, solid  and smooth line, completely variable in width depending on what type of tool I use.   At first, I was having trouble with it sliding around a bit, but I found that completely taping it down and just scribing over the tape works really well.  

$15 for 6 9"x9" sheets seems expensive to this stingy potter. I would be trying to make my own by coating various papers with underglaze to see what would both hold the material and release it. First I would try regular tracing paper and then spray on hairspray as a fixative. There's an acid free paste for paper that doesn't wrinkle it called Yes! (Amazon) that might make a good medium for the underglaze. It doesn't make the paper too stiff to bend around a pot.  

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rae, try looking at the post i made last year.  use "search" and Kim Kirchman.  it should take you to the photos i posted after watching her demo.  the paper is just a low cost newsprint.

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14 hours ago, Rae Reich said:

I've never seen anything like this - is it an Italian product? What is it usually used for? I like the design. 

Yes, it's an Italian product even if I have no idea if is sold and\or is used also elsewere ... usually is used to do fine and long lines with underglazes... basically it acts like the big brushes of some post above... many Italian traditional pottery make extensive use of undergalzes, like sicilian and Deruta pottery (and many others...) and this kind of brush is used for it.

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1 hour ago, Sputty said:

unfortunately the originating website has disappeared

What's the URL, maybe its still retrievable

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In italian it can be called "pennello per ceramica con serbatoio" (brush for ceramic with reservoir). It's available only in specialized  shops or in well stocked fine art stores ... or on-line of course! Anyway as Sputty has rightly said, you can easily derive it from a "normal" brush... I buy it only because I'm lazy...!

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Hi folks, 

I have used liner or rigger brushes for fine nervous lines as in drawing trees, branches and other things with stains and thinned glazes and underglazes. These work well for lines that are "unplanned" have a tendency to be able to go thick and thin with varied pressure. If held near the ferrule they are controlled, if held further back, more natural in line.

Winsor and Newton Sceptre Gold II Brush Rigger Short Handle 3 best, Pres 

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The most expensive brush in history, if sent from Italy to the US! I tried to order some mason stains from US (in Italy stains are not easily available since are used almost only by industries) and the delivery charges was definitely huge... 

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33 minutes ago, Pres said:

Hi folks, 

I have used liner or rigger brushes for fine nervous lines as in drawing trees, branches and other things with stains and thinned glazes and underglazes. These work well for lines that are "unplanned" have a tendency to be able to go thick and thin with varied pressure. If held near the ferrule they are controlled, if held further back, more natural in line.

Winsor and Newton Sceptre Gold II Brush Rigger Short Handle 3 best, Pres 

Yes also the linear is very good for quick spontaneous lines!

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On 12/14/2017 at 1:28 PM, oldlady said:

rae, try looking at the post i made last year.  use "search" and Kim Kirchman.  it should take you to the photos i posted after watching her demo.  the paper is just a low cost newsprint.

Thanks, Lady! Just spent some quality time exploring your Kim Kirchman info. Seems like something similar can be done on bisque, per Preeta's video.

Back to the original question, tho, for a form of tracing paper similar to graphite transfer, but with underglaze, wetting the whole transfer wouldn't work. A dry process is what is wanted. :)

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There are a few ideas here, #1 or #3 might be worth a try. I'm thinking that they would smudge really easily though, maybe some Stay Flow Liquid starch added would help bind it?

I just ordered some Pentel water brushes, I'll post results when I've given them a try. They have small reservoirs so probably just for detail work if they work at all.

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