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Mark (Marko) Madrazo

Cone 5 pottery

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I was wondering, if I fire a cone 5 clay for cups, mugs, plates, etc. will they be leak free like stoneware? And would a commercial glaze be better than a glaze recipe from a book? I want to make some functional ware but I have nightmares if someone bought a piece from me and it leaked or cracked in an oven.

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bciskepottery    925

If your clay body matures/vitrifies at Cone 5 and you fire to Cone 5, then you should not have a problem with leaks or dampness. You could run into problems if your clay body is Cone 10 and you only fire to Cone 5.

 

Commercial glazes tend to be more expensive than ones you mix yourself. If you go commercial, consider buying dry glazes and mixing them yourself. No need to pay FEDEX/UPS/US Mail for shipping water to your home. Regardless, you will have to test to see if the glaze -- commercial or home mixed -- fits your clay body, is durable, and -- in the case of home mixed -- does not leach, etc.

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Pyewackette    1

If your clay body matures/vitrifies at Cone 5 and you fire to Cone 5, then you should not have a problem with leaks or dampness. You could run into problems if your clay body is Cone 10 and you only fire to Cone 5.

 

Commercial glazes tend to be more expensive than ones you mix yourself. If you go commercial, consider buying dry glazes and mixing them yourself. No need to pay FEDEX/UPS/US Mail for shipping water to your home. Regardless, you will have to test to see if the glaze -- commercial or home mixed -- fits your clay body, is durable, and -- in the case of home mixed -- does not leach, etc.

 

I've thought about this quite a bit but no potter I know actually does this. Not that I know THAT many potters in person, but still. They keep telling me it is impossible without a pug mill; but then a lot of them also seem to be sort of down on the idea of reclaim, and (at least in the quantities I have around) reclaim is no problem for me.

 

What's the reconstitution method if you don't have a pug mill?

 

"I don't need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me."

-- Stephen Fry

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bciskepottery    925

If your clay body matures/vitrifies at Cone 5 and you fire to Cone 5, then you should not have a problem with leaks or dampness. You could run into problems if your clay body is Cone 10 and you only fire to Cone 5.

 

Commercial glazes tend to be more expensive than ones you mix yourself. If you go commercial, consider buying dry glazes and mixing them yourself. No need to pay FEDEX/UPS/US Mail for shipping water to your home. Regardless, you will have to test to see if the glaze -- commercial or home mixed -- fits your clay body, is durable, and -- in the case of home mixed -- does not leach, etc.

 

I've thought about this quite a bit but no potter I know actually does this. Not that I know THAT many potters in person, but still. They keep telling me it is impossible without a pug mill; but then a lot of them also seem to be sort of down on the idea of reclaim, and (at least in the quantities I have around) reclaim is no problem for me.

 

What's the reconstitution method if you don't have a pug mill?

 

"I don't need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me."

-- Stephen Fry

 

You do not need a pug mill to mix dry glazes. Just a drill w/mixer, a couple of sieves (60 and 80 mesh, minimum), spatula/brush, and a couple of buckets.

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Pyewackette    1

If your clay body matures/vitrifies at Cone 5 and you fire to Cone 5, then you should not have a problem with leaks or dampness. You could run into problems if your clay body is Cone 10 and you only fire to Cone 5.

 

Commercial glazes tend to be more expensive than ones you mix yourself. If you go commercial, consider buying dry glazes and mixing them yourself. No need to pay FEDEX/UPS/US Mail for shipping water to your home. Regardless, you will have to test to see if the glaze -- commercial or home mixed -- fits your clay body, is durable, and -- in the case of home mixed -- does not leach, etc.

 

I've thought about this quite a bit but no potter I know actually does this. Not that I know THAT many potters in person, but still. They keep telling me it is impossible without a pug mill; but then a lot of them also seem to be sort of down on the idea of reclaim, and (at least in the quantities I have around) reclaim is no problem for me.

 

What's the reconstitution method if you don't have a pug mill?

 

"I don't need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me."

-- Stephen Fry

 

You do not need a pug mill to mix dry glazes. Just a drill w/mixer, a couple of sieves (60 and 80 mesh, minimum), spatula/brush, and a couple of buckets.

 

DUH! My bad! I thought you were talking about CLAY itself, not the glazes. I would like to mix my own CLAY bodies at some point, just because of the cost of shipping all that water, LOL!

 

Sorry!

 

"I don't need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me."

-- Stephen Fry

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If your clay body matures/vitrifies at Cone 5 and you fire to Cone 5, then you should not have a problem with leaks or dampness. You could run into problems if your clay body is Cone 10 and you only fire to Cone 5.

 

Commercial glazes tend to be more expensive than ones you mix yourself. If you go commercial, consider buying dry glazes and mixing them yourself. No need to pay FEDEX/UPS/US Mail for shipping water to your home. Regardless, you will have to test to see if the glaze -- commercial or home mixed -- fits your clay body, is durable, and -- in the case of home mixed -- does not leach, etc.

 

Thanks, I feel a little better, but I really have a lot to learn about clay bodies. I guess I will have to go for it and see what happens. As for the glazes, I never thought about the water. That's so true, duh. I'm sorry about this late reply back to my question, I work a full time job then other things happen that take me away from doing what I love. But that's life. So thanks again.

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